Home Self Study: Chapter 2 Capstone Exam

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David Pezzano
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Quizzes Created: 5 | Total Attempts: 1,354
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Study Quizzes & Trivia

This brief exam will test your retention of knowledge from Home Insurance Self Study Chapter 2: Home insurance underwriting
This is a closed book exam. You may not use notes while taking this exam.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Regarding vacant or abandoned homes:

    • A.

      Vacant or abandoned homes present a greater risk for liability losses than an occupied home

    • B.

      A property must be occupied for a minimum of 9 consecutive months to be insurable

    • C.

      Theft and fire risks are more likely in a vacant home

    • D.

      All listed answers are correct

    Correct Answer
    D. All listed answers are correct
    Explanation
    Section 2.1 Property insurance basics

    We do not insure vacant or abandoned homes because of the highly increased chances of both Section I and Section II losses. These properties are not insurable through our agency on neither a Dwelling or Homeowners series contract

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  • 2. 

    Excluding extraordinary circumstances, which of the following can we insure through Goji?(Check all answers that apply)

    • A.

      A home with a large dog

    • B.

      A rented apartment occupied only by the tenant, the property owner does not live on site

    • C.

      A home in a wind-pool requiring a wind exclusion (X-wind policy)

    • D.

      A manufactured home

    • E.

      A property for which the auto was written through a different carrier than the home insurance

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. A home with a large dog
    B. A rented apartment occupied only by the tenant, the property owner does not live on site
    E. A property for which the auto was written through a different carrier than the home insurance
    Explanation
    Section 2.1 – Qualifying a home

    The dog is insurable - the BREED of dog matters, not the SIZE of the dog
    We do not restrict our offerings of renters policies based on the occupancy of the LANDLORD
    While it is preferable to sell the auto and home witht he same carrier, there are many circumstances which prevent this. In those circumstances, we would prefer to write the lines of business through separate carriers than to lose the account entierly

    We do not write home, renters, condo, or dwelling policies which require a wind exclusion through any of our carriers
    While MODULAR homes are typically acceptable, manufactured homes are not acceptable through any of our carriers

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  • 3. 

    Which of the following claims scenarios would not count against the insured for the purposes of underwriting or policy rating?

    • A.

      The insured's home was determined to be a total loss twice within the last 5 years. Both losses were caused by catastrophic wildfires

    • B.

      The insured was the recipient of a homeowners liability claim settlement

    • C.

      The insured's home had to be repaired after he accidentally drove his car through his garage door

    • D.

      The insured's dog bit a visitor and broke the skin. After the claim was settled, the insured had the dog destroyed

    Correct Answer
    B. The insured was the recipient of a homeowners liability claim settlement
    Explanation
    Section 2.2 – Home claim basics

    The only scenario above that would have no negative impact on the insured's homeowners rates & eligibility is when the insured is the recipient of a homeowners liability claim. Since homeowners liability claims pay out to THIRD parties, this indicates that someone else's policy had to pay to the insured. This loss does not indicate any heightened risk for our policy.

    For the wildfire claim, this insured is extremely unlucky, but these claims still count for the purposes of rating and eligibility.
    For the dog bite: dog bite claims still count even if the dog was given up or destroyed
    For the car through the garage door: Homeowners insurance pays for vehicle damage to the insured's home If the insured had an HO-3 policy or better, this claim would be paid. Since the insured's policy did pay, this claim counts against the insured

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  • 4. 

    Which of the following claim reconciliation examples is correct?

    • A.

      The C.L.U.E. report lists a claim as open, but the insured insists that it is closed. The agent collects a L.O.E. confirming the insured's loss history and submits it with the policy. The agent also leaves notes to the underwriter describing the claim situation

    • B.

      The insured has a paid claim on a previously owned property. This claims was paid and filed while the insured lived in the home. The agent excludes this claim and leaves notes to the underwriter describing the situation.

    • C.

      The insured lives in a two-family home and has no insurable interest in the 2nd unit. A Coverage A claim pulls up for the unit not owned by the insured. The agent keeps this claim as affecting the rate and eligibility of the property because it reflects the overall risk exposure of the home

    • D.

      A claim pulls up on the insured's property, but the claim occurred prior to the insured owning the home. The agent keeps this claim as affecting the rate and eligibility of the property because it reflects the overall risk exposure of the home. The agent also leaves notes describing the loss, to the best of the insured's knowledge

    • E.

      All listed options are correct

    Correct Answer
    A. The C.L.U.E. report lists a claim as open, but the insured insists that it is closed. The agent collects a L.O.E. confirming the insured's loss history and submits it with the policy. The agent also leaves notes to the underwriter describing the claim situation
    Explanation
    Section 2.3 – Special claim scenarios

    The only appropriately handled situation above is the one involving the open claim. The agent acted appropriately in obtaining verification of the insured's account, submitting that proof to underwriting, and leaving notes to the underwriters referencing this. If the L.O.E. displayed different loss amounts than the C.L.U.E. report, the agent should adjust those on the application as well

    Claims on properties previously owned by the insured DO still count on applications for new properties as they demonstrate a pattern of lost.

    Claims on units connected to or in the same building as the insured for which the insured has no insurable interest do not count against the insured. The agent should ask if the insured knows anything about the loss and whether or not it affected the insured's section of the property and leave this information in the policy notes field for the underwriters.

    Claims on the insured's property that occurred prior to the insured taking ownership of the property do not count against the insured. The agent should ask if the insured knows anything about the damage and whether or not any damage still persists and leave these notes to the underwriter

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  • 5. 

    Which of the following phrasings is best for discovering issues with the physical condition of the home?

    • A.

      If you had to put your home up for sale tomorrow, what would you need to update to put it on the market and sell for top-dollar?

    • B.

      Please describe the quality of your home?

    • C.

      How would you define the condition of your home?

    • D.

      Are there any known issues with your home?

    Correct Answer
    A. If you had to put your home up for sale tomorrow, what would you need to update to put it on the market and sell for top-dollar?
    Explanation
    Section 2.4 – Identifying home quality issues

    Most insureds aren't sure how to answer vague questions like "describe the quality of your home" and may be put on notice to lie by questions with strong negative phrasings like "are there any known issues with your home?"

    The "put it up for sale" question encourages the insured to give a vivid and colorful picture of the home. This can unearth quality issues that may not have been discovered otherwise.

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  • 6. 

    Which of the following home quality issues are likely to require remediation before or immediately after binding in order to retain the policy?(Check all answers that apply)

    • A.

      A professionally installed pellet stove only used as a supplemental heat source

    • B.

      Multiple old cars in varying states of disrepair cars parked on the insureds premesis

    • C.

      A home lacking in any carbon monoxide alarms or smoke detectors

    • D.

      Missing panels of siding

    • E.

      A roof showing large patches of discoloration

    Correct Answer(s)
    B. Multiple old cars in varying states of disrepair cars parked on the insureds premesis
    C. A home lacking in any carbon monoxide alarms or smoke detectors
    D. Missing panels of siding
    E. A roof showing large patches of discoloration
    Explanation
    Section 2.4 – Identifying home quality issues

    Professionally installed wood/pellet stoves used only as a supplemental or secondary heating source are acceptable so long as the model of stove is UL approved and the chimneys cleaned at least annually

    Homes with questionable ability to withstand weather (broken or leaking windows, missing or chipped siding, or warped, moldy, or discolored roofing) should not be written until the loss is remediated

    Homes with yard trash are a liability exposure. Large numbers of "dead" cars on a property also bring up questions of foot traffic and business exposure. This is an infrequent but often unarguable reason for policy cancellation.

    Home lacking in smoke detectors or carbon monoxide alarms indicate a heightened risk of loss, and are signs of generally low pride of ownership. In some areas, missing these items may also be illegal.

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  • 7. 

    Which of the following would be a good reason to call contact an underwriter?(Check all answers that apply)

    • A.

      The insured has a business liability exposure that is not clearly defined by policy endorsements or exclusions

    • B.

      The home is built in a very unusual style or with extremely uncommon materials not outlined by the carrier's product guide

    • C.

      The customer requests an endorsement that is not offered by the carrier

    • D.

      The customer will not purchase the policy unless the Coverage A amount can be reduced to a lower value than the carrier's reconstruction cost

    • E.

      The policy is ineligible due to a loss that pre-dates the insured's ownership or interest in the home. No damage remains

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. The insured has a business liability exposure that is not clearly defined by policy endorsements or exclusions
    B. The home is built in a very unusual style or with extremely uncommon materials not outlined by the carrier's product guide
    E. The policy is ineligible due to a loss that pre-dates the insured's ownership or interest in the home. No damage remains
    Explanation
    Section 2.5 – Communicating with underwriters

    Underwriters can be consulted on occasion to help you to determine the eligibility or proper way to write an unusual risk. Once you have checked all available company and carrier resources (training documents, product guides, underwriting manuals) feel free to call an underwriter.

    Underwriters are not magicians. They cannot create coverage that the company does not offer, change rates for a single risk, or alter the reconstruction cost estimate of a home.

    Underwriters can also remove some "system edits," meaning they can help to remove a blockage in the system that is preventing you from writing a risk that you are 100% is eligible to be written (the claims scenario above)

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  • 8. 

    Which of the following situations is most likely to require the insured to provide proof of home updates to the insurer?

    • A.

      The insured's roof is new, but the insured's area had many recent claims filed due to a catastrophic hail storm

    • B.

      The insured's home is over 60 years of age in an area where aluminum wiring was common

    • C.

      The insured's roof is 20 years old and made of slate tiles

    • D.

      The insured's circuit breaker box is over 20 years old

    • E.

      None of the situations listed above would indicate a need for proof of updates

    Correct Answer
    B. The insured's home is over 60 years of age in an area where aluminum wiring was common
    Explanation
    Section 2.6 – Home insurance documentation

    Aluminum wiring is somewhat common in homes built over 50 years ago and it poses a substantial fire risk. Aging homes with this exposure will likely require proof that the aluminum wiring exposure has been updated and removed.

    Just because something is old doesn't mean it neads to be updated. 20 year old slate roofing is not required to be updated if the roof is in sound, weather-tight condition. While our carriers do require that all electrical systems are upgraded to circuit breakers, there are very few instances where a circuit breaker system of any age will require proof of updates.

    The insured is not required to update roofing or siding because other homes in the area experienced loss.

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  • 9. 

    When required an appraisal or receipt proving valuation should be no older than:

    • A.

      1 year

    • B.

      5 years

    • C.

      7 years

    • D.

      10 years

    Correct Answer
    B. 5 years
    Explanation
    Section 2.6 – Home insurance documentation

    Proof of valuation must be no older than 5 years

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  • 10. 

    Which of the following answers from a customer regarding underwriting factors would not typically require further clarifying questions?

    • A.

      "My dog is a mutt, I'm not really sure what it is"

    • B.

      "I'm not sure how old my roof is but the house was built a year or two ago"

    • C.

      "I'm pretty sure the house is covered right now"

    • D.

      None of the listed responses require additional follow up questions

    Correct Answer
    B. "I'm not sure how old my roof is but the house was built a year or two ago"
    Explanation
    Section 2.1 Property insurance basics

    Most vague answers regarding underwriting factors should be followed-up upon with deeper probing questions to clarify the eligibility of the risk. In the scenario above, it is ok that the insured does not know the age of the home's roof. Since the age of the home is very new, we can assume the roof is new as well.

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Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 19, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Oct 06, 2016
    Quiz Created by
    David Pezzano
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