Hearing Loss And Visual Impairment:

5 Questions | Total Attempts: 57

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Hearing Quizzes & Trivia

Hearing Loss and Visual Impairment Quiz:


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The three barriers to care for visual impairment are: •Inability to see properly and visually sense surroundings - i.e. putting toothpaste on toothbrush. •Visual cues that would raise concern go undetected – i.e. caries, cancerous lesions. •Difficulty understanding and grasping oral hygiene instruction – i.e. cannot visually see the educators demonstrations.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 2. 
     A visual impairment is defined as:
    • A. 

      A loss of sight without apparent organic pathology.

    • B. 

      A partial or total loss of sight without pathology of the eye; caused by disease of the optic nerve or retina or brain.

    • C. 

      A visual defect in which objects appear to have a yellowish hue.

  • 3. 
    A hearing impairment is a problem conducting sound waves anywhere along the route through the outer ear, tympanic membrane (eardrum), or middle ear (ossicles).
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 4. 
    What are some devices to help those with hearing impairments?
    • A. 

      Cochlear implants, Hearing aids, Instant messaging, Speech recognition, TTY’s or TDD’s - computer devices.

    • B. 

      Earphones, iPod's or sign language interpreters.

    • C. 

      Guide dog, speech pathologist or none of the above.

  • 5. 
    Educational care considerations for a dental hygienist treating a client with a hearing impairment are:
    • A. 

      Use imagery and give thorough visual explanations of dental health education and oral health instruction so the client can understand.

    • B. 

      Pay attention to their body language to gauge their comfort and comprehension level.

    • C. 

      If you know sign language, communicate directly to the client in this way; if the client has brought an interpreter, communicate by talking to both individuals, don’t be discouraged when the client is looking at the interpreter and not at you

    • D. 

      Explain what you are doing before you do it: for example, let the client hear the slow speed before it is suddenly in their mouth; tell the client you are going to feel their face and neck before doing so.

    • E. 

      Show enthusiasm in your face and body language, as you would show in your voice: use gestures, eye contact and facial expressions.

    • F. 

      All of the above.