Theory: Dog Training Best Practices

49 Questions | Total Attempts: 87

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Theory: Dog Training Best Practices - Quiz


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Food in training: Preference tests reveal that dogs' favorite food rewards (Combat Treats) are, in general, stinky and
    • A. 

      Soft and soggy

    • B. 

      Hard and crunchy

  • 2. 
    Food in training: A dog on the field doesn't appear to be all that food-motivated, even with high-value treats. We advise the owner to: 
    • A. 

      Give the reward in a playful way, so the dog has to chase, find, catch it rather than getting a freebie.

    • B. 

      Give larger quantities of the food. Sometimes the dog is so distracted by the environment that he won't smell / notice smaller quantities. 

  • 3. 
    How do we prevent dogs from blackmailing their handlers and always checking whether the handler has food before deciding to cooperate?
    • A. 

      We abruptly stop rewarding the behaviour with food, as soon as the dog masters it.

    • B. 

      We use the clicker word to mark the dog's success and only 1 second after we've said the word, does the food appear. 

  • 4. 
    Food in training: Behaviour economics is:
    • A. 

      The financial economics of dog training: best practices on how to manage a profitable dog training school or behaviour practice

    • B. 

      The science defining the limits to the amount of behaviour or training practice you can conduct in a time period.

    • C. 

      The science of incentives. Central question: How much work is a reward worth? i.e. The dog gave you million dollar effort, you have to pay a million dollar treat.

  • 5. 
    Food in training: Which of the following is NOT an example of behaviour economics?
    • A. 

      During the resource guarding exercise, we reward trusting us approaching a food dish by surprising the dog with even more delicious food than what they had in their dish.

    • B. 

      In the 'leave it' exercise, we start with practising asking the dog to ignore a boring temptation and we reward him with a high-value reward. Only as the dog gets better at it - as it costs him less effort to ignore temptation - do we reduce the value of the reward.

    • C. 

      During the 'princess exercise', we wait until the dog shows insight (i.e. he does a half-hop instead of jumping) before we reward.

    • D. 

      We reward even approximations of the desired behaviour, and gradually increase our criteria as the dog gets better at the exercise.

  • 6. 
    Best Practices: About discipline and saying 'no'. 
    • A. 

      We frown upon the use of the word 'no' and it has no place in raising and training a dog.

    • B. 

      When all else fails, it is perfectly OK

    • C. 

      It is fine to say no, as long as it is effective. If you have to repeat, then it's time to look at more strategic methods.

  • 7. 
    Best Practices: LIMA is not only ethically more defendible, but research also indicates that it is always more effective than more invasive methods. 
    • A. 

      True: pretty much all research papers looking into this back it up

    • B. 

      False: Many situations exist where harsher punishment methods help you reach your training goals faster. 

  • 8. 
    Best Practices: What are the advantages of Capturing ('Vangen') over Luring ('Lokken')? Several answers are possible. Pick them all. 
    • A. 

      With Capturing, the dog participates in insightful learning, not rote training. 

    • B. 

      With Capturing, the dog retains the information more profoundly, thus more durably.

    • C. 

      With Capturing, the dog isn't kept guessing - as guessing can be quite frustrating to dogs, this is an advantage. 

    • D. 

      Capturing helps even shy or inhibited dogs feel comfortable with training. 

    • E. 

      Capturing is great for beginner owners, or owners who are impatient for immediate results. 

  • 9. 
    Best Practices: At OhMyDog, we ignore bad behaviour and reward good behaviour. 
    • A. 

      True: That is what we stand for and tell our students. 

    • B. 

      False: This is oversimplistic. 

  • 10. 
    Best Practices: At OhMyDog, we promise our students "Value-Added Training" (VAT). This does NOT mean (pick the one false option with regards to VAT) 
    • A. 

      Pick your battles: Students are free to set their own priorities and to practice at home only exercises that add value to their lives. 

    • B. 

      We have carefully designed our curriculum and ask our students to work equally hard on all exercises in it. 

    • C. 

      Working dog level: For exercises that matter to students, we encourage them to proof the exercise through practice, so that they also work in real-life, and not just with low-distraction environment. 

    • D. 

      Priorities: We always illustrate the everyday use of an exercise. If it can be life-saving (e.g. recall, leave it), we make sure the students understand this using real-life anecdotes.

  • 11. 
    There is always a clear difference between behaviour requiring Behaviour Therapy (Gedragstherapie) and behaviour requiring Obedience Training (Gehoorzaamheid en opvoeding)
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 12. 
    Best Practices: Dog obedience training (gehoorzaamheidstraining) and dog education (opvoeding) are one and the same
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 13. 
    Best Practices: What is Behavioural First Aid?
    • A. 

      A short behaviour therapy consultation on the field, to help owners who can't afford behaviour therapy. We might not be able to help completely (or responsibly) in such a short period of time, but at least they are getting some kimd of help. 

    • B. 

      A mini-behaviour therapy consultation on the field, because most owners sign up to obedience training hoping to get help with behaviour problems. As it is good customer service, we do it eventhough we know it won't cover the problem responsibly in such a short time. 

    • C. 

      Quick tips based on Best Practices, to 'stop the bleeding', to stop the behaviour, the safety and/or the animal welfare problem from getting worse. If more than a few minutes are needed, we advise the owner to send the school an e-mail. 

  • 14. 
    Training Stages: When do we use the expression "Would you bet 50 euros the dog can do it?"
    • A. 

      When the owner 'keeps the dog in kindergarden', asking the dog to perform far below his/her capabilities.

    • B. 

      When the owner gives the dog a command and the dog is incapable of complying (generally because he hasn't been taught the command fluently enough)

  • 15. 
    Training Stages: What is the sweet zone, when it comes a level of difficulty that keeps the dog improving? 
    • A. 

      Really easy, to keep the dog in his comfort zone. 

    • B. 

      Really hard, to keep the dog improving. 

    • C. 

      Challenging, but not impossible

  • 16. 
    Training Stages: The 3 D's of proofing are: 
    • A. 

      Distance (at which distance from you will the dog keep complying?)

    • B. 

      Difficulty (how hard of a situation can the dog handle whilst still performing? - without getting more specific about the various elements of difficulty)

    • C. 

      Duration (how long can the dog keep, say, sitting, when asked?)

    • D. 

      Durability (how long will dog remember the behaviour, over the years)

    • E. 

      Distraction (how intense of a distraction can the dog handle whilst still performing well?)

  • 17. 
    Food in training: What is a million-dollar reward?
    • A. 

      A high-value reward you give when you were certain the dog couldn't do it, and he didn't do it. To keep him encouraged. 

    • B. 

      A high-value reward you give when  you were certain the dog would do it, and he did. When the dog performed effortlessly. 

    • C. 

      When your toes are curling as you were not sure the dog can do it and still he did. 

  • 18. 
    The easier a task is for the dog, the less you reward for it
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 19. 
    Food in training: 'Combat treats' are dogs' favorite food treats (instead of their usual diet). We use them when: 
    • A. 

      The distraction situation is particularly challenging

    • B. 

      The dog is performing effortlessly in the current situation. 

    • C. 

      The dog gets really excited about food treats. 

  • 20. 
    Food in training: The owner tells you their dog has a medicated diet that isn't highly motivating as a reward for the dog. What do you advise? 
    • A. 

      Give the dog Combat treats (e.g. cheese) only on training night. 

    • B. 

      Turn the medicated diet into Combat treats (e.g. make it into a paste, add salmon oil). Get them to ask their vet first. 

    • C. 

      Keep working with the medicated diet, even at the field and even if it means dog and owner are getting frustrated

  • 21. 
    Food in training: How do we decrease the risk of overweight when using food in training? What do we advise the owners? Pick the FALSE answer. 
    • A. 

      Use Combat treats only in highly distracting situations

    • B. 

      Decrease the dog's calorie intake according to how much Combat food he got each day. 

    • C. 

      Weigh the dog's daily ration of his normal food, and mark it in a measuring jar. Fill the jar up to the mark every morning. Take the dog's meals AND the dog's training rewards out of that ration. 

    • D. 

      We don't intervene on matters of nutrition, even if they concern dog training. 

  • 22. 
    Best Practice: What do we mean with "Time for training, time for management"? 
    • A. 

      We mean the owners should ask themselves, before asking the dog to perform in a given situation (training), whether they have the time/patience/desire/head-space to make this a learning moment? 

    • B. 

      We mean that the owners should altogether avoid situations that need improvement.

    • C. 

      We mean that the owners should seek difficult situations to train the dog in, so that he gets used to it. Situations that the dog can't handle at all are better as they lead to more rapid progress. 

  • 23. 
    Best Practice: We say our mantra about "Time for training, time for management" to avoid what? (pick ALL the right answers).  So, pushing the dog in at the deep end, in a situation where you know the dog will fail...
    • A. 

      Will only serve to frustrate dog and handler. 

    • B. 

      Will improve the dog's performance in these difficult situations, but worsen it in easier situations. 

    • C. 

      Will make future performance worse (through sensitisation, among other things). 

  • 24. 
    Best Practices: Management is: 
    • A. 

      Reactive

    • B. 

      Proactive

  • 25. 
    Best Practice: A situation where you can't control the trigger (e.g. other dogs) to the unwanted behaviour (e.g. your own dog barking) is: 
    • A. 

      Time for training

    • B. 

      Time for management

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