Nephrology Quizzes Online & Trivia

A comprehensive database of nephrology quizzes online, test your knowledge with nephrology quiz questions. Our online nephrology trivia quizzes can be adapted to suit your requirements for taking some of the top nephrology quizzes.


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  • Nephrology is a speciality of medicine and paediatrics that concerns itself with the?

  • A physician who has undertaken additional training to become an expert in nephrology may call his or herself a?

  • Nephrology concerns the diagnosis and treatment of kidney diseases, including? 

  • What is Nephrology's major concern in human?
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  • When was the term first used?
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  • What is a physician who specialises in kidney treatment and cure called?
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  • A 35 y/o male without significant PMHx presents to the ED with cough and shortness in breath for one week.  He reports occasional blood tinged sputum.  He denies malaise, weight loss, fevers or joint pain.  On exam, BP is 140/80, pulse is 80, O2 saturation is 97% on ambient air.  Labs show a BUN of 48, creatinine of 3.5 and normal electrolytes.  UA shows 1+ protein, moderate blood, 3-4 RBC casts and 2-3 granular casts per HPF.  CXR shows bilateral infiltrates.  Urine protein/creatinine ratio is 0.6.  ELISA for anti-GBM is positive.  ANCA is not detectable.  Renal biopsy shows crescents in the glomeruli on light microscopy and linear IgG staining along the glomerular capillaries.  What is the best management strategy for this patient?
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  • A 61 y/o woman with HTN, DM2, ischemic cardiomyopathy and chronic renal insufficiency reports pain in her right knee c/w osteoarthritis.  She is prescribed celecoxib 200 mg daily.  After two weeks, she presents to the ED with dyspnea, lower extremity edema and fatigue.  Blood pressure is 188/100 (previously 140/84), BUN is 67, creatinine of 3.9 (baseline 1.9).  What is the mechanism by which the celecoxib caused the acute on chronic renal insufficiency?
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  • Questions #4 and #5 are based on the following case: An 80 y/o female with a hx of depression presents to the ED with weakness and dizziness.  She takes furosemide 20 mg daily for lower extremity edema.  She reports that her PCP placed her on HCTZ 25 mg daily for HTN one week prior.  She denies any fevers, chills, nausea, vomiting, night sweats or rashes.  She is thirstier than usual.  BP laying down is 100/60, dropping to 84/40 on standing.  Lungs are clear.  No edema is noted.      Serum   Urine Osm 260   200 Na 125   50 K 3.4     BUN       Creatinine 0.8       Which of the following is the patient’s most likely diagnosis?
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  • A mother brings her six-month-old son to see you in the emergency department in January. The child had an uneventful prenatal course, and growth and development have been normal to this point. The child is primarily breast fed, but his mother did begin to introduce solids at 4 months of age. The child now presents with emesis and diarrhea of two days duration. She has noted no blood in his stools. In addition, the patient has had several episodes of emesis, and does not seem to have tolerated any oral intake. You inquire about urine output, and the patient s mother reports one wet diaper yesterday and none today. She denies any fevers. The patient does attend day care, and according to his mother, there have been several other children there with a stomach flu. On physical examination, heart rate is 165, and the remainder of the vital signs are within normal limits. Weight is 6.3 kg. The patient weighed 7 kg at his pediatrician s office earlier this week. The patient is crying but consolable with the examination. He appears ill and listless. Eyes appear sunken and lips are dry. The patient is not producing tears with his crying. Anterior fontanel is sunken. The patient s lungs are clear, and auscultation of the heart reveals no murmurs. Capillary refill is 3-4 seconds, but skin turgor appears normal. Examination of the rectal area reveals redness and excoriation. Given the patient s history, you suspect gastroenteritis. You give the pts mother a bottle of oral rehydration solution and instruct her to give the child a teaspoon every 5 minutes. While explaining the instructions to his mother, the child drinks several ounces from his bottle and promptly vomits on you. Of the following, the next best step in this patient s management is:
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  • A 8-year-old female presents to the emergency department with a seizure. On initial evaluation, the patient appears to be post-ictal, but is otherwise okay. Initial vital signs are significant for blood pressure of 180/110. She has never had a seizure before. On further questioning, the patient s parents report that she had several episodes of coca-cola colored urine a few days ago, and was seen by her doctor and given an antibiotic for presumed urinary tract infection. Over the last few days prior to her presentation, she has been complaining of headaches and ankle swelling. Otherwise the patient has been fine. She has never been hospitalized, takes no medications, and she has no known allergies. She is in 3rd grade, and plays soccer in a local league. She is very seldom ill, and with the exception of a sore throat 2 weeks ago, she has had no other recent illnesses. CT of the head is normal. What is the most likely diagnosis?
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  • What would be the most likely urinalysis and laboratory findings in the patient in the previous question?
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