Pace Quiz Sem 1, Blood Quiz

21 Questions | Total Attempts: 487

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Pace Quiz Sem 1, Blood Quiz

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The leucocyte that contains the major basic protein is the
    • A. 

      Neutrophil

    • B. 

      Eosinophil

    • C. 

      Monocyte

    • D. 

      Lymphocyte

    • E. 

      Basophil

  • 2. 
    Which is the only leukocyte that, after entering the connective tissue from the bloodstream, can re-enter the bloodstream?
    • A. 

      Lymphocyte

    • B. 

      Neutrophil

    • C. 

      Monocyte

    • D. 

      Basophil

    • E. 

      Neutrophil

  • 3. 
    Which of the following substances, produced by platelets, is responsible for the activation of platelets?
    • A. 

      Serotonin

    • B. 

      Phosphatidyl inositol

    • C. 

      Thromboxane

    • D. 

      Prostaglandins

    • E. 

      Leukotrienes

  • 4. 
    Control of the overall level of active thrombin is exerted by :
    • A. 

      Factor VIla

    • B. 

      Factor IXa

    • C. 

      Fibrin

    • D. 

      Antithrombin III

    • E. 

      Factor VIlla

  • 5. 
    Which of the following substances, produced by platelets, is responsible for contraction of smooth muscle cells?
    • A. 

      Serotonin

    • B. 

      Phosphatidyl inositol

    • C. 

      Thromboxane

    • D. 

      Prostaglandins

    • E. 

      Leukotrienes

  • 6. 
    One of the important regulatory roles of thrombin is the binding to protease activatable receptors. These G-protein coupled receptors release interleukins 1 and 6 which result in the secretion of ICAM-l and VCAM-l causing
    • A. 

      Platelet aggregation and leukocyte adhesion

    • B. 

      Secretion of prostaglandins from endothelial cells

    • C. 

      Secretion of thrombin from leukocytes

    • D. 

      Formation of fibrin monomer

    • E. 

      Contact phase activation

  • 7. 
    Patients with vitamin K deficiency are most likely to have prolonged coagulation time because of problems associated with:
    • A. 

      Factor V

    • B. 

      Factor VIII

    • C. 

      Factor II

    • D. 

      High molecular weight kininogen

    • E. 

      Von Willebrand factor

  • 8. 
    A girl had developed repeated attacks of pneumonia almost immediately after birth. A blood test taken 3 weeks after birth showed a blood hemoglobin concentration of 4 .5%(normaI at that age: 15-19%).This couId possibly be a serious case of:
    • A. 

      Sickle cell disease or a-thalassemia but not B-thalassemia

    • B. 

      A-thalassemia but not sickle cell disease or B-thalassemia

    • C. 

      Sickle cell disease or B-thalassemia but not a-thalassemia

    • D. 

      Sickle cell disease but not a-thalassemia or B-thalassemia

    • E. 

      A-thalassemia or B-thalassemia but not sickle cell disease

  • 9. 
    Hemoglobin S can be separated from normal hemoglobin A by electrophoresis on paper or cellulose acetate foil. This is possible because hemoglobin S:
    • A. 

      Is more hydrophllic than hemoglobin A

    • B. 

      Is more hydrophobic than hemoglobin A

    • C. 

      Has a different number of electrical charges than hemoglobin A

    • D. 

      Has a more compact shape than hemoglobin A

    • E. 

      Has a different molecular weight than hemoglobin A

  • 10. 
    After an upper respiratory tract infection, a 10-year-old girl with sickle cell disease suddenly falls very ill. A blood test shows a hemoglobin concentration of 4%. The most likely problem is:
    • A. 

      Lack of erythropoietin

    • B. 

      Excessive formation of fibrin clots caused by excessive sickling

    • C. 

      Acute iron deficiency

    • D. 

      Trapping of erythrocytes in the spleen

    • E. 

      Internal bleeding

  • 11. 
    In your freezer you have blood plasma from one patient with known hemophilia A, and from another patient with hemophilia B. Now you have a new patient, and you don't know what kind of hemophilia he has. So you take his blood and mix it (separately) with the plasma from these two known patients. If your new patient has hemophilia A, his blood will clot when mixed with plasma from
    • A. 

      The hemophilia A patient

    • B. 

      The hemophilia B patient

    • C. 

      Both

    • D. 

      Neither

  • 12. 
    In theory, a female who is heterozygous for hemophilia A should produce only 50% as much factor VIII as a homozygous normal female. Actually, however, measurements of factor VIII concentration are too variable in heterozygous females to be useful for heterozygote detection. This is because of
    • A. 

      Allelic heterogeneity

    • B. 

      Locus heterogeneity

    • C. 

      Epistasis

    • D. 

      Skewed X-inactivation

    • E. 

      Multiple call inearity

  • 13. 
    A patient presents with blood in the urine. You wish to assess whether this patient has a hemoglobinuria or a myoglobinuria. A blood test for one of these proteins should help you to arrive at the correct conclusion.
    • A. 

      Haptoglobin

    • B. 

      Hemopexin

    • C. 

      Transferrin

    • D. 

      Alphal-antitryptsin

    • E. 

      Hemoglobin

  • 14. 
    Plasma measurement of which of the following enzymes will give a good indication of acute pancreatitis?
    • A. 

      Creatine kinase

    • B. 

      Lactate dehydrogenase

    • C. 

      Albumin

    • D. 

      Amylase

    • E. 

      Alpha--macroglobulin

  • 15. 
    Hemoglobin reversibly binds oxygen, protons, 2,3-bis-phosphoglycerate, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. Which statement is CORRECT concerning the nature of these bindings?
    • A. 

      Oxygen binds to Fe+3 but not to Fe+2.

    • B. 

      Hydrophobic interactions are the primary forces associated with BPG bind ing to hemoglobin

    • C. 

      When oxyhemoglobin moves to a more acidic environment, it is more apt to release its oxygen

    • D. 

      Carbon dioxide binds to Fe+2 but not to Fe+3 hemoglobin

    • E. 

      Carbon monoxide binds to Fe+3 but not to Fe+2 hemoglobin.

  • 16. 
    A solution of equal amount of hemoglobin and myoglobin is maintained at a very low partial pressure of oxygen, so that both proteins exist predominantly in the deoxygenated form. What happens when the solution is then bubbled with a small amount of oxygen?
    • A. 

      Myoglobin undergoes a conformational change that raises its oxygen affinity above that of hemoglobin

    • B. 

      2,3BPG dissociates from hemoglobin and binds to myoglobin.

    • C. 

      Much more of the dissolved oxygen binds to myoglobin than to hemoglobin.

    • D. 

      Hemoglobin dissociates into its subunits

    • E. 

      Most of the hemoglobin becomes oxygenated while most of the myoglobin rema ins deoxygenated

  • 17. 
    The hormone binding proteins are important because they
    • A. 

      Prevent the hormones from being excreted in the urine

    • B. 

      Make the hormones soluble in an aqueous phase

    • C. 

      Prevent degradation of the hormones in the vascular system

    • D. 

      Keep the hormones in an inactive state until they are delivered to the target tissue

    • E. 

      Have receptors on all body cells

  • 18. 
    Which of the following enzymes would you expect to find in higher levels in the plasma of children than in adult plasma?
    • A. 

      Gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT)

    • B. 

      Alkaline phosphatase

    • C. 

      Lactate dehydrogenase

    • D. 

      Acid phosphatase

    • E. 

      Alanine transaminase

  • 19. 
    If a patient overdoses on the therapeutic agent streptokinase it will most likely affect which of the following?
    • A. 

      The tenase complex

    • B. 

      Stabilization of factor VIII

    • C. 

      Release of bradykinin from high molecular weight kininogen

    • D. 

      Lipid associated coagulation inhibitor

    • E. 

      Fibrinolysis

  • 20. 
    A family with mother and two children has been blood-typed with the following results: Mother is A-Rh+, the daughter is B-Rh-, and the son is A-Rh+. Is this possible?
    • A. 

      Yes, but only with two different fathers

    • B. 

      No, there has to be an error in the blood type for the daughter

    • C. 

      Yes, the father must have been BO and Rh-/Rh- homozygote

    • D. 

      Yes, the father must have been BO or AB with one allele Rh-

    • E. 

      Yes, the father must have been BO and Rh+

  • 21. 
    • A. 

      Amino acid substitutions in the galactosyl transferase

    • B. 

      Inactivation of the Fucose transferase

    • C. 

      Frameshift mutation in the galactosyl transferase

    • D. 

      Differential ability to produce sugars D-galactose or N-acetylgalactosamine

    • E. 

      Expression of Fucose transferase type 1 versus type 2 leading to use of different substrate structures