Ultimate Psychology Quiz On Cognition

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Ultimate Psychology Quiz On Cognition - Quiz

Do you understand cognition in psychology? With this ultimate psychology quiz on cognition, you can test your knowledge. It is the mental action or process of getting knowledge and understanding through experience, thoughts, and the senses. If you know all this well, you can practice your skills here. Go for it, and see how much you know and what more you need to learn. All the best for a perfect score here! Do not forget to share the quiz with other psychology aspirants.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What is fundamental to our ability to think?

    • A.

      Category

    • B.

      Concept

    • C.

      Judging

    • D.

      Valuing

    Correct Answer
    B. Concept
    Explanation
    Concepts are fundamental to our ability to think because they are mental representations of categories or ideas that allow us to organize and understand information. Concepts help us to make sense of the world by grouping similar things together and distinguishing them from others. They enable us to recognize patterns, make connections, and form generalizations. Without concepts, our thinking would be disorganized and fragmented, making it difficult to understand and communicate effectively. Therefore, concepts play a crucial role in our cognitive processes and are essential for our ability to think.

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  • 2. 

    Features that appear to be characteristic of category members but may not be possessed by every member is what theory?

    • A.

      Family alike theory

    • B.

      Family difference theory

    • C.

      Family resemblance theory

    • D.

      Theory of twins

    Correct Answer
    C. Family resemblance theory
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Family resemblance theory. This theory suggests that certain features may appear to be characteristic of category members, but not every member possesses all of these features. Instead, members of a category share a family resemblance, meaning they have overlapping similarities and characteristics. This theory challenges the traditional view that categories are defined by a set of necessary and sufficient features, and instead emphasizes the importance of similarity and resemblance among category members.

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  • 3. 

    One thing in the group contains all the characteristics or critical features. 

    • A.

      Resemblance theory

    • B.

      Prototype theory

    • C.

      Generic theory

    • D.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    B. Prototype theory
    Explanation
    Prototype theory suggests that one thing in a group contains all the characteristics or critical features. This theory proposes that individuals categorize objects and concepts based on their similarity to a prototype or typical example. The prototype represents the most salient or representative features of a category, and other members of the category are judged based on their resemblance to this prototype. This theory helps explain how people form categories and make judgments about similarities and differences between objects or concepts.

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  • 4. 

    What is the term given to "grouping things together based on shared characteristics"?

    • A.

      Grouping

    • B.

      Separating

    • C.

      Categorization

    • D.

      Secluding

    Correct Answer
    C. Categorization
    Explanation
    Categorization is the term given to grouping things together based on shared characteristics. It involves organizing and classifying items or concepts into specific categories or groups based on their similarities. This process allows for easier understanding, organization, and analysis of information or objects by identifying common traits and relationships among them.

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  • 5. 

    When objects are compared to all category members, it is what theory?

    • A.

      Resemblance theory

    • B.

      Exemplar theory

    • C.

      Prototype theory

    • D.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    B. Exemplar theory
    Explanation
    Exemplar theory suggests that when objects are compared to all category members, the comparison is made based on specific examples or instances that are stored in memory. According to this theory, we categorize objects by comparing them to specific exemplars rather than relying on a single prototype or abstract representation. This theory emphasizes the role of individual experiences and variability within categories.

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  • 6. 

    What theory is represented by (likelihood of something happening) X (value of that outcome)?

    • A.

      Irrational choice theory

    • B.

      Rational choice theory

    • C.

      Gamblers theory

    • D.

      Chance theory

    Correct Answer
    B. Rational choice theory
    Explanation
    The theory represented by (likelihood of something happening) X (value of that outcome) is rational choice theory. This theory suggests that individuals make decisions based on a rational evaluation of the likelihood of an outcome and the value or utility attached to that outcome. In other words, people weigh the probability of an event occurring against the potential benefits or costs associated with it in order to make rational choices.

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  • 7. 

    A fast and efficient strategy that may facilitate decision-making but does not guarantee that a solution will be reached is what?

    • A.

      Heuristics

    • B.

      Algorithms

    • C.

      Rational choice theory

    • D.

      Irrational theory

    Correct Answer
    A. Heuristics
    Explanation
    Heuristics are a fast and efficient strategy that can help in decision-making. They are mental shortcuts or rules of thumb that allow individuals to make judgments and solve problems quickly. However, while heuristics can be helpful, they do not guarantee that a solution will be reached. This is because heuristics are based on simplifications and generalizations, which can sometimes lead to errors or biases in decision-making. Therefore, heuristics can be a useful tool, but they should be used with caution and combined with other decision-making strategies to ensure a more accurate and reliable outcome.

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  • 8. 

    Shortcut that involves making a probability judgment by comparing an object or event to a prototype of the object or event. 

    • A.

      Heuristics

    • B.

      Conjunction fallacy

    • C.

      Availability bias

    • D.

      Representativeness heuristic

    Correct Answer
    D. Representativeness heuristic
    Explanation
    The correct answer is representativeness heuristic. The representativeness heuristic is a mental shortcut that involves making a probability judgment by comparing an object or event to a prototype of the object or event. It is based on the assumption that if something resembles a typical example of a category, it is likely to belong to that category. This heuristic can lead to errors in judgment when individuals rely too heavily on stereotypes or fail to consider other relevant information.

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  • 9. 

    Decreasing the probability of all things being true of a person

    • A.

      Conjunction fallacy

    • B.

      Availability bias

    • C.

      Representativeness heuristic

    • D.

      Heuristic

    Correct Answer
    A. Conjunction fallacy
    Explanation
    The given correct answer is "conjunction fallacy." This refers to the tendency to believe that the co-occurrence of two specific events is more likely than the occurrence of a single event, even when the latter is more probable. In this case, the statement "decreasing the probability of all things being true of a person" is an example of the conjunction fallacy because it implies that multiple things being true of a person is less likely than just one thing being true.

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  • 10. 

    Items that are more readily available in memory are judged as having occurred more frequently 

    • A.

      Conjunction fallacy

    • B.

      Availability bias

    • C.

      Heurisitics

    • D.

      Representativeness heuristic

    Correct Answer
    B. Availability bias
    Explanation
    The given correct answer is availability bias. This bias occurs when people rely on information that is easily available in their memory to make judgments or decisions. In this case, the statement suggests that items that are more readily available in memory are judged as having occurred more frequently. This is an example of availability bias because the judgment is based on the ease with which the information comes to mind, rather than on actual frequency or probability.

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  • 11. 

    The frequency or likelihood of an event occurring is what term below 

    • A.

      Heuristics

    • B.

      Availability bias

    • C.

      Conjunction fallacy

    • D.

      Base rate

    Correct Answer
    D. Base rate
    Explanation
    The term that refers to the frequency or likelihood of an event occurring is base rate. Base rate refers to the general probability of an event happening based on historical data or prior knowledge, without considering specific details or circumstances. It provides a starting point or baseline for estimating the probability of an event, and is an important factor in decision-making and statistical reasoning.

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  • 12. 

    What is the term for people giving different answers to the problem depending on how the problem is phrased?

    • A.

      Sunk-cost fallacy

    • B.

      Heuristics

    • C.

      Availability bias

    • D.

      Framing effects

    Correct Answer
    D. Framing effects
    Explanation
    Framing effects refer to the phenomenon where people give different answers to a problem depending on how the problem is presented or phrased. This suggests that the way information is framed can influence decision-making and judgments. It highlights the importance of how information is presented in shaping our perceptions and choices.

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  • 13. 

    You have invested 100 dollars on an outdoor concert ticket. On the day of the concert, it pours rain, and you are now faced with a decision to go to the concert and get all muddy or stay home. Either way, your 100 dollars is wasted. This is an example of what?

    • A.

      Framing effects

    • B.

      Availability bias

    • C.

      Sunk-cost fallacy

    • D.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    C. Sunk-cost fallacy
    Explanation
    This scenario is an example of the sunk-cost fallacy. The sunk-cost fallacy occurs when a person continues to pursue a course of action or decision because they have already invested time, money, or effort into it, even if it no longer makes logical sense or is beneficial. In this case, the person is faced with the choice of going to the concert and getting muddy or staying home, but either way, their 100 dollars is wasted. However, if they choose to go to the concert just because they have already invested in the ticket, they are falling victim to the sunk-cost fallacy.

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  • 14. 

    A process of searching for the means or steps to reduce differences between the current situation and the desired goal is what?

    • A.

      Heuristics

    • B.

      Functional fixedness

    • C.

      Analogical problem solving

    • D.

      Means-end analysis

    Correct Answer
    D. Means-end analysis
    Explanation
    Means-end analysis refers to a problem-solving strategy in which a person identifies the differences between their current situation and their desired goal, and then determines the means or steps necessary to reduce those differences. This involves breaking down the problem into smaller sub-goals and working towards them systematically. Heuristics refers to mental shortcuts or rules of thumb used to solve problems, while functional fixedness refers to the tendency to only see objects or concepts in their traditional or expected uses. Analogical problem solving involves using knowledge from one problem to solve a similar problem.

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  • 15. 

    Solving a problem by finding a similar problem with a known solution and using that solution to solve the current problem is an example of what?

    • A.

      Functional fixedness

    • B.

      Means-end analysis

    • C.

      Analogical problem solving

    • D.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    C. Analogical problem solving
    Explanation
    Analogical problem solving refers to the approach of solving a problem by finding a similar problem that has a known solution and using that solution to solve the current problem. This involves identifying the similarities between the two problems and applying the same solution to the current problem. It is a useful problem-solving technique as it allows individuals to leverage their past experiences and knowledge to find solutions to new problems.

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  • 16. 

    If you tack a candle and a matchbox, how can you use these three things to mount the candle on the wall? - This is what type of problem-solving? (hint: you're not using the objects as their normal function)  

    • A.

      Analogical problem solving

    • B.

      Creativity and insight

    • C.

      Functional fixedness

    • D.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    C. Functional fixedness
    Explanation
    Functional fixedness is the correct answer because it refers to the cognitive bias that limits a person's ability to see an object's potential uses beyond its typical or intended function. In this problem, functional fixedness is demonstrated by not considering that the matchbox can be used as a platform or holder for the candle, allowing it to be mounted on the wall. This type of problem-solving requires thinking outside the box and overcoming the tendency to only see objects in their usual roles.

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  • 17. 

    People's judgments about whether to accept conclusions depend more on how believable the conclusions are than whether the arguments are logically valid?

    • A.

      Syllogistic reasoning

    • B.

      Practical reasoning

    • C.

      Theoretical reasoning

    • D.

      Belief bias

    Correct Answer
    D. Belief bias
    Explanation
    Belief bias refers to the tendency for people to rely more on the believability of conclusions rather than the logical validity of arguments when making judgments. This means that individuals are more likely to accept conclusions that align with their pre-existing beliefs, even if the arguments supporting those conclusions are not logically sound. This bias can influence decision-making and lead to the acceptance of inaccurate or flawed conclusions.

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  • 18. 

    Determining whether a conclusion follows from two statements that are assumed to be true. 

    • A.

      Theoretical reasoning

    • B.

      Syllogistic reasoning

    • C.

      Belief bias

    • D.

      Practical reasoning

    Correct Answer
    B. Syllogistic reasoning
    Explanation
    Syllogistic reasoning involves determining whether a conclusion follows from two assumed true statements. It is a form of logical reasoning that uses deductive logic to draw conclusions based on the relationship between the statements. The other options, theoretical reasoning, belief bias, and practical reasoning, do not specifically involve the process of determining whether a conclusion follows from assumed true statements.

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  • 19. 

    Logical reasoning that was NOT influenced by prior beliefs makes what part of the brain active? This is an example of what? 

    • A.

      Parietal lobe, belief neutral

    • B.

      Parietal lobe, belief laden

    • C.

      Left temporal, belief lade

    • D.

      Left temporal, belief neutral

    Correct Answer
    A. Parietal lobe, belief neutral
    Explanation
    When logical reasoning is not influenced by prior beliefs, the parietal lobe becomes active. This is an example of how the parietal lobe is involved in processing information without being biased by pre-existing beliefs or assumptions.

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  • 20. 

    The left temporal area activated during reasoning influenced by prior beliefs is what?

    • A.

      Belief neutral

    • B.

      Belief laden

    • C.

      Belief system

    • D.

      Belief bias

    Correct Answer
    B. Belief laden
    Explanation
    The left temporal area being activated during reasoning influenced by prior beliefs suggests that the reasoning process is influenced by these beliefs. This means that the individual's prior beliefs play a significant role in shaping their reasoning and decision-making. The term "belief laden" captures this idea, indicating that the reasoning process is loaded or influenced by pre-existing beliefs.

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Quiz Review Timeline +

Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Aug 28, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Apr 12, 2010
    Quiz Created by
    Bigdch
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