Cognition Trivia Quiz For Psychology Students!

23 Questions | Total Attempts: 305

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Cognition Quizzes & Trivia

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    One study found that if participants were told a new fact about robins they would also believe that the new fact was true of ducks. However, if told a new fact about ducks, participants would not extrapolate this information to robins. This suggests that ________.
    • A. 

      Participants treat each category member independently (on a case-by-case basis) when applying new beliefs

    • B. 

      Participants are willing to make inferences from a typical case within a category to the whole category but not vice versa

    • C. 

      New knowledge about a member of a category is unstable, leading to a change in a person’s belief system only on rare occasions

    • D. 

      Beliefs within a theory are less likely to affect typical category members than atypical ones

  • 2. 
    Categorization is of great importance to cognitive tasks. Which of the following is LEAST likely to benefit from the ability to categorize?
    • A. 

      Learning new information

    • B. 

      Expanding current knowledge

    • C. 

      Generalizing to new situations

    • D. 

      Improving IQ

  • 3. 
    Studies of moment-by-moment brain activity indicate that ________.
    • A. 

      The activity of visualization produces widespread activation of the brain, particularly in the left hemisphere

    • B. 

      The brain regions needed for visualization are distinct from the brain regions needed for actual vision

    • C. 

      When participants are visualizing, activity levels are high in brain regions also crucial for visual perception

    • D. 

      Different people employ different brain areas to support their visualizing

  • 4. 
    “Coarticulation” refers to the fact that, in producing speech ________.
    • A. 

      The movement of the tongue and lips must be carefully coordinated with the output of air from the lungs

    • B. 

      Phonemes overlap, both in their production and in their sound pattern

    • C. 

      A single position of the tongue is used for several different speech sounds

    • D. 

      The tongue must be moved into its appropriate position simultaneously with the positioning of the teeth and lips

  • 5. 
    The term “categorical perception” refers to the fact that we are ________.
    • A. 

      Better at hearing some categories of sounds than we are at hearing other categories

    • B. 

      Skillful both in identifying categories of sounds and in categorizing the physical characteristics of those sounds

    • C. 

      Better at hearing the difference between sounds from different categories than we are at distinguishing sounds from the same category

    • D. 

      Highly sensitive to variations within a category but are less sensitive to the contrast between categories

  • 6. 
    The principle of minimal attachment refers to a ________.
    • A. 

      Rule of conversation governing how successive statements within a conversation are related to each other

    • B. 

      Principle of speech perception determining the connection between adjacent phonemes

    • C. 

      Heuristic used to determine the referent of pronouns within a sentence

    • D. 

      Processing strategy in which the listener seeks the simplest possible phrase structure that will accommodate the words heard to that point

  • 7. 
    Stephen and Stephanie both have problems with speech. Stephen’s disorder is characterized with speech such as “Um . . . the . . . ahhh . . . I want . . . green . . . it’s green . . . .” Stephanie’s disorder is characterized with speech such as “It is easy because . . . boys are looking but they look . . . see the cat is with the boys and machines and purple.” Stephen is most likely suffering from ________ while Stephanie is suffering from ________.
    • A. 

      Wernicke’s aphasia; Broca’s aphasia

    • B. 

      Wernicke’s aphasia; specific language impairment

    • C. 

      Broca’s aphasia; Wernicke’s aphasia

    • D. 

      Broca’s aphasia; anomia

  • 8. 
    A researcher asks a participant to memorize a city map. On the map, the library and the school are 2 inches apart; the school and the hospital are 4 inches apart. The researcher now instructs the participant to form an image of the map and to scan from the library to the school. The researcher then asks the participant to scan from the school to the hospital. Which of the following is MOST likely to be true?
    • A. 

      The scanning time from the school to the hospital is half the scanning time between the library and the school.

    • B. 

      The scanning time from the school to the hospital is triple the scanning time between the library and the school.

    • C. 

      The scanning time from the school to the hospital is the same as the scanning time between the library and the school.

    • D. 

      The scanning time from the school to the hospital is double the scanning time between the library and the school.

  • 9. 
    To produce some sounds, the flow of air out of the lungs is interrupted by the lips; for other sounds, the flow is disrupted by the placement of the tongue and teeth. This feature of sound production is referred to as ________.
    • A. 

      Place of articulation

    • B. 

      Manner of production

    • C. 

      Voicing

    • D. 

      Speech locus

  • 10. 
    People tend to be more alert and responsive to evidence that supports their preexisting notions and beliefs than to evidence that challenges them. This effect is called ________.
    • A. 

      Confirmation bias

    • B. 

      Stereotypy

    • C. 

      Base-rate error

    • D. 

      The covariation law

  • 11. 
    When asked to determine which city is farther south, Seattle or Montreal, people are likely to mistakenly say Seattle. This is probably because ________.
    • A. 

      People depend on their “gut feelings” when they don’t know an answer

    • B. 

      Some spatial information is stored in memory in a propositional form rather than an image form

    • C. 

      People are great at reading visual images and can discover surprising facts in them

    • D. 

      People are miserably bad at reading visual images, and so images are no help in this type of problem

  • 12. 
    The term “illusory covariation” refers to an error in which ________.
    • A. 

      Participants perceive an event as occurring far more often than it actually does

    • B. 

      Participants perceive two variables as being somehow linked to each other when in fact they are not

    • C. 

      Participants draw a conclusion on the basis of a biased or small sample of evidence

    • D. 

      Participants refuse to change their minds even though the available evidence clearly challenges their belief

  • 13. 
    In a memory experiment, participants were shown a form that could be interpreted in more than one way. Half the participants were told, “Here is a picture of the sun.” Other participants were told, “Here is a picture of a ship’s steering wheel.” Some time later, participants were asked to draw the exact form they had seen earlier. The data indicate that ________.
    • A. 

      Participants’ visual memories were distinct from their verbal memories, so participants were uninfluenced by the labels

    • B. 

      Participants’ drawings were biased in a fashion that reflected the labels that the participants had been given earlier

    • C. 

      The labels had called attention to the ambiguity of the figures, leading to improved memory accuracy

    • D. 

      Participants were able to remember only the labels, not the drawings

  • 14. 
    The process of “slicing” the stream of speech into successive syllables or words is called ________.
    • A. 

      Sound segregation

    • B. 

      Speech segmentation

    • C. 

      Categorical perception

    • D. 

      Articulation

  • 15. 
    The concept of boundary extension illustrates that ________.
    • A. 

      People understand a picture by means of a perceptual schema

    • B. 

      Schemas influence memory for images, but not as much as they influence memory for verbal information

    • C. 

      People remember pictures in a “zoomed-in” manner

    • D. 

      Semantic knowledge has no influence on memory for images

  • 16. 
    An inductive judgment is one in which a person ________.
    • A. 

      Tries to make predictions about upcoming events on the basis of evidence already available

    • B. 

      Tries to make a cause-and-effect judgment about an observed state of affairs

    • C. 

      Begins with a general statement and asks what other specific claims follow from this

    • D. 

      Begins with specific facts or observations and seeks to draw a general conclusion from them

  • 17. 
    A normative account is one that ________.
    • A. 

      Describes how things typically proceed

    • B. 

      Describes the data with no evaluation or judgment

    • C. 

      Indicates how things are supposed to proceed

    • D. 

      Indicates the pattern of the data, averaging across minor case-by-case variations

  • 18. 
    Heuristics are strategies that ________.
    • A. 

      Sometimes risk error in order to gain efficiency

    • B. 

      Are underused, despite their advantages

    • C. 

      Protect us from overestimating the frequency of real-life events

    • D. 

      Ensure step-by-step procedures for finding correct conclusions

  • 19. 
    When we encounter a highly unusual event, we are particularly likely to notice and consider the event. As a consequence ________.
    • A. 

      We are likely to think about how distinctive the event really is, leading us to underestimate the likelihood of this type of event

    • B. 

      We are likely to think about the event as being in its own special category, and so the event will have little impact on our estimates of frequency

    • C. 

      The event will be easy to recall, leading us to overestimate the likelihood of this type of event

    • D. 

      The event will be difficult to recall, leading us to underestimate the likelihood of this type of event

  • 20. 
    Which of the following is an example of the gambler’s fallacy?
    • A. 

      “I know the chances of winning the lottery are small, but someone has to win it, and I could be the one!”

    • B. 

      “I’ve gotten a low number the last eight times I’ve rolled the dice, so a high number is coming up soon!”

    • C. 

      “There’s an equal chance for any team to win the league’s championship.”

    • D. 

      “The best strategy at the horse races is to bet in the same way as the crowd is betting.”

  • 21. 
    The smallest units of language that carry meaning are called ________.
    • A. 

      Morphemes

    • B. 

      phonemes

    • C. 

      Phonetic elements

    • D. 

      Words

  • 22. 
    Linguistic rules seem to be the source of children’s overregularization errors. This sort of error is visible, for example, whenever a child ________.
    • A. 

      Uses a regular sequence of words to express an idea even though a different sequence would be more effective

    • B. 

      Sees a squirrel and says, “There’s a cat!”

    • C. 

      Says “I goed” or “He runned”

    • D. 

      Fails to distinguish between similar speech sounds

  • 23. 
    Chronometric studies ________.
    • A. 

      Are time-measuring techniques used to record how long it takes to fulfill a mental process

    • B. 

      Have been relatively uninformative for the study of complex mental events

    • C. 

      Have documented the descriptive (languagelike) properties of mental imagery

    • D. 

      Require an understanding of the brain events underlying a particular mental function