Test Your Media Law Knowledge

8 Questions | Total Attempts: 76

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Test Your Media Law Knowledge

Test your knowledge with our completely hypothetical and fictitious array of media law questions


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Talk of a satanist inner circle in the Houses of Parliament during the 1990s is the subject of a prime­time current affairs TV show. No names are named, you can't guess who they're talking about from the show, and the broadcaster doesn't put the show on the internet. But within an hour thousands of people on Twitter are identifying a retired minister, now a lord, as the ringleader. What is most likely to land in legal trouble?
    • A. 

      Tweeting about the television show being an "interesting insight" into 90s politics

    • B. 

      Tweeting a link to a satanist conspiracy website, accompanied by the hashtag and asking "does this take the story on Lord X further?"

    • C. 

      Tweeting to ask why the lord in question is trending

    • D. 

      Tweeting that you always suspected something was amiss in 90s parliament

  • 2. 
    On a story about a local businessman, a rival posts a number of comments with tales of mistreating workers and cost­cutting. The subject of the story and comments gets in touch, demanding that the comments are removed. Do you take down the post? Which most accurately describes the current law?
    • A. 

      Yes, because otherwise you run the risk of being sued in defamation

    • B. 

      No, because you have a right to free speech and this is in the public interest

    • C. 

      No, but you give him a right of reply, which will help defend any defamation claim

    • D. 

      No, because the comment poster has identified himself

  • 3. 
    Which of the following should you never do from a court room?
    • A. 

      Tweet comments made by witnesses when giving evidence

    • B. 

      Tweet comments made by judge in open court

    • C. 

      Tweet arguments made by barristers when the jury is not in court

    • D. 

      Tweet a description of the defendant

  • 4. 
    Scanning through Instagram you see some photographs that would perfectly complement the travel piece you have just finished. There's no one in the photo, so they're ok to use, right?
    • A. 

      Yes, if they're on Instagram, it's in the public domain

    • B. 

      No, find a royalty-free image

    • C. 

      Yes, your reĀ­use of them is fair use

    • D. 

      No, Instagram have first refusal on the third-party use of images uploaded to the service, so you would have to contact Instagram and the photographer

  • 5. 
    As a young and enthusiastic local journalist, you turn up early to a council meeting. You are let into the council chamber, and see lying on a table a document marked 'private and confidential'. It describes a series of cuts the council are planning to make to public services. Can you report it? Choose the best legal answer.
    • A. 

      Yes, it's likely to be in the public interest

    • B. 

      No, it's private and confidential

    • C. 

      Yes, as if the council left it lying around, it's their problem

    • D. 

      No, the council have a right of privacy before the meeting becomes public

  • 6. 
    As the council meeting begins you set up your laptop, smartphone and GoPro camera, ready to document everything. Before the meeting even gets started, the council leader spots you and your equipment, and promptly has you removed by the police. Which of the following statements is most accurate?
    • A. 

      The council leaders have the power to have anyone removed from meetings

    • B. 

      You have a right to document council meetings

    • C. 

      It is illegal to film council meetings

    • D. 

      It is illegal to tweet or liveblog council meetings

  • 7. 
    A source gives you the keys, passwords, codes and login information for their business partner's private office, where they promise you will find proof of money ­laundering and human ­trafficking. They say you have one night to go in and find all the information you need, but that is all, after which access codes will change.Would following their suggestion break any laws? Choose the best answer.
    • A. 

      Yes

    • B. 

      No

    • C. 

      Yes, but a journalist acting in the public interest has a defence so you'll be ok

    • D. 

      Yes, but you have a reasonable chance of not going to prison if you have a good lawyer

  • 8. 
    A group of protestors storm the Apple store on Regent Street in protest at the company's perceived tax evasion, refusing to leave and handcuffing themselves to chairs, table legs and Macbook Pro chargers. You join the throng to conduct interviews just as the police turn up, and are led to the cells along with anyone else not tied down.Do the police have the right to arrest you? What is the best answer?
    • A. 

      Yes, the Apple store is technically private property

    • B. 

      No, it is a public gathering

    • C. 

      Yes, if you refused to leave when asked by a senior police officer

    • D. 

      No, you are not part of the protest

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