Da-20 C1 Ops Limits Quiz

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Quizzes Created: 1 | Total Attempts: 64
Questions: 21 | Attempts: 64

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Da-20 C1 Ops Limits Quiz - Quiz

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Vs0 (Stall speed in LDG configuration)

  • 2. 

    Vs1 (Stall speed in CRUISE configuration)

  • 3. 

    VR (Rotate Speed)

    Explanation
    The given answer of 44 is the value for VR (Rotate Speed). It is likely that the question is asking for the value of VR or rotate speed, and the correct answer is 44.

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  • 4. 

    Lift-off Airspeed

  • 5. 

    Forced landing final approach airspeed (flaps LDG)

    Explanation
    The correct answer is 55 because during a forced landing, the final approach airspeed with flaps set to landing position is typically 1.3 times the stall speed at maximum gross weight. The stall speed can vary depending on the aircraft, but in this case, it is assumed to be 42 knots. Therefore, 1.3 times 42 is equal to 55 knots, which is the appropriate airspeed for a forced landing final approach with flaps set to landing position.

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  • 6. 

    Min. engine-out airspeed to sustain windmilling prop

    Explanation
    The minimum engine-out airspeed required to sustain a windmilling propeller is 60. This means that if the engine fails, the aircraft must maintain a speed of at least 60 to keep the propeller spinning and producing some level of thrust. This is important for maintaining control and stability during an engine failure situation.

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  • 7. 

    Forced landing final approach airspeed (flaps T/O)

    Explanation
    The forced landing final approach airspeed with flaps T/O is 60. This means that when performing a forced landing, the pilot should maintain an airspeed of 60 knots while using flaps in the takeoff position. This speed is crucial for a safe landing in emergency situations, as it allows for better control and maneuverability of the aircraft. It is important for pilots to be aware of the appropriate airspeeds for different landing scenarios to ensure a successful outcome.

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  • 8. 

    Forced landing final approach airspeed (flaps CRUISE)

    Explanation
    The forced landing final approach airspeed with flaps set to CRUISE is 64. This means that when performing a forced landing, the recommended airspeed to maintain during the final approach with flaps set to the CRUISE position is 64 knots. This speed allows for better control and maneuverability during the landing, ensuring a safe and smooth touchdown.

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  • 9. 

    Normal landing final approach airspeed

    Explanation
    The normal landing final approach airspeed is 60. This means that when an aircraft is preparing to land, it should maintain a speed of 60 units. This speed is typically determined based on various factors such as the weight of the aircraft, wind conditions, and runway length. By maintaining a consistent airspeed during the final approach, pilots can ensure a safe and controlled landing.

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  • 10. 

    No-Flap landing final approach airspeed

    Explanation
    The correct answer for the question is 65. This suggests that the recommended final approach airspeed for a no-flap landing is 65 knots. This speed is likely determined based on various factors such as aircraft type, weight, and wind conditions. A no-flap landing refers to a landing approach without the use of any flaps, which are typically used to increase lift and reduce landing speed. By maintaining a final approach airspeed of 65 knots, the pilot can ensure a safe and controlled landing without the assistance of flaps.

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  • 11. 

    Vx (flaps T/O) (Best angle of climb)

    Explanation
    The given answer, 60, is the value for "Vx" which stands for the speed at which the aircraft achieves the best angle of climb during takeoff with the flaps set to the takeoff position. This means that at a speed of 60, the aircraft will be able to climb at the steepest angle possible, allowing it to gain altitude quickly.

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  • 12. 

    Vx (flaps CRUISE) (Best angle of climb)

    Explanation
    The given answer of 65 is the best angle of climb speed (Vx) for an aircraft with flaps set to the CRUISE position. Vx is the airspeed at which the aircraft will achieve the greatest altitude gain per unit of horizontal distance traveled. This speed allows the aircraft to climb at the steepest angle possible, which is useful when trying to clear obstacles during takeoff or climb. The flaps set to the CRUISE position indicate that the aircraft is in a configuration optimized for cruising flight.

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  • 13. 

    VY (flaps T/O) (Best rate of climb)

  • 14. 

    VY (flaps CRUISE) (Best rate of climb)

    Explanation
    The given answer "70" is likely referring to the airspeed in knots. In aviation, the term "flaps CRUISE" indicates that the flaps on the aircraft are set to the cruise position. "Best rate of climb" refers to the airspeed at which the aircraft can achieve the highest rate of climb. Therefore, the answer "70" suggests that the aircraft should maintain an airspeed of 70 knots when the flaps are set to the cruise position in order to achieve the best rate of climb.

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  • 15. 

    Best glide airspeed (1764 lbs) (L/D max)

    Explanation
    The best glide airspeed at a weight of 1764 lbs is 73. This means that when the aircraft is at this weight, flying at an airspeed of 73 knots will give it the maximum lift-to-drag ratio. This is important because it allows the aircraft to cover the maximum horizontal distance while descending in case of an engine failure or other emergency situation. Flying at this airspeed will provide the most efficient glide performance for the given weight.

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  • 16. 

    VFE (flaps LDG) (Max airspeed with flaps extended)

    Explanation
    The given answer, 78, represents the maximum airspeed at which the flaps can be extended during landing. Flaps are aerodynamic surfaces on the wings that can be extended to increase lift and decrease the stalling speed of an aircraft. However, they also create drag, so there is a maximum airspeed at which they can safely be extended. In this case, the maximum airspeed is 78, meaning that the flaps should not be extended if the aircraft is flying faster than this speed during landing.

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  • 17. 

    VFE (flaps T/O) (Max airspeed with flaps extended)

    Explanation
    The given answer 100 indicates that the maximum airspeed at which the flaps can be extended for takeoff is 100. This means that the aircraft should not exceed this speed when the flaps are extended, as it may compromise the safety and performance of the aircraft during takeoff.

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  • 18. 

    VA (1764 lbs) (No full or abrupt control inputs above VA or overstress conditions will occur)

  • 19. 

    VNO (Max structural cruising speed)

    Explanation
    The given answer, 118, is the maximum structural cruising speed for VNO. This means that the aircraft should not exceed this speed in normal operations to ensure the structural integrity of the aircraft. Going beyond this speed may put excessive stress on the aircraft's structure, potentially leading to damage or failure. Therefore, it is important for pilots to adhere to this maximum speed limit to ensure safe and efficient flight.

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  • 20. 

    Force propeller to windmill if stopped and starter is inop

    Explanation
    This answer suggests that if the propeller of a windmill is stopped and the starter is not working, the force can be applied to make the propeller start spinning again. The given number "137" does not provide any additional information or context to understand the explanation further.

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  • 21. 

    VNE (Never exceed airspeed)

    Explanation
    VNE, also known as Never Exceed Airspeed, is the maximum speed at which an aircraft should never exceed in order to prevent structural damage or failure. In this case, the correct answer is 164, indicating that the VNE for the aircraft in question is 164 units of airspeed. It is important for pilots to adhere to this limit to ensure the safety and integrity of the aircraft during flight.

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