NCLEX Quiz: Stress, Anxiety, And Mind-body Disorders

Approved & Edited by ProProfs Editorial Team
The editorial team at ProProfs Quizzes consists of a select group of subject experts, trivia writers, and quiz masters who have authored over 10,000 quizzes taken by more than 100 million users. This team includes our in-house seasoned quiz moderators and subject matter experts. Our editorial experts, spread across the world, are rigorously trained using our comprehensive guidelines to ensure that you receive the highest quality quizzes.
Learn about Our Editorial Process
| By Santepro
S
Santepro
Community Contributor
Quizzes Created: 468 | Total Attempts: 2,441,307
Questions: 10 | Attempts: 4,342

SettingsSettingsSettings
NCLEX Quiz: Stress, Anxiety, And Mind-body Disorders - Quiz

Boost your nursing knowledge with our intensive NCLEX quiz on stress, anxiety, and mind-body disorders. This insightful quiz plunges you into the complex world of psychosomatic health, challenging your understanding of how mental states can impact physical well-being. From diagnosing stress disorders to managing anxiety symptoms and understanding the nuances of psychophysiological conditions, this interactive test offers a comprehensive review of this essential nursing topic. This quiz is not just a learning tool, but a mental journey that highlights the interplay between mind and body, underlining the importance of holistic healthcare. Perfect for NCLEX exam preparation or continual nursing education. Read moreLet's go!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Chuck is a 20-year-old student diagnosed of having obsessive-compulsive behavior. A psychiatrist prescribes clomipramine (Anafranil) to treat his condition. Nurse Nicolette understands the rationale for this treatment is that the clomipramine:

    • A.

      Increases dopamine levels

    • B.

      Increases serotonin levels

    • C.

      Decreases norepinephrine levels

    • D.

      Decreases GABA levels

    Correct Answer
    B. Increases serotonin levels
    Explanation
    Clomipramine (Anafranil) is a tricyclic antidepressant that is commonly used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). It works by increasing the levels of serotonin in the brain. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that plays a role in regulating mood, emotions, and behavior. By increasing serotonin levels, clomipramine helps to reduce the symptoms of OCD, such as intrusive thoughts and repetitive behaviors. This is why the nurse understands that the rationale for prescribing clomipramine to Chuck is to increase serotonin levels.

    Rate this question:

  • 2. 

    A nurse at Nurseslabs Medical Center is developing a care plan for a female client with post-traumatic stress disorder. Which of the following would she do initially?

    • A.

      Instruct the client to use distraction techniques to cope with flashbacks.

    • B.

      Encourage the client to put the past in proper perspective.

    • C.

      Encourage the client to verbalize thoughts and feelings about the trauma.

    • D.

      Avoid discussing the traumatic event with the client.

    Correct Answer
    C. Encourage the client to verbalize thoughts and feelings about the trauma.
    Explanation
    Encouraging the client to verbalize thoughts and feelings about the trauma is the initial step in developing a care plan for a client with post-traumatic stress disorder. This allows the client to express their emotions and experiences related to the trauma, which can help them process and cope with their feelings. Verbalizing thoughts and feelings also promotes a therapeutic relationship between the nurse and the client, fostering trust and support. This approach is consistent with the principles of trauma-focused therapy, which aims to address and heal the psychological effects of trauma.

    Rate this question:

  • 3. 

    A group of community nurses sees and plans care for various clients with different types of problems. Which of the following clients would they consider the most vulnerable to post-traumatic stress disorder?

    • A.

      An eight (8)-year-old boy with asthma who has recently failed a grade in school

    • B.

      A 20-year-old college student with DM who experienced date rape

    • C.

      A 40-year-old widower who has recently lost his wife to cancer

    • D.

      A wife of an individual with a severe substance abuse problem

    Correct Answer
    B. A 20-year-old college student with DM who experienced date rape
    Explanation
    The most vulnerable client to post-traumatic stress disorder would be the 20-year-old college student with DM who experienced date rape. This client has experienced a traumatic event, which is a risk factor for developing PTSD. The combination of the traumatic event and the emotional and physical impact of the rape can contribute to the development of PTSD symptoms. Age, health condition, and recent life events all play a role in determining vulnerability to PTSD, and in this case, the college student meets these criteria.

    Rate this question:

  • 4. 

    Which outcome is most appropriate for Francis, who has a dissociative disorder?

    • A.

      Francis will deal with uncomfortable emotions on a conscious level.

    • B.

      Francis will modify stress with the use of relaxation techniques.

    • C.

      Francis will identify his anxiety responses.

    • D.

      Francis will use problem-solving strategies when feeling stressed.

    Correct Answer
    A. Francis will deal with uncomfortable emotions on a conscious level.
    Explanation
    Francis, who has a dissociative disorder, dealing with uncomfortable emotions on a conscious level is the most appropriate outcome. Dissociative disorders involve a disconnection or lack of integration between different aspects of one's identity, memory, or consciousness. By consciously addressing and acknowledging these uncomfortable emotions, Francis can work towards integrating their experiences and reducing dissociative symptoms. This approach may involve therapy techniques such as grounding exercises, mindfulness, and emotional regulation strategies to help Francis stay present and connected with their emotions.

    Rate this question:

  • 5. 

    The psychiatric nurse uses cognitive-behavioral techniques when working with a client who experiences panic attacks. Which of the following techniques are common to this theoretical framework? Select all that apply.

    • A.

      Administering anti-anxiety medication as prescribed

    • B.

      Encouraging the client to restructure thoughts

    • C.

      Helping the client to use controlled relaxation breathing

    • D.

      Helping the client examine evidence of stressors

    • E.

      Questioning the client about early childhood relationships

    • F.

      Teaching the client about anxiety and panic

    Correct Answer(s)
    B. Encouraging the client to restructure thoughts
    C. Helping the client to use controlled relaxation breathing
    D. Helping the client examine evidence of stressors
    E. Questioning the client about early childhood relationships
    Explanation
    The correct answer choices are all techniques commonly used in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for clients experiencing panic attacks. Encouraging the client to restructure thoughts involves helping them identify and challenge negative or irrational thoughts that contribute to their panic attacks. Helping the client use controlled relaxation breathing teaches them techniques to manage their physical symptoms of anxiety during a panic attack. Helping the client examine evidence of stressors involves exploring the triggers or underlying causes of their panic attacks. Questioning the client about early childhood relationships may be used to identify any potential underlying issues or trauma that may contribute to their panic attacks.

    Rate this question:

  • 6. 

    Marty is pacing and complains of racing thoughts. Nurse Lally asks the client if something upsetting happened. and Marty’s response is vague and not focused on the question. Nurse Lally assess Marty’s level of anxiety as:

    • A.

      Mild

    • B.

      Moderate

    • C.

      Severe

    • D.

      Panic.

    Correct Answer
    C. Severe
    Explanation
    Based on the given information, Marty is pacing, complaining of racing thoughts, and providing a vague and unfocused response when asked about something upsetting happening. These symptoms suggest a high level of anxiety and difficulty in managing or expressing emotions effectively. Therefore, Nurse Lally assesses Marty's level of anxiety as severe.

    Rate this question:

  • 7. 

    Nurse Martha is teaching her students about anxiety medications; she explains that benzodiazepines affect which brain chemical?

    • A.

      Acetylcholine

    • B.

      Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)

    • C.

      Norepinephrine

    • D.

      Serotonin

    Correct Answer
    B. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)
    Explanation
    Benzodiazepines are a class of medications that work by enhancing the effects of GABA in the brain. GABA is an inhibitory neurotransmitter that helps to reduce anxiety and promote relaxation. By increasing the activity of GABA, benzodiazepines can help to calm the brain and reduce symptoms of anxiety. Therefore, the correct answer is Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

    Rate this question:

  • 8. 

    Mandy. a nurse who works at Nurseslabs Rehabilitation Center is assessing a client for recent stressful life events. She recognizes that stressful life events are both:

    • A.

      Desirable and growth-promoting.

    • B.

      Positive and negative.

    • C.

      Undesirable and harmful.

    • D.

      Predictable and controllable.

    Correct Answer
    B. Positive and negative.
    Explanation
    Stressful life events can have both positive and negative effects on individuals. While some events may bring about personal growth and development, others can be challenging and detrimental to one's well-being. It is important for a nurse like Mandy to acknowledge the dual nature of these events and provide appropriate support and guidance to clients who may be experiencing both positive and negative effects of stress.

    Rate this question:

  • 9. 

    During a community visit, volunteer nurses teach stress management to the participants. Which belief will the nurses most likely advocate as a method of coping with stressful life events?

    • A.

      Avoidance of stress is an important goal for living.

    • B.

      Control over one’s response to stress is possible.

    • C.

      Most people have no control over their level of stress.

    • D.

      Significant others are important in providing care and concern.

    Correct Answer
    B. Control over one’s response to stress is possible.
    Explanation
    The nurses are most likely to advocate the belief that control over one's response to stress is possible as a method of coping with stressful life events. This belief suggests that individuals have the ability to manage and regulate their reactions to stressors, empowering them to take control of their emotional and physical responses. By promoting this belief, the nurses are encouraging the participants to develop skills and strategies to effectively cope with stress, rather than avoiding it or feeling helpless.

    Rate this question:

  • 10. 

    Genevieve only attends social events when a family member is also present. She exhibits behavior typical of which anxiety disorder?

    • A.

      Agoraphobia

    • B.

      Generalized anxiety disorder

    • C.

      Obsessive-compulsive disorder

    • D.

      Post-traumatic stress disorder

    Correct Answer
    A. Agoraphobia
    Explanation
    Genevieve's behavior of only attending social events when a family member is present suggests that she may have agoraphobia. Agoraphobia is an anxiety disorder characterized by a fear of situations or places where escape might be difficult or embarrassing, or where help may not be available in case of a panic attack or other distressing symptoms. In this case, Genevieve's need for a family member's presence indicates her fear of being alone in social situations, which aligns with the symptoms of agoraphobia.

    Rate this question:

Back to Top Back to top
Advertisement
×

Wait!
Here's an interesting quiz for you.

We have other quizzes matching your interest.