How Much Do You Know About Cognition? Trivia Quiz

25 Questions | Total Attempts: 358

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Cognition Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    A patient has suffered brain damage and, as a result, now seems to ignore all information on the left side of her world. If shown words, she reads only the right half of the word; if asked to copy a picture, she copies only the right half. This patient seems to be suffering from:
    • A. 

      A hemispherectomy

    • B. 

      Right hemiblindness

    • C. 

      The unilateral neglect syndrome

    • D. 

      Parietal syndrome

  • 2. 
    Tasks involving dichotic listening are tasks in which:
    • A. 

      Two different visual stimuli are presented

    • B. 

      Two different auditory messages are presented, one to each ear

    • C. 

      Participants must identify subthreshold sounds

    • D. 

      Participants must dichotomize sounds into distinct categories

  • 3. 
    A researcher hypothesizes that high doses of caffeine can produce state-dependent learning. To confirm this hypothesis, the researcher would need to show that:
    • A. 

      Participants learn more effectively if they drink several cups of coffee before studying the material to be learned

    • B. 

      Participants’ recall performance is improved if they are tested soon after drinking several cups of coffee

    • C. 

      Participants who drink a lot of coffee are, in general, likely to do better on memory tests

    • D. 

      If participants studied the material after drinking a great deal of coffee, they will remember the material better if they drink a great deal of coffee just before taking the memory test

  • 4. 
    In a study of visual selection, participants were shown a video of people throwing and catching a ball. Some of the people were wearing white shirts and some were wearing black. Participants were asked to attend only to the group of people wearing white shirts and count the number of times they threw the ball. In this study, participants:
    • A. 

      Could not ignore the participants wearing black

    • B. 

      Reported the total number of times the ball changed hands regardless of whether it was thrown by a person wearing a white shirt or a person wearing a black shirt

    • C. 

      Reported the number of throws made by the people wearing black shirts 50% of the time

    • D. 

      Easily completed the task, but in the process failed to notice some other peculiar events that occurred

  • 5. 
    A key difference between incidental and intentional learning is the degree to which information is distributed
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 6. 
    Participants are shown a pair of similar pictures separated by a blank interval. The pictures are identical except for one single aspect (e.g., a man is wearing a hat in one scene but not in the other). In these kinds of tasks participants often find it hard to detect the change. This phenomenon is known as change:
    • A. 

      Identification

    • B. 

      Perception

    • C. 

      Blindness

    • D. 

      Unawareness

  • 7. 
    The idea of a “cognitive budget” is used several times in this chapter. Which of the following statements is NOT true of the “cognitive budget”?
    • A. 

      One can only perform multiple tasks if the sum of the tasks’ demands do not exceed the budget.

    • B. 

      The budget can increase through practice

    • C. 

      Tasks may require fewer resources through practice.

    • D. 

      The budget contains task specific and task-general resources.

  • 8. 
    Week after week, Solomon watched his favorite TV show. He never planned to memorize the characters’ names, and he never took any steps to memorize the names. Nonetheless, he soon knew all of the characters’ names. This sort of learning is called:
    • A. 

      Elaborative

    • B. 

      Intentional

    • C. 

      Accidental

    • D. 

      Incidental

  • 9. 
    Which of the following is NOT an attribute of working memory (sometimes called short-term memory)?
    • A. 

      Unlimited storage capacity

    • B. 

      Drawn on by a wide range of tasks

    • C. 

      Easily accessible

    • D. 

      Contents closely associated with the current focus of attention

  • 10. 
    The generation effect suggests that you will do better on an exam when you are actively involved in taking notes during class and putting the lectures into your own words than on a test for which you were given the instructor’s PowerPoint presentations.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 11. 
    Because of the effects of state-dependent learning, students might find it wise to:
    • A. 

      Use mnemonic devices as a study aid

    • B. 

      Study only when they are entirely sober

    • C. 

      Focus on their instructor’s intended meaning rather than on the instructor’s exact words

    • D. 

      Prepare for their examinations under conditions similar to the test conditions

  • 12. 
    Early estimates of working-memory’s capacity relied on the so-called digit-span task. The data indicate working memory’s capacity to be:
    • A. 

      10 to 14 items

    • B. 

      2 or 3 items

    • C. 

      Around 20 items

    • D. 

      Around 7 items

  • 13. 
    The helper that stores visual materials is called the:
    • A. 

      Visuospatial buffer

    • B. 

      Rehearsal loop

    • C. 

      Visuo-central executive

    • D. 

      Spatial image icon

  • 14. 
    Data indicate that, all things equal, recall performance will be BEST if materials are encoded with _____ processing.
    • A. 

      Shallow

    • B. 

      Intermediate

    • C. 

      Deep

    • D. 

      Sensory

  • 15. 
    Learning that occurs not as a result of a purposeful attempt but as a by-product of performing a task is intentional learning.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 16. 
    Deep processing may lead to improved memory performance because it facilitates retrieval. How exactly does this happen?
    • A. 

      Deep processing leads many connections between the current item and previous knowledge to be formed.

    • B. 

      Deep processing leads items to be kept in working memory.

    • C. 

      Deep processing encourages use of mnemonics.

    • D. 

      Deep processing leads to fewer retrieval paths, making the correct path more easy to access.

  • 17. 
    In an experiment participants learned materials in Room A and were tested in Room B. If they were asked to think about Room A just before taking the test, participants:
    • A. 

      Performed as well as they would have done had there been no room change

    • B. 

      Performed worse on the test due to dual-task memory disruption

    • C. 

      Performed the same as those participants who were not asked to think about Room A

    • D. 

      Performed better than participants who were tested in Room B and were not asked to think about Room A, but worse than participants tested in Room A

  • 18. 
    Participants are asked to memorize a list of words. In addition to the words themselves, participants will remember some aspects of the context in which the words appeared. This tendency to remember a stimulus within its context is referred to as:
    • A. 

      Background learning

    • B. 

      Multiple encoding

    • C. 

      Implicit memory

    • D. 

      Encoding specificity

  • 19. 
    Patients with damage to the pulvinar tend to have difficulties engaging attention
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 20. 
    A participant is asked to memorize a series of word pairs, including the pair “heavy–light.” The participant is asked later if any of the following words had been included in the list memorized earlier: “lamp,” “candle,” “spark,” and “light.” The participant denies having seen any of these words recently. This is probably because:
    • A. 

      The learning context does not provide adequate support for perceptual encoding

    • B. 

      The learning context does relatively little to encourage deep processing

    • C. 

      What was memorized was the idea of “light” as a description of weight, not “light” as illumination

    • D. 

      The learning context led the participant to think in terms of opposites, while the test context led the participant to think in terms of semantic associates

  • 21. 
    Cramming the night before an exam is an example of distributed practice.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 22. 
    Patients with frontal lobe lesions often show a pattern of goal:
    • A. 

      Aphasia—being unable to construct a verbal description of the task at hand

    • B. 

      Neglect—relying on habitual responses even if it does not help the goal at hand

    • C. 

      Agnosia—confusing instructions of a task

    • D. 

      Amnesia—forgetting about the goal at hand

  • 23. 
    The strategy of maintenance rehearsal involves:
    • A. 

      The repetition of the items to be remembered and the simultaneous consideration of the items’ meaning

    • B. 

      A focus on the associations between the items to be remembered and other thoughts and ideas

    • C. 

      Paying attention to the sequence of items, independent of their meaning

    • D. 

      The repetition of the items to be remembered with little attention paid to what the items mean

  • 24. 
    You have to remember of new phone number. Instead of remembering each of the seven digits individually (5-5-5-1-2-1-2), you remember two numbers (555-1212). This is an example of consolidation.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 25. 
    When asked to recall a list of 25 words, participants are likely to remember only some of them. The words recalled are likely to include:
    • A. 

      The last 12 or so words on the list

    • B. 

      The first few words on the list, and also the last six or so words on the list

    • C. 

      The first 12 or so words on the list

    • D. 

      Words drawn from positions scattered throughout the list

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