Corporate Job Interview Questions

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| By Jbunney
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Jbunney
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Quizzes Created: 5 | Total Attempts: 766
Questions: 39 | Attempts: 158

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Interview Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Why do we use rating scales to determine level of function.

  • 2. 

    What are the three rating scales that were mentioned in class

  • 3. 

    Who do you include in the interview process

    • A.

      Patient

    • B.

      Care provider/family

    • C.

      Medical Staff

    • D.

      Previous therapists

    • E.

      Employeers

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Patient
    B. Care provider/family
    C. Medical Staff
    D. Previous therapists
    Explanation
    The interview process should include the patient, as they are the one receiving care and their input is vital for understanding their needs and preferences. The care provider or family should also be included as they can provide valuable information about the patient's medical history and support system. Medical staff should be involved to ensure that the patient's medical needs are properly addressed. Previous therapists can provide insights into the patient's previous treatments and progress. Employers may not be directly involved in the interview process as they are not directly related to the patient's healthcare.

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  • 4. 

    What should be reviewed

    • A.

      History and physical report

    • B.

      Discharge report

    • C.

      CT scans

    • D.

      Chest x-rays

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. History and physical report
    B. Discharge report
    C. CT scans
    D. Chest x-rays
    Explanation
    The items listed in the answer are all components of a patient's medical records that should be reviewed. The history and physical report provides important information about the patient's medical history and current condition. The discharge report contains details about the patient's treatment and instructions for follow-up care. CT scans and chest x-rays are imaging tests that can provide valuable information about the patient's internal organs and structures. Reviewing all of these documents can help healthcare professionals gain a comprehensive understanding of the patient's health status and make informed decisions about their care.

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  • 5. 

    In the what questions what do we ask

    • A.

      Ever had treatment or swallowing problems before?

    • B.

      Does food get stuck in throat/mouth? Where?

    • C.

      When does the problem typically happen?

    • D.

      Coughing/choking when eating?

    • E.

      Coughing/choking when sleeping?

    • F.

      Problems drooling?

    • G.

      Types of foods/liquids that cause problems?

    • H.

      History of GERD/LPR (heartburn), currently on meds?

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Ever had treatment or swallowing problems before?
    D. Coughing/choking when eating?
    E. Coughing/choking when sleeping?
    F. Problems drooling?
    G. Types of foods/liquids that cause problems?
    H. History of GERD/LPR (heartburn), currently on meds?
    Explanation
    The given correct answer includes a list of questions that should be asked to gather information about the patient's history of treatment or swallowing problems, as well as specific symptoms such as coughing or choking when eating or sleeping, problems with drooling, and the types of foods or liquids that cause problems. Additionally, it asks about the patient's history of GERD/LPR and whether they are currently taking medication for it. These questions are important in assessing the patient's swallowing function and identifying any potential issues or underlying conditions.

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  • 6. 

    What are the where questions that are asked 

    • A.

      Does food get stuck in throat/mouth? Where?

    • B.

      Location where they typically eat?

    • C.

      When does the problem typically happen?

    • D.

      Option4

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Does food get stuck in throat/mouth? Where?
    B. Location where they typically eat?
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Does food get stuck in throat/mouth? Where?" and "Location where they typically eat?" because these questions are related to the topic of food getting stuck in the throat or mouth. The first question asks about the specific location where the food gets stuck, while the second question asks about the general location where people typically eat. These questions help gather information about the problem and its potential causes.

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  • 7. 

    What are the when questions

    • A.

      When does the problem typically happen?

    • B.

      When did the problem start?

    • C.

      When is it hard to swallow

    • D.

      Option4

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. When does the problem typically happen?
    B. When did the problem start?
    Explanation
    The correct answer is option 4 because it includes both the questions "When does the problem typically happen?" and "When did the problem start?". These questions are relevant to understanding the timing and occurrence of the problem.

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  • 8. 

    What are the who questions asked in a case history 

    • A.

      Who typically eats with the patient?

    • B.

      Must the patient be fed by someone else?

    • C.

      Diet modification already in place? ST or patient modified?

    • D.

      Option4

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Who typically eats with the patient?
    B. Must the patient be fed by someone else?
    Explanation
    The correct answer includes two questions that are asked in a case history. The first question asks about who typically eats with the patient, which helps in understanding the patient's social support system and potential issues related to eating. The second question asks whether the patient must be fed by someone else, which helps in assessing the patient's ability to self-feed and potential need for assistance or intervention. These questions provide valuable information about the patient's eating habits and support needs.

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  • 9. 

    What are the how questions asked in a case history

    Correct Answer(s)
    Special feeding techniques? Diet modification already in place? ST or patient modified? Cognitively intact/able to remember and follow direction?
    Explanation
    The correct answer includes three how questions that can be asked in a case history related to special feeding techniques, diet modification, and cognitive abilities. These questions aim to gather information about the specific techniques used for feeding, whether any diet modifications have already been implemented and who made the modifications, and the patient's cognitive abilities and ability to remember and follow directions. These questions help in understanding the patient's current feeding situation and any modifications that may be needed.

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  • 10. 

    What do we look at in the face while doing a visual inspection

    • A.

      Facial droop

    • B.

      Drooling

    • C.

      Food on the outside of the mouth

    • D.

      Dry lips

    • E.

      Anterior spillage

    • F.

      Dry scalp

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Facial droop
    B. Drooling
    C. Food on the outside of the mouth
    D. Dry lips
    E. Anterior spillage
    Explanation
    During a visual inspection of the face, we look for various signs and symptoms. Facial droop can indicate muscle weakness or nerve damage. Drooling may suggest a problem with swallowing or saliva control. Food on the outside of the mouth could indicate difficulty with eating or oral hygiene. Dry lips may be a sign of dehydration or inadequate moisture. Anterior spillage can indicate difficulty with controlling liquids or swallowing. Dry scalp, although listed as an option, is not typically assessed during a visual inspection of the face.

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  • 11. 

    What are the components of the oral motor assessment 

    • A.

      Labial

    • B.

      Jaw Control

    • C.

      Soft Palate

    • D.

      Protective mechanism assessment

    • E.

      Dry Swallow with laryngeal palpation

    • F.

      Laryngeal palpation

    • G.

      Cervial Ausculation

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Labial
    B. Jaw Control
    C. Soft Palate
    D. Protective mechanism assessment
    E. Dry Swallow with laryngeal palpation
    F. Laryngeal palpation
    G. Cervial Ausculation
    Explanation
    The components of the oral motor assessment include labial, jaw control, soft palate, protective mechanism assessment, dry swallow with laryngeal palpation, laryngeal palpation, and cervical auscultation. These components are used to evaluate the function and coordination of the muscles involved in speech, swallowing, and breathing. The labial component assesses the movement and strength of the lips, while jaw control evaluates the range of motion and strength of the jaw. The soft palate component examines the movement and function of the soft palate. Protective mechanism assessment evaluates the ability to protect the airway during swallowing. Dry swallow with laryngeal palpation assesses the coordination between swallowing and the movement of the larynx. Laryngeal palpation evaluates the movement and function of the larynx. Cervical auscultation assesses the sounds produced during swallowing.

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  • 12. 

    What are we looking for in labial oral motor assessment 

    • A.

      Purse and retraction

    • B.

      Alternating range of motion

    • C.

      Dry lips

    • D.

      Option4

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Purse and retraction
    B. Alternating range of motion
    Explanation
    In a labial oral motor assessment, we are looking for the ability to perform purse and retraction movements as well as alternating range of motion. These movements involve the lips and are important for functions such as speech and swallowing. The assessment helps determine if there are any difficulties or limitations in these movements, which can indicate potential oral motor issues. Dry lips, on the other hand, may not be directly related to the assessment of labial oral motor skills.

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  • 13. 

    What are we looking at in the lingual portion of the oral motor assessment 

    • A.

      Lateralization of the tongue- ROM

    • B.

      Elevation and depression -ROM

    • C.

      Tongue click on the roof of mouth to assess tongue base

    • D.

      Protrusion of the tongue- does it deviate to one side.

    • E.

      Retraction and resistance

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Lateralization of the tongue- ROM
    B. Elevation and depression -ROM
    C. Tongue click on the roof of mouth to assess tongue base
    D. Protrusion of the tongue- does it deviate to one side.
    E. Retraction and resistance
    Explanation
    In the lingual portion of the oral motor assessment, we are looking at various movements and abilities of the tongue. This includes assessing the range of motion (ROM) for lateralization (side-to-side movement) and elevation and depression (up-and-down movement). We also assess the ability to click the tongue on the roof of the mouth to assess the tongue base. Another aspect is checking if the tongue protrudes and if it deviates to one side. Lastly, we assess retraction (pulling back) and resistance (strength and control). These assessments help evaluate the functioning and coordination of the tongue in speech and swallowing.

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  • 14. 

    What do we assess in jaw control

    • A.

      Range of motion (it should be 3 fingers width minimum)

    • B.

      Pain with opening?

    • C.

      Chewing should not be assessed during p,o trials

    • D.

      Chewing is assessed during p.o trials

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Range of motion (it should be 3 fingers width minimum)
    B. Pain with opening?
    D. Chewing is assessed during p.o trials
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Range of motion (it should be 3 fingers width minimum), Pain with opening?, and Chewing is assessed during p.o trials. This is because when assessing jaw control, we need to evaluate the range of motion, ensuring that it is at least 3 fingers width. We also need to check for any pain experienced during opening the jaw. Additionally, chewing is assessed during post-operative trials to evaluate the patient's ability to chew properly.

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  • 15. 

    What do we assess in oral motor assessment with regards to the protective mechanism assessment 

    • A.

      Phonation is it strong or weak

    • B.

      Volitional cough is it strong or weak

    • C.

      Volitional clear is it strong or weak

    • D.

      Dry Swallow

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Phonation is it strong or weak
    B. Volitional cough is it strong or weak
    C. Volitional clear is it strong or weak
    Explanation
    In oral motor assessment, we assess the strength of various protective mechanisms. This includes assessing the strength of phonation, which refers to the ability to produce sound. We also assess the strength of volitional cough, which is the ability to forcefully expel air from the lungs to clear the airway. Additionally, we assess the strength of volitional clear, which is the ability to clear the throat of any obstructions or secretions. These assessments help determine if these protective mechanisms are functioning properly and if they are strong enough to protect the airway.

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  • 16. 

    What do we look at in an oral motor assessment with regards to the soft palate

    • A.

      Symmetry at rest with a flashlight

    • B.

      Gag reflux

    • C.

      Nasality present (indicates a poor velopharyngeal swallow)

    • D.

      Pain in opening

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Symmetry at rest with a flashlight
    B. Gag reflux
    C. Nasality present (indicates a poor velopharyngeal swallow)
    Explanation
    In an oral motor assessment, we look at the symmetry of the soft palate at rest with a flashlight to check for any abnormalities or asymmetry. Gag reflux is also assessed to determine the sensitivity and response of the soft palate. The presence of nasality indicates a poor velopharyngeal swallow, which can affect speech and swallowing. Pain in opening is not mentioned as a specific aspect to be assessed in relation to the soft palate.

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  • 17. 

    When we look at the Dry Swallow with Laryngeal palpation what are we looking at

    • A.

      See if they can initiate dry swallow

    • B.

      Palpate is the larynx elevating and protracting

    • C.

      Is there elevation with or without protraction

    • D.

      Option4

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. See if they can initiate dry swallow
    B. Palpate is the larynx elevating and protracting
    Explanation
    The correct answer is a combination of two statements. First, we are looking to see if the person can initiate a dry swallow. This means they can swallow without any liquid or food present in their mouth. Second, we are palpating (feeling) the larynx to determine if it is elevating (moving upward) and protracting (moving forward). By observing these actions, we can assess the function of the larynx during swallowing.

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  • 18. 

    What do we look at when we do Laryngeal Palpation

    • A.

      Elevation with or without protraction

    • B.

      Rate of elevation is it sluggish or fast

    • C.

      Fluid: is the movement uninterupted (how efficient is the pharyngeal phase)

    • D.

      Option4

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Elevation with or without protraction
    B. Rate of elevation is it sluggish or fast
    C. Fluid: is the movement uninterupted (how efficient is the pharyngeal phase)
    Explanation
    Laryngeal palpation is a technique used to assess the movement and function of the larynx during swallowing. When performing laryngeal palpation, we look for several things. Firstly, we observe whether there is elevation of the larynx, with or without protraction. This helps determine if the larynx is moving upward and forward as it should during swallowing. Secondly, we assess the rate of elevation, checking if it is sluggish or fast. This provides information about the efficiency of the swallowing process. Lastly, we examine the movement of fluid, ensuring that it is uninterrupted, which indicates the effectiveness of the pharyngeal phase of swallowing.

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  • 19. 

    Cervical Ausculation looks at how efficient the pharyngeal phase is

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Cervical auscultation is a method used to assess the efficiency of the pharyngeal phase of swallowing. This technique involves listening to the sounds produced by the throat during swallowing to detect any abnormalities or signs of aspiration. By listening to the sounds made by the muscles and structures involved in the pharyngeal phase, healthcare professionals can determine if the swallowing process is functioning properly or if there are any issues that need to be addressed. Therefore, the statement that cervical auscultation looks at how efficient the pharyngeal phase is, is true.

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  • 20. 

    What do we look at in cervical auscultation 

    • A.

      Place stethoscope on the side of the neck and listen to breathing on each side

    • B.

      Listen for gurgling

    • C.

      Have patient clear

    • D.

      If not cleared gurgling is still there

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Place stethoscope on the side of the neck and listen to breathing on each side
    B. Listen for gurgling
    C. Have patient clear
    D. If not cleared gurgling is still there
    Explanation
    Cervical auscultation is a technique used to assess swallowing function by listening to the sounds produced during swallowing. The correct answer suggests that in cervical auscultation, one should place the stethoscope on the side of the neck and listen to breathing on each side. This allows the healthcare professional to detect any abnormal sounds or gurgling noises that may indicate a problem with swallowing. Additionally, the answer mentions the importance of listening for gurgling and having the patient clear their throat. If gurgling persists even after the patient clears their throat, it may indicate a persistent issue with swallowing.

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  • 21. 

    What are the signs of silent aspiration

    • A.

      Gurguly wet vocal quality

    • B.

      Loss of voice

    • C.

      Watering Eyes

    • D.

      Running nose

    • E.

      Delayed cough

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Gurguly wet vocal quality
    B. Loss of voice
    C. Watering Eyes
    D. Running nose
    E. Delayed cough
    Explanation
    The signs of silent aspiration include a gurgly wet vocal quality, loss of voice, watering eyes, running nose, and delayed cough. Silent aspiration occurs when food or liquids enter the airway and cause irritation or infection. The gurgly wet vocal quality is a result of the liquid in the airway, while the loss of voice can occur due to the irritation caused by aspiration. Watering eyes and a running nose may be a response to the irritation in the airway. The delayed cough is a common symptom of silent aspiration, as the body may not immediately respond to clear the airway.

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  • 22. 

    Runs slowly out of glass ex would be a milkshake

    • A.

      Nectar

    • B.

      Honey

    • C.

      Pudding

    • D.

      Water

    Correct Answer
    B. Honey
    Explanation
    The given correct answer is "Honey" because honey is a thick, viscous liquid that can be described as running slowly out of a glass. It is commonly used as a sweetener and has a distinct taste. Nectar, pudding, and water do not fit the description of running slowly out of a glass.

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  • 23. 

    What was the purpose of creating the national dysphagia diet?

    Correct Answer
    Standardized and clearly defines levels
    Explanation
    The purpose of creating the national dysphagia diet was to establish standardized and clearly defined levels. This would ensure consistency and uniformity in the management and treatment of individuals with dysphagia, a swallowing disorder. By providing clear guidelines and levels, healthcare professionals can better assess and address the specific needs and dietary restrictions of individuals with dysphagia, ultimately improving their quality of life and reducing the risk of complications associated with swallowing difficulties.

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  • 24. 

    Can't drink out of a glass, it will fall off a spoon

    • A.

      Pudding

    • B.

      Water

    • C.

      Nectar

    • D.

      Thin

    Correct Answer
    A. Pudding
    Explanation
    The given statement implies that the substance cannot be consumed using a spoon because it will fall off. Pudding has a thick consistency, which makes it difficult to drink out of a glass and requires a spoon to eat. Therefore, pudding is the correct answer.

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  • 25. 

    When do we give thin liquids to patients 

    • A.

      When we want to slow down the swallow

    • B.

      When there is a fear that there may be aspiration

    • C.

      Poor oral control of the bolus with manipulation

    • D.

      Option4

    Correct Answer
    B. When there is a fear that there may be aspiration
    Explanation
    Thin liquids are given to patients when there is a fear that there may be aspiration. Aspiration occurs when food or liquid enters the airway instead of going down the esophagus. Thin liquids are easier to aspirate compared to thicker liquids, so they are given to patients in order to slow down the swallow and reduce the risk of aspiration. This is especially important for patients who have poor oral control of the bolus with manipulation, as they may have difficulty swallowing and are at a higher risk of aspiration.

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  • 26. 

    What is an example of puree consitency

    • A.

      Applesauce

    • B.

      Pudding

    • C.

      Water

    • D.

      Option4

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Applesauce
    B. Pudding
    Explanation
    An example of puree consistency is applesauce and pudding. Puree consistency refers to a smooth and creamy texture, typically achieved by blending or processing ingredients until they have a uniform and thick liquid-like consistency. Both applesauce and pudding are commonly made by pureeing or blending their respective ingredients, resulting in a smooth and creamy texture suitable for individuals with difficulty swallowing or chewing.

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  • 27. 

    What are some things that need to be considered besides a patients swallowing ability

    • A.

      Fatigue

    • B.

      Hydration

    • C.

      Appetite

    • D.

      Positioning

    • E.

      Oral care

    • F.

      Assistance to eat or drink required

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Fatigue
    B. Hydration
    C. Appetite
    D. Positioning
    E. Oral care
    F. Assistance to eat or drink required
    Explanation
    The correct answer includes factors that need to be considered besides a patient's swallowing ability. Fatigue is important to consider as it can affect a patient's ability to eat or drink. Hydration is crucial for overall health and should be monitored. Appetite is important to assess as it can impact a patient's willingness to eat or drink. Positioning is important for proper swallowing and digestion. Oral care is important to maintain oral health and prevent complications. Lastly, assessing if assistance is required for eating or drinking is necessary to ensure the patient's needs are met.

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  • 28. 

    Diet levels should include what:

    • A.

      Recommendations for solids and liquids

    • B.

      How to administer Medications

    • C.

      Aspirations precautions such as chin tuck, bite size, positioning, no straws if necessary

    • D.

      Regular oral care

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Recommendations for solids and liquids
    B. How to administer Medications
    C. Aspirations precautions such as chin tuck, bite size, positioning, no straws if necessary
    D. Regular oral care
    Explanation
    The correct answer includes recommendations for solids and liquids, how to administer medications, aspirations precautions such as chin tuck, bite size, positioning, no straws if necessary, and regular oral care. This means that when considering diet levels, it is important to provide guidance on what types of solid foods and liquids are appropriate, how to properly give medications, precautions to prevent choking or aspiration, and the importance of maintaining good oral hygiene.

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  • 29. 

    What are the advantages of Videofluroscopic Swallow Study (Modified Barium Swallow)

    • A.

      Oral activity during mastication and oral stage

    • B.

      No radiation needed

    • C.

      Clear views of all structures

    • D.

      Triggering of the pharyngeal swallow in the relation to the position of the bolus

    • E.

      Motor aspect of pharyngeal swallow

    • F.

      Pressure through speed of movement of the bolus (when it passes through the pharynx)

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Oral activity during mastication and oral stage
    D. Triggering of the pharyngeal swallow in the relation to the position of the bolus
    E. Motor aspect of pharyngeal swallow
    F. Pressure through speed of movement of the bolus (when it passes through the pharynx)
    Explanation
    The advantages of Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study (Modified Barium Swallow) include the ability to observe oral activity during mastication and the oral stage, triggering of the pharyngeal swallow in relation to the position of the bolus, assessment of the motor aspect of the pharyngeal swallow, and evaluation of pressure through the speed of movement of the bolus as it passes through the pharynx. This imaging technique does not require radiation and provides clear views of all structures involved in swallowing.

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  • 30. 

    What are the disadvantages of VFSS

    • A.

      Radiation Exposure

    • B.

      Use of Barium

    • C.

      Can't view structures dierctly

    • D.

      Need good training

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Radiation Exposure
    B. Use of Barium
    C. Can't view structures dierctly
    Explanation
    The disadvantages of VFSS include radiation exposure, as the procedure involves the use of X-rays. The use of barium, a contrast material, is another disadvantage as it can cause side effects such as constipation. Additionally, VFSS cannot directly visualize certain structures, making it challenging to identify specific abnormalities. Lastly, performing VFSS requires specialized training to ensure accurate interpretation of the results.

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  • 31. 

    What are the challanges of VFSS

    • A.

      Difficult to assess impact of fatigue

    • B.

      Barium may change food consistency

    • C.

      Patient may not tolerate

    • D.

      Controlled bolus vs. intake behaviors

    • E.

      Can't see during swallowing

    • F.

      Limits velopharyngeal closure

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Difficult to assess impact of fatigue
    B. Barium may change food consistency
    C. Patient may not tolerate
    D. Controlled bolus vs. intake behaviors
    Explanation
    The challenges of VFSS include difficulties in assessing the impact of fatigue on swallowing, as well as the potential for barium to change the consistency of food. Additionally, some patients may not tolerate the procedure, and the controlled bolus vs. intake behaviors may pose challenges. Another challenge is that during swallowing, it is not possible to see what is happening, and VFSS limits velopharyngeal closure.

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  • 32. 

    What are the advantages of FEES (videoendoscopy)

    • A.

      No radiation

    • B.

      Clear view of all structures

    • C.

      Assess airway closure

    • D.

      Biofeedback for patient

    • E.

      Assess management of secretions

    • F.

      Motor aspects of the pharyngeal swallow

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. No radiation
    B. Clear view of all structures
    C. Assess airway closure
    D. Biofeedback for patient
    E. Assess management of secretions
    Explanation
    FEES (videoendoscopy) has several advantages. Firstly, there is no radiation involved, which makes it a safer option compared to other imaging techniques. Secondly, it provides a clear view of all structures, allowing for a more accurate assessment. It also enables the assessment of airway closure, which is important in identifying any potential issues. Additionally, FEES allows for biofeedback for the patient, helping them understand and improve their swallowing function. Lastly, it helps in assessing the management of secretions and the motor aspects of the pharyngeal swallow.

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  • 33. 

    What are the disadvantages of FEES

    • A.

      Can't see during the swallow

    • B.

      Must define problem based upon location

    • C.

      Doesn't visualize oral prep oral stage

    • D.

      Limits VP closure

    • E.

      If the patient cant breathe through the nose they may have trouble with a scope

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Can't see during the swallow
    B. Must define problem based upon location
    C. Doesn't visualize oral prep oral stage
    D. Limits VP closure
    E. If the patient cant breathe through the nose they may have trouble with a scope
    Explanation
    FEES (Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing) has several disadvantages. Firstly, it does not provide visibility during the actual swallowing process, making it difficult to assess any abnormalities that may occur at that moment. Secondly, FEES requires the clinician to define the problem based on its location, which may limit the ability to identify underlying causes accurately. Additionally, FEES does not visualize the oral preparation stage of swallowing, potentially missing any issues that may arise during this phase. Moreover, FEES may limit the assessment of velopharyngeal (VP) closure, which is important for proper swallowing function. Lastly, if a patient cannot breathe through their nose, it can pose challenges when using a scope during the procedure.

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Quiz Review Timeline +

Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 20, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Apr 11, 2014
    Quiz Created by
    Jbunney
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