Sword Fencing Terminology - Full Quiz 57 Questions Levels 1-3

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Sword Fencing Terminology - Full Quiz 57 Questions Levels 1-3 - Quiz


Sword fencing terminology quiz using BFA glossary (if required, recommend you open the BFA glossary in different window by using this link)


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Balestra

    • A.

      A short, sharp jump forwards, with both feet and landing with both, usually as a form of preparation

    • B.

      A short, sharp jump backwards, leading with the front foot and landing with both, usually as a form of defence

    • C.

      A short, sharp jump forwards, leading with the front foot and landing with both, usually as a form of preparation

    Correct Answer
    C. A short, sharp jump forwards, leading with the front foot and landing with both, usually as a form of preparation
    Explanation
    The correct answer is a short, sharp jump forwards, leading with the front foot and landing with both, usually as a form of preparation. This explanation accurately describes the balestra as a forward jump where the front foot leads and both feet land together. It also mentions that this jump is typically used as a form of preparation, which aligns with the purpose of the balestra in various disciplines such as fencing and martial arts.

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  • 2. 

    Appel

    • A.

      Beating the piste with the ball of the foot, either as a front foot or rear foot appel

    • B.

      Beating the piste with the rear of the foot, either as a front foot or rear foot appel

    • C.

      Beating the piste with the whole foot, either as a front foot or rear foot appel

    Correct Answer
    A. Beating the piste with the ball of the foot, either as a front foot or rear foot appel
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Beating the piste with the ball of the foot, either as a front foot or rear foot appel." An appel is a technique used in fencing where the fencer stomps their foot on the ground to create a loud noise. This is done to intimidate or distract the opponent. In this case, the correct answer specifies that the piste should be beaten with the ball of the foot, which is the area just behind the toes. It also states that the appel can be done with either the front foot or the rear foot, allowing for flexibility in executing the technique.

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  • 3. 

    Attack

    • A.

      An initial offensive action made by extending the sword arm and continuously threatening the opponent's target area

    • B.

      An initial offensive action made by taking a step forward towards an opponent and continuously threatening the opponent's target area

    • C.

      An initial defensive action made by retracting the sword arm

    Correct Answer
    A. An initial offensive action made by extending the sword arm and continuously threatening the opponent's target area
  • 4. 

    Breaking ground

    • A.

      Stepping forwards

    • B.

      To jump back quickly, evading the opponent's attack

    • C.

      Stepping back

    Correct Answer
    C. Stepping back
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Stepping back." The given phrases "Breaking ground" and "Stepping forwards" suggest a forward movement, while "To jump back quickly, evading the opponent's attack" implies a backward movement. Therefore, the most suitable action to counter the opponent's attack would be stepping back.

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  • 5. 

    Barrage

    • A.

      The first round of a fencing competition

    • B.

      In competition, a fight off to determine a result in the event of a tie

    • C.

      In competition, a one-hit bout to determine a result in the event of a tie

    Correct Answer
    B. In competition, a fight off to determine a result in the event of a tie
    Explanation
    The term "barrage" refers to a fight off that takes place in a competition to determine a result in the event of a tie. This suggests that when two competitors have the same score or performance, they engage in a final round to determine the ultimate winner. This explanation aligns with the context of the term "barrage" in the context of fencing competition.

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  • 6. 

    Compound attack

    • A.

      Two or more single actions performed together as one continuous action

    • B.

      An attack comprising one or more different actions

    • C.

      An attack comprising one or more feints

    Correct Answer
    C. An attack comprising one or more feints
    Explanation
    An attack comprising one or more feints refers to a strategy where a person initiates an attack by making deceptive or false moves to confuse their opponent. Feints are used to create openings or opportunities for a successful attack by misleading the opponent's defensive actions. This type of attack involves the use of cunning and trickery to gain an advantage over the opponent.

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  • 7. 

    Bind 

    • A.

      Taking of the foible of the opposing blade horizontally from quarte to sixte, and vice versa

    • B.

      Taking of the forte of the opposing blade diagonally from high to low line, and vice versa

    • C.

      Taking of the foible of the opposing blade diagonally from high to low line, and vice versa

    Correct Answer
    C. Taking of the foible of the opposing blade diagonally from high to low line, and vice versa
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Taking of the foible of the opposing blade diagonally from high to low line, and vice versa." This answer refers to the technique of binding in fencing. Binding involves taking control of the opponent's blade by deflecting it with the foible (the weaker part of the blade) and moving it diagonally from a high line to a low line, or vice versa. This technique allows the fencer to gain control over the opponent's blade and create an opening for an attack.

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  • 8. 

    Bout 

    • A.

      The final match of a competition

    • B.

      A fight for a specific number of hits

    • C.

      A fight off to determine the result in the event of a tie

    Correct Answer
    B. A fight for a specific number of hits
    Explanation
    A bout refers to a fight or contest in which participants compete against each other, usually in a combat sport. In this context, it specifically refers to a fight for a specific number of hits, where the participants aim to land a certain number of successful strikes on their opponent to win the bout.

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  • 9. 

    Change of engagement 

    • A.

      Initial engagement of the opponent's blade on the opposite side

    • B.

      Maintaining contact with the opponent's blade whilst they change from quarte to sixte (or vice versa)

    • C.

      Re-engagement of the opponent's blade on the opposite side by passing under or over it

    Correct Answer
    C. Re-engagement of the opponent's blade on the opposite side by passing under or over it
    Explanation
    The correct answer is re-engagement of the opponent's blade on the opposite side by passing under or over it. This refers to the action of regaining contact with the opponent's blade after it has been disengaged or changed position. This can be done by either passing the blade under or over it, effectively changing the line of engagement. This technique is commonly used in fencing to gain an advantage over the opponent and create an opportunity for an attack.

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  • 10. 

    Beat

    • A.

      A crisp, striking movement of the opponent's blade creating a deflection, or obtaining a reaction; used as a preparation

    • B.

      A crisp, striking movement with the attacker's forte, creating a deflection, or obtaining a reaction; used as a preparation

    • C.

      A crisp, striking movement of the opponent's forte, creating a deflection, or obtaining a reaction; used as a preparation

    Correct Answer
    A. A crisp, striking movement of the opponent's blade creating a deflection, or obtaining a reaction; used as a preparation
  • 11. 

    Absence of blade

    • A.

      When there is a space between opposing fencers

    • B.

      When swords are not in contact

    • C.

      When the blade is not in line with the opponent's target area

    Correct Answer
    B. When swords are not in contact
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "When swords are not in contact." This means that the absence of blade-to-blade contact between the opposing fencers is the reason for the given statement. In fencing, the swords must make contact with each other to be considered in play. If there is no contact between the swords, it indicates that the fencers are not engaged in a bout or exchange of attacks.

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  • 12. 

    Broken time

    • A.

      Two different attacks, performed with a delay

    • B.

      When a pause is introduced into an action which is normally performed in one movement

    • C.

      The rhythm in which a sequence of movements are made

    Correct Answer
    B. When a pause is introduced into an action which is normally performed in one movement
  • 13. 

    Cadence

    • A.

      When a pause is introduced into an action which is normally performed in one movement

    • B.

      The rhythm in which a sequence of movements are made

    • C.

      Two different attacks, performed with a delay

    Correct Answer
    B. The rhythm in which a sequence of movements are made
  • 14. 

    Ceding parry 

    • A.

      A parry formed while retreating from an opponent who is performing a direct attack

    • B.

      A parry formed by giving way to an opponent who is taking the blade

    • C.

      A parry formed while advancing towards an opponent after they have performed an indirect attack

    Correct Answer
    B. A parry formed by giving way to an opponent who is taking the blade
    Explanation
    Ceding parry is a defensive move in fencing where the fencer gives way to their opponent who is taking the blade. This means that instead of directly blocking or countering the opponent's attack, the fencer moves their blade out of the way, allowing the opponent's blade to pass by. By doing so, the fencer avoids getting hit and creates an opportunity to counterattack. This technique is effective when the opponent's attack is strong and difficult to directly parry or counter.

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  • 15. 

    Change beat 

    • A.

      A beat made after passing under or over the opponent's blade

    • B.

      A beat made after passing to the side of the opponent's blade

    • C.

      An alternate beat of each side of the opponent's blade

    Correct Answer
    A. A beat made after passing under or over the opponent's blade
    Explanation
    A change beat refers to a specific type of beat that is executed after passing under or over the opponent's blade. This technique involves striking the opponent's blade with enough force and precision to change its position or angle. By doing so, the fencer gains an advantage and disrupts the opponent's attack or defense. This move requires skill and timing to successfully execute and can be an effective strategy in fencing.

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  • 16. 

    Circular parry 

    • A.

      Deflection of the opponent's attacking blade by making a circle with the sword point

    • B.

      Deflection of the opponent's attacking blade by making a circle with the forearm

    • C.

      A lateral parry of quarte or sixte, followed by a circular change of engagement

    Correct Answer
    A. Deflection of the opponent's attacking blade by making a circle with the sword point
    Explanation
    The correct answer is: Deflection of the opponent's attacking blade by making a circle with the sword point. This means that when an opponent attacks, the defender uses their sword to create a circular motion, redirecting the attacking blade away from them. By making a circle with the sword point, the defender can effectively parry the attack and protect themselves from harm.

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  • 17. 

    Compound action

    • A.

      No more than two single actions performed together as one continuous action

    • B.

      Two or more single actions performed together as one continuous action

    • C.

      An attack comprising one or more feints

    Correct Answer
    B. Two or more single actions performed together as one continuous action
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Two or more single actions performed together as one continuous action." In compound action, multiple single actions are combined and executed as a single continuous action. This means that two or more separate actions are performed simultaneously or in quick succession, merging them into a single fluid movement. This allows for a more efficient and effective execution of the actions, maximizing their impact and achieving the desired outcome.

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  • 18. 

    Counter attack

    • A.

      A riposte following the successful parry of the opponent's riposte or counter-riposte

    • B.

      The offensive action made while avoiding, or closing the line against, an opponent's attack

    • C.

      The defensive action made while avoiding, or closing the line against, an opponent's attack

    Correct Answer
    B. The offensive action made while avoiding, or closing the line against, an opponent's attack
  • 19. 

    Prises de fer

    • A.

      The taking of the foible of the opponent's blade by making a complete circle and maintaining continual contact throughout

    • B.

      A taking of the blade (e.g. bind, croise, envelopment)

    • C.

      A method of getting closer to an opponent with acceleration to make an attack and while maintaining balance and making it possible for a rapid recovery to On Guard

    Correct Answer
    B. A taking of the blade (e.g. bind, croise, envelopment)
  • 20. 

    Compound Prises de fer

    • A.

      Two (only) consecutive takings of the blade, alike or different, with a break in blade contact

    • B.

      Two or more consecutive takings of the blade, alike or different, with a break in blade contact

    • C.

      Two or more consecutive takings of the blade, alike or different, with no loss of blade contact

    Correct Answer
    C. Two or more consecutive takings of the blade, alike or different, with no loss of blade contact
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Two or more consecutive takings of the blade, alike or different, with no loss of blade contact." This means that the compound prises de fer involve multiple consecutive actions of taking the blade, whether it is the same or different, without any interruption or loss of contact with the opponent's blade. This technique requires precision and control to maintain continuous blade contact throughout the sequence of actions.

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  • 21. 

    Corps a corps

    • A.

      Bodily contact between the fencers in a bout

    • B.

      An engagement of the blades of the fencers in a bout

    • C.

      The engagement of two opponent's fortes

    Correct Answer
    A. Bodily contact between the fencers in a bout
    Explanation
    Corps a corps refers to bodily contact between the fencers in a bout. This term is used in fencing to describe a situation where the fencers come into physical contact with each other during the course of the match. It can happen when the fencers are trying to gain an advantage or when they are attempting to defend themselves. This type of contact is an important aspect of the sport and is often used strategically by the fencers to gain an upper hand in the match.

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  • 22. 

    Counter-disengagement

    • A.

      An indirect action which deceives a change of engagement

    • B.

      A direct action which deceives a change of engagement

    • C.

      The defensive action made while avoiding, or closing the line against, an opponent's attack

    Correct Answer
    A. An indirect action which deceives a change of engagement
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "An indirect action which deceives a change of engagement". This means that counter-disengagement is a tactic used to deceive an opponent by making them believe that there will be a change in engagement, but in reality, the fencer maintains their position and uses this deception to gain an advantage.

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  • 23. 

    Counter-time

    • A.

      An action made by the attacker into a counter attack which is provoked by the opponent

    • B.

      An action made by the defender into a counter attack which is provoked by the opponent

    • C.

      A parry made by the attacker into a counter attack which is provoked by the opponent

    Correct Answer
    A. An action made by the attacker into a counter attack which is provoked by the opponent
    Explanation
    The correct answer is an action made by the attacker into a counter attack which is provoked by the opponent. This means that the attacker is initiating an attack in response to an attack from the opponent. The attacker is using the opponent's attack as an opportunity to counter and potentially gain an advantage in the fight.

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  • 24. 

    Croise

    • A.

      A parry made by the attacker into a counter attack which is provoked by the opponent

    • B.

      The taking of the forte of the opposing blade from high to low line, and vice versa, on the same side as the engagement

    • C.

      The taking of the foible of the opposing blade from high to low line, and vice versa, on the same side as the engagement

    Correct Answer
    C. The taking of the foible of the opposing blade from high to low line, and vice versa, on the same side as the engagement
  • 25. 

    Indirect

    • A.

      An offensive action made by first passing the blade under or over the opponent's blade

    • B.

      A defensive action made by first passing the blade under or over the opponent's blade

    • C.

      An offensive action made by retracting the sword arm in order to renew the attack

    Correct Answer
    A. An offensive action made by first passing the blade under or over the opponent's blade
    Explanation
    The correct answer is an offensive action made by first passing the blade under or over the opponent's blade. This explanation suggests that the action described involves attacking the opponent by maneuvering the blade either under or over their blade. This implies that the attacker is taking an offensive approach to gain an advantage in the fight.

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  • 26. 

    Coule 

    • A.

      The action of retracting the sword arm and grazing lightly down the opponent's blade, maintaining contact throughout

    • B.

      Deflection of the opponent's attacking blade by making a circle with the sword point

    • C.

      The action of extending the sword arm and grazing lightly down the opponent's blade, maintaining contact throughout

    Correct Answer
    C. The action of extending the sword arm and grazing lightly down the opponent's blade, maintaining contact throughout
    Explanation
    The correct answer describes the action of extending the sword arm and grazing lightly down the opponent's blade while maintaining contact throughout. This technique is used in sword fighting to control and redirect the opponent's blade, creating an opportunity for a counterattack. By maintaining contact with the opponent's blade, the swordsman can feel their movements and react accordingly, effectively defending themselves while staying in control of the situation.

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  • 27. 

    Derobement 

    • A.

      Evasion of the opponent's attempt to beat or take the blade while the sword arm is straight and the point is threatening the target

    • B.

      An indirect action made by passing the blade over the opponent's point

    • C.

      Evasion of the opponent's attempt to beat or take the blade while the sword arm is bent and the point is off target

    Correct Answer
    A. Evasion of the opponent's attempt to beat or take the blade while the sword arm is straight and the point is threatening the target
    Explanation
    Derobement refers to the evasion of the opponent's attempt to beat or take the blade while the sword arm is straight and the point is threatening the target. This means that the fencer is able to avoid the opponent's attack by swiftly moving the blade out of the way while maintaining a straight arm and keeping the point of their sword in a position that poses a threat to the opponent. This technique allows the fencer to defend themselves effectively and maintain control over the bout.

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  • 28. 

    Direct

    • A.

      Actions made by passing the blade under or over the opponent's blade

    • B.

      Actions made without passing the blade under or over the opponent's blade

    • C.

      Actions made directly towards the opponent

    Correct Answer
    B. Actions made without passing the blade under or over the opponent's blade
  • 29. 

    Disengagement

    • A.

      Indirect action made by passing the blade under or over the opponent's blade

    • B.

      Direct action made by passing the blade under or over the opponent's blade

    • C.

      A break of engagement from the opponent's blade

    Correct Answer
    A. Indirect action made by passing the blade under or over the opponent's blade
  • 30. 

    Double 

    • A.

      A direct attack which deceives the opponent's circular parry

    • B.

      A compound attack which deceives the opponent's circular parry

    • C.

      An indirect attack which deceives the opponent's circular parry

    Correct Answer
    B. A compound attack which deceives the opponent's circular parry
  • 31. 

    Feint

    • A.

      Threatening movement of the blade made with the intention of provoking a parry or similar response

    • B.

      An action made by the attacker into a counter attack which is provoked by the opponent

    • C.

      A direct attack which deceives the opponent's circular parry

    Correct Answer
    A. Threatening movement of the blade made with the intention of provoking a parry or similar response
  • 32. 

    Double action 

    • A.

      When both fencers choose exactly the same moment to make an offensive action

    • B.

      When both fencers choose exactly the same moment to disengage

    • C.

      When both fencers step forward simultaneously

    Correct Answer
    A. When both fencers choose exactly the same moment to make an offensive action
  • 33. 

    Cut-over (coupe) 

    • A.

      A direct action made by passing the blade over the opponent's point

    • B.

      An indirect action made by passing the blade over the opponent's point

    • C.

      An indirect action made by passing the blade over the opponent's forte

    Correct Answer
    B. An indirect action made by passing the blade over the opponent's point
  • 34. 

    Compound riposte

    • A.

      Riposte comprising one or more feints

    • B.

      Riposte comprising two feints

    • C.

      A compound attack which deceives the opponent's simple parry

    Correct Answer
    A. Riposte comprising one or more feints
  • 35. 

    Quarte 

    • A.

      High line, semi-supinated guard on the non-sword-arm side

    • B.

      High line, pronated guard on the non-sword-arm side

    • C.

      Low line, semi-supinated guard on the non-sword-arm side

    Correct Answer
    A. High line, semi-supinated guard on the non-sword-arm side
  • 36. 

    Envelopment

    • A.

      The taking of the foible of the opponent's blade by making a complete circle and maintaining continual contact throughout

    • B.

      The taking of the forte of the opponent's blade by making a complete circle and maintaining continual contact throughout

    • C.

      The taking of the foible of the opponent's blade by maintaining continual contact throughout

    Correct Answer
    A. The taking of the foible of the opponent's blade by making a complete circle and maintaining continual contact throughout
  • 37. 

    High / low lines

    • A.

      High and low divisions of the target area above and below a theoretical line

    • B.

      High and low divisions of the fencer's whole body area above and below a theoretical line

    • C.

      The terms used to group different parries into both high and low

    Correct Answer
    A. High and low divisions of the target area above and below a theoretical line
    Explanation
    This answer refers to the high and low divisions of the target area above and below a theoretical line. It means that the target area is divided into two sections, with the upper section being the high division and the lower section being the low division. This division helps in identifying and aiming at specific areas of the target during fencing.

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  • 38. 

    Development

    • A.

      Extension of the sword arm accompanied by a balestra

    • B.

      Extension of the sword arm accompanied by the lunge

    • C.

      Extension of the sword arm accompanied by a fleche

    Correct Answer
    B. Extension of the sword arm accompanied by the lunge
  • 39. 

    Opposition

    • A.

      A blade movement, maintaining constant contact with the opponent's blade

    • B.

      A blade movement, maintaining intermittent contact with the opponent's blade

    • C.

      A blade movement, maintaining forte to forte contact with the opponent's blade

    Correct Answer
    A. A blade movement, maintaining constant contact with the opponent's blade
  • 40. 

    Pronation   

    • A.

      The position of the sword hand with the knuckles uppermost

    • B.

      The position of the sword hand with the palm uppermost

    • C.

      The position of the non-sword hand with the knuckles uppermost

    Correct Answer
    A. The position of the sword hand with the knuckles uppermost
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "The position of the sword hand with the knuckles uppermost." Pronation refers to the rotation of the hand or forearm so that the palm faces downwards or towards the ground. In the context of sword fighting, pronation would mean holding the sword with the knuckles facing upwards.

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  • 41. 

    The renewal of an action made with a lunge by first returning to guard forwards or backwards

    • A.

      Remise

    • B.

      Reprise

    • C.

      Redoublement

    Correct Answer
    B. Reprise
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Reprise". In fencing, a reprise refers to the renewal of an action made with a lunge by first returning to guard forwards or backwards. This means that after making a lunge, the fencer returns to their starting position before continuing with another attack or action. The term "reprise" is used to describe this specific sequence of movements in fencing.

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  • 42. 

    Part-whole method

    • A.

      The teaching of a movement by practising it in isolation

    • B.

      The teaching of a movement in parts, ie isolating the parts of the movement demanding most skill and practising them in isolation; then putting the parts together to make a whole movement

    • C.

      The teaching of a single part of a movement in reference to the final outcome

    Correct Answer
    B. The teaching of a movement in parts, ie isolating the parts of the movement demanding most skill and practising them in isolation; then putting the parts together to make a whole movement
    Explanation
    The correct answer explains the concept of the part-whole method in teaching movement. It involves breaking down a movement into its individual parts, focusing on the parts that require the most skill, and practicing them separately. Once each part is mastered, they are then combined to create the complete movement. This method allows for a more focused and targeted approach to learning complex movements, ensuring that each part is fully understood and mastered before attempting the whole movement.

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  • 43. 

    Prime

    • A.

      High line, pronated guard on the sword-arm side

    • B.

      High line, pronated guard on the non-sword-arm side

    • C.

      Low line, pronated guard on the non-sword-arm side

    Correct Answer
    B. High line, pronated guard on the non-sword-arm side
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "High line, pronated guard on the non-sword-arm side." In fencing, the guard refers to the position of the fencer's non-sword-arm. A pronated guard means that the palm of the hand is facing downward. The high line refers to the upper part of the target area, which is above the waist. Therefore, the correct answer suggests that the fencer should have their non-sword-arm in a pronated guard position on the side opposite to their sword-arm, while focusing on the high line as the target area.

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  • 44. 

    Priority 

    • A.

      The right of way gained by the fencer at foil, sabre and epee by extending the sword arm and continually threatening the opponent's target

    • B.

      The right of way gained by the fencer at foil and sabre by extending the sword arm and performing a direct attack

    • C.

      The right of way gained by the fencer at foil and sabre by extending the sword arm and continually threatening the opponent's target

    Correct Answer
    C. The right of way gained by the fencer at foil and sabre by extending the sword arm and continually threatening the opponent's target
    Explanation
    The correct answer explains that in foil and sabre fencing, the fencer gains the right of way by extending the sword arm and continually threatening the opponent's target. This means that the fencer who is constantly attacking and keeping their opponent on the defensive has the priority in scoring points. By extending the sword arm and maintaining a continuous threat, the fencer maintains control and has the advantage in the match.

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  • 45. 

    Progressive actions 

    • A.

      Actions made with the sword point continually moving towards the opponent's target

    • B.

      A renewal of the same single action whilst moving towards the opponent's target

    • C.

      The movement of blade or foot to obtain the best position from which to make an attack

    Correct Answer
    A. Actions made with the sword point continually moving towards the opponent's target
    Explanation
    The correct answer is actions made with the sword point continually moving towards the opponent's target. This means that the person using the sword is constantly advancing towards their target while maintaining the forward movement of the sword. This strategy allows for a more aggressive and continuous attack, making it harder for the opponent to defend or counterattack. It also ensures that the attacker maintains control of the fight and keeps the pressure on their opponent.

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  • 46. 

    Low line, semi-supinated guard on the non-sword-arm side

    • A.

      Quinte

    • B.

      Septime

    • C.

      Seconde

    Correct Answer
    B. Septime
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Septime. In fencing, the term "low line" refers to the area below the opponent's waist. A "semi-supinated guard" means that the hand is rotated slightly outward. When the guard is on the non-sword-arm side, it is known as "septime". Therefore, the correct answer is Septime.

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  • 47. 

    Supination 

    • A.

      The position of the sword hand with the knuckle uppermost

    • B.

      The position of the non-sword hand with the finger-nail uppermost

    • C.

      The position of the sword hand with the finger-nail uppermost

    Correct Answer
    C. The position of the sword hand with the finger-nail uppermost
    Explanation
    Supination refers to the position of the hand where the palm is facing upward or forward, and the thumb is pointing away from the body. In this case, the correct answer states that supination is the position of the sword hand with the finger-nail uppermost. This means that the hand holding the sword is in a supinated position, with the palm facing upward and the thumb pointing away from the body.

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  • 48. 

    Quinte

    • A.

      Low line, pronated guard on the non-sword-arm side at foil

    • B.

      Low line, semi-supinated guard on the non-sword-arm side at foil

    • C.

      High line, pronated guard on the non-sword-arm side at foil

    Correct Answer
    A. Low line, pronated guard on the non-sword-arm side at foil
    Explanation
    This answer is correct because in fencing, the term "quinte" refers to a specific position or guard. In this case, it is described as a low line guard with the non-sword-arm side pronated. This means that the fencer's arm is rotated so that the palm is facing downwards. This guard is commonly used in foil fencing to protect the lower body and create opportunities for attacks.

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  • 49. 

    The renewal of an action after being parried by replacing the point on the target in a different line to the original action

    • A.

      Redoublement

    • B.

      Disengagement

    • C.

      Rassemblement

    Correct Answer
    A. Redoublement
    Explanation
    Redoublement refers to the renewal of an action after being parried by replacing the point on the target in a different line to the original action. This technique is often used in fencing to deceive the opponent and create an opportunity for a successful attack. Disengagement, on the other hand, refers to changing the line of the attack by maneuvering around the opponent's blade. Rassemblement is not related to the given explanation and is therefore not the correct answer.

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  • 50. 

    Tierce 

    • A.

      High line, pronated guard on the sword-arm side

    • B.

      High line, supinated guard on the sword-arm side

    • C.

      Low line, pronated guard on the sword-arm side

    Correct Answer
    A. High line, pronated guard on the sword-arm side
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "High line, pronated guard on the sword-arm side." This means that the guard position is held on the side of the sword-arm in a pronated (palm facing down) position, and it is used to defend against attacks in the high line. The high line refers to the upper body area that is vulnerable to attacks, such as the head or upper torso. By using a pronated guard on the sword-arm side, the fighter can effectively protect themselves against high line attacks.

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Quiz Review Timeline +

Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Oct 10, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Feb 02, 2009
    Quiz Created by
    Dasser
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