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IT Certification Quizzes & Trivia

Having an IT certification helps improve your skill set and showcases your credibility to the employer. Take these online IT certification quizzes to test your knowledge. The quiz questions are well-researched to give learners clarity on various concepts and get high scores in the final exam.
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ACI is seen by many as Cisco's software-defined networking (SDN) offering for data center and cloud networks. This course is perfect for h helping someone pass their plumbing exam and prove that they can undertake the duties...

Questions: 25  |  Attempts: 7110   |  Last updated: Sep 10, 2020
  • Sample Question
    The C of F Holder and the impairment coordinator shall be made aware of and authorize the placement of system(s) out of service that are planned to be shut down. The impairment coordinator prior to taking a system out of service shall:

SOA Certification Braindump quiz

Questions: 108  |  Attempts: 855   |  Last updated: Jan 18, 2013
  • Sample Question
    Which need drives a project to use an SOA approach?

Pro Tools 201: Pro Tools Production II

Questions: 55  |  Attempts: 1590   |  Last updated: Jul 13, 2020
  • Sample Question
    The 48-bit mixer offers +__dB of mixer head-room.

A practice exam with a few questions found on an actual Pro-Tools 110 Certification Exam

Questions: 11  |  Attempts: 5522   |  Last updated: Jan 17, 2013
  • Sample Question
    To prevent multiple warnings when deleting/modifying multiple tracks/files, simply hold ___________ on Yes/No in the dailog box to have one answer apply to the rest.



Questions: 20  |  Attempts: 678   |  Last updated: Oct 6, 2020
  • Sample Question
    You are going to read a newspaper article about a museum in New York. For questions 1 - 7, choose the answer A, B, C or D which you think fits best according to the text. _________________________________________________________________________           For the art, turn left at the dance floor It is Saturday night at the Brooklyn Museum of Art in New York, a large important-looking nineteenth-century building. Since six o'clock, entry to the museum has been free of charge. People are shouting in the galleries, but the guards, who seem to be unusually relaxed, take no notice. On the ground floor, in the galleries devoted to African art, children are playing hide-and-seek while their parents  sip beer from plastic cups. Some teenage girls wonder by, leaving a trail of perfume, and head through the sculpture exhibition to a temporary dance floor where a DJ is playing reggae music. Watching the scene is Bryan, a young teacher from a local school.  What brings him out tonight? 'I'm here for the reggae, of course,' he says. ' When I heard they were playing that I thought, " I have to be there", and obviously a lot of people feel the same way.' Besides the DJ, the museum has  laid on gallery talks, a Martin Scorsese film, a puppet show and a samba band.         The Brooklyn Museum of Art wasn't always so trendy. For decades, it put on excellent exhibitions that few come to see. Guidebooks described the enormous building as ' an undiscovered treat'. Had it been over in the city's fashionable Upper East Side, of course, the museum would have been packing them in. Even when they put on dull exhibitions, New York's top museums can count on a steady stream of visitors - mostly tourists. But Brooklyn, one of the New York's toughest districts, isn't on the standard tourist route. When the museum was built, it was a wealthy suburb, but these days the surrounding streets are home to recent immigrants, mostly poor folk from the Caribbean.        Two years ago, in an effort to revive itself, the museum appointed a new director, Arnold Lehman, who was born in Brooklyn. Lehman was convinced that the museum should forget about trying to attract visitors from the other side of town and try to appeal instead to people from the surrounding area. ' The neighbourhood's changed,' he explains, ' but this is where the museum is, and we can't - and won't - pretend we're somewhere else.'       The free evening events, called 'First Saturdays', are Lehman's way of reaching out to people. They are certainly popular: the crush of visitors has forced the museum to move the dance floor from the entrance hall to the car park. Lehman is delighted with the result: 'It's remarkable to hear people say, "I live four blocks away, and I've never been in this building before". The great thing for me is when you see teenage boys looking at art in the galleries without being handcuffed to their parents,' he says. What's more, the annual number of visitors to the museum has roughly doubled, from 250.000 to half a million since the scheme was introduced. Similar institutions across the country are now calling, wanting to know how much it costs 'to throw a good party'. The answer, incidentally, is about $ 25,000 per event. 'And worth every dime,' says Lehman.        Tonight, a woman called Akesha, who seems to vindicate the new direction the museum has taken, is standing on the edge of the dance floor. Akesha walked to the museum from her home, but hasn't been here since primary school, when a teacher organized a trip to see an exhibition. ' The free concert is why I came,' she admits, 'but I must come back and look round the museum.' Others who come to dance find their way into the galleries almost by accident - like Jean-Michel, who lost his friends in the crush of dancers and thought he might as well take a look at the art. The real achievement of First Saturdays is, therefore, both more significant and more profound than the increased visitor numbers suggest. Most people visit art museums because they want to have a special 'artistic' experience. The Brooklyn Museum of Art has introduced thousands of people to the idea that museum-going can be a perfectly ordinary part of their lives.      ____________________________________________________________________ What has attracted the man called Bryan to the museum this evening?
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