Pns Quiz No.05b

35 Questions

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Ecology Quizzes & Trivia

Theories of Land Use


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Human Ecology: Differential distribution of population and economic activities in a city, and the manner in which they have focused on the center of the city?
    • A. 

      Concentration

    • B. 

      Decentralization

    • C. 

      Segregation

    • D. 

      Invasion

  • 2. 
    Human Ecology: the location of activity away from the central city?
    • A. 

      Concentration

    • B. 

      Decentralization

    • C. 

      Segregation

    • D. 

      Invasion

  • 3. 
    Human Ecology: the sorting out of population groups according to conscious preferences for associating with one group or another through bias and prejudice?
    • A. 

      Concentration

    • B. 

      Decentralization

    • C. 

      Segregation

    • D. 

      Invasion

  • 4. 
    Human Ecology:traditionally, a process through which a new activity or social group enters an area?
    • A. 

      Concentration

    • B. 

      Decentralization

    • C. 

      Segregation

    • D. 

      Invasion

  • 5. 
    Human Ecology:a new use or social group gradually replaces the former occupants?
    • A. 

      Succession

    • B. 

      Assimilation

    • C. 

      Segregation

    • D. 

      Invasion

  • 6. 
    Human Ecology: diverse social groups find a mode of peaceful co-existence?
    • A. 

      Succession

    • B. 

      Assimilation/ Accommodation

    • C. 

      Segregation

    • D. 

      Invasion

  • 7. 
    Applied the principles of evolution and natural history to study social behavior except one:
    • A. 

      Roderick D. McKenzie

    • B. 

      Amos H. Hawley

    • C. 

      Robert Park

    • D. 

      Everett Hughes

    • E. 

      Ernest W. Burgess

  • 8. 
    Concentric Zone Theory is an application of Von Thünen’s theory to urban areas. Who introduce this theory of urban structure?
    • A. 

      Ernest W. Burgerss

    • B. 

      Homer Hoyt

    • C. 

      Edward Ullman & Chauncy Harris

    • D. 

      Peter Mann

    • E. 

      None of the choices

  • 9. 
    Concentric Zone Theory by Burgess: CBD-‚Äč location of tertiary employment and urban transport infrastructure (most accessible zone)
    • A. 

      Zone 1

    • B. 

      Zone 2

    • C. 

      Zone 3

    • D. 

      Zone 4

    • E. 

      Zone 5

  • 10. 
    Concentric Zone Theory by Burgess: Zone of Transition (Residential); low income and mix of low-end uses
    • A. 

      Zone 1

    • B. 

      Zone 2

    • C. 

      Zone 3

    • D. 

      Zone 4

    • E. 

      Zone 5

  • 11. 
    Concentric Zone Theory by Burgess: Zone of Low Cost Homes – Working Class Residence Ring (slums; contains poorest segment of urban population)
    • A. 

      Zone 1

    • B. 

      Zone 2

    • C. 

      Zone 3

    • D. 

      Zone 4

    • E. 

      Zone 5

  • 12. 
    Concentric Zone Theory by Burgess: Zone of Better Residences –High class apartment and single family ring (including shopping and commercial); white collar workers and middle class families.
    • A. 

      Zone 1

    • B. 

      Zone 2

    • C. 

      Zone 3

    • D. 

      Zone 4

    • E. 

      Zone 5

  • 13. 
    Concentric Zone Theory by Burgess: Commuter Zone (sub-urban and semi-rural) – middle class and upper income groups.
    • A. 

      Zone 1

    • B. 

      Zone 2

    • C. 

      Zone 3

    • D. 

      Zone 4

    • E. 

      Zone 5

  • 14. 
    Sector or Radial Model (Homer Hoyt, 1939): CBD?
    • A. 

      Zone 1

    • B. 

      Zone 2

    • C. 

      Zone 3

    • D. 

      Zone 4

    • E. 

      Zone 5

  • 15. 
    Sector or Radial Model (Homer Hoyt, 1939): Wholesale and Light Manufacturing?
    • A. 

      Zone 1

    • B. 

      Zone 2

    • C. 

      Zone 3

    • D. 

      Zone 4

    • E. 

      Zone 5

  • 16. 
    Sector or Radial Model (Homer Hoyt, 1939): Lower Class Residential?
    • A. 

      Zone 1

    • B. 

      Zone 2

    • C. 

      Zone 3

    • D. 

      Zone 4

    • E. 

      Zone 5

  • 17. 
    Sector or Radial Model (Homer Hoyt, 1939): Middle Class Residential?
    • A. 

      Zone 1

    • B. 

      Zone 2

    • C. 

      Zone 3

    • D. 

      Zone 4

    • E. 

      Zone 5

  • 18. 
    Sector or Radial Model (Homer Hoyt, 1939): Upper Class Residential?
    • A. 

      Zone 1

    • B. 

      Zone 2

    • C. 

      Zone 3

    • D. 

      Zone 4

    • E. 

      Zone 5

  • 19. 
    All are true statements regarding Sector/ Radial Model by H.Hoyt except one:
    • A. 

      City develops in a series of sectors instead of rings

    • B. 

      As city grows, activities expands in a wedge, or sector, from the center (due to emergence of star-shaped transportation routes - bus lines/street car lines)

    • C. 

      Once district with high-class housing is established, the most expensive houses are built on the outer edge of that district further from the center

    • D. 

      Place of high value land uses not only in CBD but tend to follow the arterial (new high accessibility area, i.e. waterfront, mountainous, etc.)

    • E. 

      City grows from several independent points or growth centers where activities revolve rather than from one CBD

    • F. 

      Relates accessibility (transport), land use and land values

  • 20. 
    All are true statements regarding Axial Model (Transport Model based on Homer Hoyt’s Sector Model) except one:
    • A. 

      Travel time rather than transport cost is the important determinant of land use

    • B. 

      Takes into account the effect of route ways for land use

    • C. 

      Major roads radiate from center of town

    • D. 

      Commercial development follows transport routes resulting in Star-shaped pattern of land use

    • E. 

      Commuter village separated from built up areas as main feature

  • 21. 
    All are true statements regarding Multiple Nuclei Model (Chauncy Harris and Edward Ullman, 1945) except one:
    • A. 

      City grows from several independent points or growth centers where activities revolve rather than from one CBD

    • B. 

      No clear CBD

    • C. 

      Separate nuclei often a result of requirements of specialized facilities and rent

    • D. 

      Certain activities repel each other (factories and high class residential)

    • E. 

      Local government played a crucial role in slum clearance and gentrification

  • 22. 
    Rooted their model in four geographic principles: Multiple Nuclei Model (Chauncy Harris and Edward Ullman, 1945) except one:
    • A. 

      Certain activities require highly specialized facilities

    • B. 

      Certain activities cluster because they profit from mutual association

    • C. 

      Certain activities repel each other and will not be found in the same area

    • D. 

      Certain activities could not make a profit if they paid the high rent of the most desirable locations

    • E. 

      Certain activities is inversely related to the distance between them

  • 23. 
    Multiple Nuclei Model (Chauncy Harris and Edward Ullman, 1945); All are true statement except one:
    • A. 

      1 Open Space; 2 Wholesale and Light Manufacturing

    • B. 

      3 Lower Class; 4 Middle Class

    • C. 

      5 Upper Class; 6 Heavy Manufacturing

    • D. 

      7 Sub-Business District; 8 Residential Suburb

    • E. 

      9 Industrial Suburb, 1 CBD

  • 24. 
    Multiple Nuclei-Sector Theory (Peter Mann, 1965):  All are true statements regarding the figure except one: 
    • A. 

      1 City Centre; A- Middle Class Sector

    • B. 

      2 Transitional Zone; B- Lower-Middle-Class Sector

    • C. 

      5 Commuting Distance Villages; C-Working Class Sector

    • D. 

      D lndustry and lowest working class area

    • E. 

      D High Class Sector

  • 25. 
    Multiple Nuclei-Sector Theory (Peter Mann, 1965), All are true statements except one:
    • A. 

      The structure of a city is a complex interplay between rings and sectors (combination of Burgess and Hoyt)

    • B. 

      Commuter village separated from built up areas as main feature

    • C. 

      The twilight zone (transition zone) was not concentric around the CBD

    • D. 

      Local government played a crucial role in slum clearance and gentrification

    • E. 

      A commercial spine and axis of business is surrounded by elite residential housing

  • 26. 
    All are true statements regarding Gravity Model (Spatial Interaction) except one:
    • A. 

      Model is an approach to analyze spatial interaction between spatially separated nodes (migration, commodity, residence-workplace trips, etc)

    • B. 

      Directly related to populations

    • C. 

      Inversely related to the distance between them

    • D. 

      (Population 1) x (Population 2) / distance2

    • E. 

      Is a result of leapfrog development

  • 27. 
    All are true statement regarding Galactic City (Peirce F. Lewis) except one:
    • A. 

      Galactic Metropolis is a result of leapfrog development

    • B. 

      Automobile as primary means of transport

    • C. 

      Result: Doughnut like, because center is kept at very low density, while more activity distributed along ring roads

    • D. 

      CBD dominates the center with 2 main divisions (traditional market and modern high-rises)

  • 28. 
    Latin American city model (Griffin-Ford Model): Zone of maturity – better houses, paved streets, good transport, schools?
    • A. 

      Yellow Area

    • B. 

      Yellow Green Area

    • C. 

      Orange Area

    • D. 

      Green (Dotted) Area

    • E. 

      Blue Area

  • 29. 
    Latin American city model (Griffin-Ford Model): Zone of in situ accretion – mixed quality of housing, some schools, only main streets paved?
    • A. 

      Yellow Area

    • B. 

      Yellow Green Area

    • C. 

      Orange Area

    • D. 

      Green (Dotted) Area

    • E. 

      Blue Area

  • 30. 
    Latin American city model (Griffin-Ford Model): Zone of peripheral squatter settlements – makeshift shanty houses, high unemployment, no basic services?
    • A. 

      Yellow Area

    • B. 

      Yellow Green Area

    • C. 

      Orange Area

    • D. 

      Green (Dotted) Area

    • E. 

      Blue Area

  • 31. 
    Latin American city model (Griffin-Ford Model): Gentrification?
    • A. 

      Yellow Area

    • B. 

      Yellow Green Area

    • C. 

      Orange Area

    • D. 

      Green (Dotted) Area

    • E. 

      Blue Area

  • 32. 
    Latin American city model (Griffin-Ford Model): Elite residential Sector?
    • A. 

      Yellow Area

    • B. 

      Yellow Green Area

    • C. 

      Orange Area

    • D. 

      Green (Dotted) Area

    • E. 

      Blue Area

  • 33. 
    Latin American city model (Griffin-Ford Model): Middle Class Residential?
    • A. 

      Yellow Area

    • B. 

      Yellow Green Area

    • C. 

      Orange Area

    • D. 

      Green (Dotted) Area

    • E. 

      Beige

  • 34. 
    All are true statements regarding "Edge Cities" except one:
    • A. 

      Defined as "satellite" centers of employment and shopping located away from the CBD of a city

    • B. 

      Noders are formed in response to the rapid development of cities at major suburban freeway interchanges

    • C. 

      Very new; about 30 years ago were villages or rural farmland

    • D. 

      None of the choices

  • 35. 
    • A. 

      Joel Garreau

    • B. 

      Peirce F. Lewis

    • C. 

      Peter Mann

    • D. 

      Ernest Burgess