If You Pass This Quiz, You Are An Excellent Pediatrician

234 Questions | Total Attempts: 58

SettingsSettingsSettings
Please wait...
If You Pass This Quiz, You Are An Excellent Pediatrician

A pediatrician is a medical doctor who sees to the needs of infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. For many young people, a pediatrician is the primary care provider from birth, perhaps through the age of 18. The word pediatrician comes from the Greek word for child. If You Pass This Quiz, You Are An Excellent Pediatrician


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Two weeks after a viral syndrome, a 9-year-old girl presents to your clinic with a complaint of several days of drooping of her mouth. In addition to the drooping of the left side of her mouth, you note that she is unable to completely shut her left eye. Her smile is asymmetric, but her examination is otherwise normal. This girl likely has:
    • A. 

      Guillain-Barré syndrome

    • B. 

      Botulism

    • C. 

      Cerebral vascular accident 

    • D. 

      Brainstem tumor

    • E. 

      Bell palsy

  • 2. 
    An infant can move his head from side to side while following a moving object, can lift his head from a prone position 45° off the examining table, smiles when encouraged, and makes cooing sounds. He cannot maintain a seated position. The most likely age of the infant is:
    • A. 

      1 month

    • B. 

      3 months

    • C. 

      6 months

    • D. 

      9 months

    • E. 

      12 months

  • 3. 
    A child is brought to your clinic for a routine examine. She can dress with help, can ride a tricycle, knows her own age, and can speak in short sentences. She had difficulty in copying a square. The age of this child is most likely:
    • A. 

      1 year

    • B. 

      2 years

    • C. 

      3 years

    • D. 

      4 years

    • E. 

      5 years

  • 4. 
    A 4-year-old girl is noticed by her grandmother to have a limp and a somewhat swollen left knee. The parents report that the patient occasionally complains of pain in that knee. An ophthalmologic examination reveals findings as depicted in the photograph. The condition most likely to be associated with these findings is:
    • A. 

      Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    • B. 

      Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    • C. 

      Henoch-Schönlein purpura

    • D. 

      Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease

    • E. 

      Osgood-Schlatter disease

  • 5. 
    The previously healthy 4-year-old child pictured presents to the emergency room with a 2-day history of a brightly erythematous rash and temperature of 40°C (104°F). The exquisitely tender, generalized rash is worse in the flexural and perioral areas. The child is admitted and over the next day develops crusting and fissuring around the eyes, mouth, and nose. The desquamation of skin shown occurs with gentle traction. This child most likely has:
    • A. 

      Epidermolysis bullosa

    • B. 

      Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome

    • C. 

      Erythema multiforme

    • D. 

      Drug eruption

    • E. 

      Scarlet fever

  • 6. 
    You are counseling an adolescent patient about the long-term management of her asthma while she is away at college. She brought an article she found on the Internet that promotes an herbal supplement purported to be a “safe, natural” treatment for asthma. You recall a recent study in the medical literature showing inhaled steroids to be statistically superior to the advertised herbal supplement at preventing asthma exacerbations at the p <0.05 level. You explain to her that this means that:
    • A. 

      The inhaled steroids are 5% better than herbal treatment

    • B. 

      A critical threshold for medical significance has been reached

    • C. 

      Patients will not benefit from the herbal treatment 5% of the time

    • D. 

      The odds are less than 1 in 20 that the differences observed were only a chance variation

    • E. 

      It would be unethical to use herbal treatment

  • 7. 
    A previously healthy 8-year-old boy has a 3-week history of low-grade fever of unknown source, fatigue, weight loss, myalgia, and headaches. On repeated examinations during this time, he is found to have developed a heart murmur, petechiae, and mild splenomegaly. The most likely diagnosis is:
    • A. 

      Rheumatic fever

    • B. 

      Kawasaki disease 

    • C. 

      Scarlet fever 

    • D. 

      Endocarditis 

    • E. 

      Tuberculosis

  • 8. 
    After you make the diagnosis in the previous case, you explain the findings to the family and instruct the family to:
    • A. 

      Restrict the child from all strenuous activities

    • B. 

      Give the child a no-salt-added diet

    • C. 

      Ensure that the patient receives antibiotic prophylaxis for dental procedures

    • D. 

      Test all family members in the home

    • E. 

      Avoid allowing the child to get upset

  • 9. 
    A 5-year-old boy who was previously healthy has a 1-day history of low-grade fever, colicky abdominal pain, and a skin rash. He is alert but irritable; temperature is 38.6°C (101.5°F). A diffuse, erythematous, maculopapular, and petechial rash is present on his buttocks and lower extremities, as shown in the following figure. There is no localized abdominal tenderness or rebound; bowel sounds are active. Laboratory data demonstrate: Urinalysis: 30 red blood cells per high-powered field, 2+ protein Stool: guaiac positive Platelet count: 135,000/μL These findings are most consistent with:
    • A. 

      Anaphylactoid purpura

    • B. 

      Meningococcemia

    • C. 

      Child abuse 

    • D. 

      Leukemia 

    • E. 

      Hemophilia B

  • 10. 
    A 4-month-old baby boy has just arrived in the emergency room. He is cold and stiff. History from the parents is that the seemingly healthy infant had been placed in his crib for the night, and when they next saw him, in the morning, he was dead. Physical examination is uninformative. Routine whole-body x-rays are shown. The most likely diagnosis is:
    • A. 

      Scurvy

    • B. 

      Congenital syphilis

    • C. 

      Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)

    • D. 

      Osteogenesis imperfecta

    • E. 

      Battery

  • 11. 
    A mother brings an 18-month-old to the emergency center with the concern that the child may have ingested a substance. Which of the following is a contraindication to the use of ipecac in this child:
    • A. 

      Age less than 5 years

    • B. 

      Breast-feeding

    • C. 

      Ingestion of alkali

    • D. 

      Ingestion of iron

    • E. 

      Concurrent administration of intravenous glucose

  • 12. 
    A mother calls you on the telephone and says that her 4-year-old son bit the hand of her 2-year-old son 2 days previously. The area around the laceration has become red, indurated, and swollen, and he has a temperature of 39.4°C (103°F). Your response should be to:
    • A. 

      Arrange for a plastic surgery consultation to be scheduled in 3 days

    • B. 

      Admit the child to the hospital immediately for surgical debridement and antibiotic treatment

    • C. 

      Prescribe penicillin over the telephone and have the mother apply warm soaks for 15 min qid

    • D. 

      Suggest purchase of bacitracin ointment to apply to the lesion tid

    • E. 

      See the patient in the emergency room to suture the laceration

  • 13. 
    The adolescent shown presents with a 14-day history of multiple oval lesions over her back. The rash began with a single lesion over the lower abdomen (A); the other lesions developed over the next days (B). These lesions are slightly pruritic. The likely diagnosis is:
    • A. 

      Contact dermatitis

    • B. 

      Pityriasis rosea 

    • C. 

      Seborrheic dermatitis 

    • D. 

      Lichen planus

    • E. 

      Psoriasis

  • 14. 
    The most appropriate initial therapy for the patient in the previous question is:
    • A. 

      Phototherapy

    • B. 

      High-dose topical steroid therapy

    • C. 

      Systemic antifungal agents

    • D. 

      Coal-tar shampoos

    • E. 

      Observation and topical emollients

  • 15. 
    A very concerned mother brings a 2-year-old child to your office because of multiple episodes of a brief, shrill cry followed by a prolonged expiration and apnea. You have been following this child in your practice since birth and know that the child is a product of a normal pregnancy and delivery, has been growing and developing normally, and has no acute medical problems. The mother relates that the first episode in question occurred immediately after the mother refused to give the child some juice. The child became cyanotic and unconscious and had generalized clonic jerks. A few moments later the child awakened and had no residual effects. A second episode of identical nature occurred at the grocery store when the father of the child refused to purchase a toy for the child. Your physical examination reveals a totally delightful and normal child. The most likely diagnosis in this case is:
    • A. 

      Seizure disorder 

    • B. 

      Drug ingestion

    • C. 

      Hyperactivity with attention deficit 

    • D. 

      Pervasive development disorder 

    • E. 

      Breath-holding spell

  • 16. 
    The most appropriate course of action in the previous case would be to:
    • A. 

      Obtain an EEG and neurologic consultation prior to starting anticonvulsants

    • B. 

      Begin anticonvulsants while awaiting the results of an EEG, a neurologic consultation, and a urine drug screen

    • C. 

      Initiate a trial of methylphenidate (Ritalin)

    • D. 

      Instruct the family to splash cold water on the child’s face and begin mouth-to-mouth resuscitation should another episode occur

    • E. 

      Reassure the family of the likely benign nature of the problem and offer counseling for appropriate behavior modification

  • 17. 
    The 3-day-old infant pictured has a facial rash. The most likely diagnosis is:
    • A. 

      Herpes

    • B. 

      Neonatal acne 

    • C. 

      Milia

    • D. 

      Seborrheic dermatitis 

    • E. 

      Eczema

  • 18. 
    You are called to the emergency room to see one of your patients. The father of this 3-year-old was spraying the yard with an unknown insecticide. In the emergency room, the child is noted to have bradycardia, muscle fasciculations, meiosis, wheezing, and profound drooling. The most likely agent included in this pesticide is:
    • A. 

      Organophosphate

    • B. 

      Chlorophenothane (DDT)

    • C. 

      Sodium cyanide

    • D. 

      Warfarin

    • E. 

      Paraquat

  • 19. 
    A 2-year-old child (A) presents with a four-day history of a rash limited to the feet and ankles. The papular rash is both pruritic and erythematous. The 3-month-old sibling of this patient (B) has similar lesions also involving the head and neck. Appropriate treatment for this condition includes:
    • A. 

      Coal-tar soap

    • B. 

      Permethrin

    • C. 

      Hydrocortisone cream

    • D. 

      Emollients

    • E. 

      Topical antifungal cream

  • 20. 
    An 8-hour-old infant develops increased respiratory distress, hypothermia, and hypotension. A CBC demonstrates a WBC of 2500/μL with 80% bands. Which of the following diagnoses is most likely?
    • A. 

      Gonococcal eye infection

    • B. 

      Diaphragmatic hernia

    • C. 

      Group B streptococcal pneumonia

    • D. 

      Transient tachypnea of the newborn

    • E. 

      Chlamydial pneumonia

  • 21. 
    A 16-year-old basketball player complains of pain in his knees. A physical examination reveals, in addition to tenderness, a swollen and prominent tibial tuberosity. Radiographs of the area are unremarkable. The most likely diagnosis is:
    • A. 

      Osgood-Schlatter disease

    • B. 

      Popliteal cyst

    • C. 

      Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    • D. 

      Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease

    • E. 

      Gonococcal arthritis

  • 22. 
    You are performing a well-child examination on a new patient, the 1-year-old child shown in the picture. Your next action should be to:
    • A. 

      Patch the eye with the greater refractive error

    • B. 

      Patch the eye that deviates

    • C. 

      Defer patching or ophthalmologic exam until the child is older and better able to cooperate

    • D. 

      Reassure the mother that he will outgrow it

    • E. 

      Refer immediately to ophthalmology, as central vision may fail to develop if the diagnosis and treatment are delayed

  • 23. 
    You are seeing a 2-month-old infant, brought by her father for a well-child examination. He has concerns about maintaining a safe environment for his child. In providing age-appropriate anticipatory guidance, you tell him that:
    • A. 

      He should set his water heater to 71°C (160°F) to ensure the sterility of dishes and clothes, thereby decreasing the risk of infections

    • B. 

      His 2-month-old should not be given solid food at this time

    • C. 

      Pillows in the crib should be soft to provide a comfortable sleeping environment

    • D. 

      Infants should be placed on their stomachs to sleep, as this decreases the risk of choking if they spit up

    • E. 

      An infant should never be left unattended in the bathtub until she learns to sit on her own, and then only for brief periods of time

  • 24. 
    An infant who sits with only minimal support, attempts to attain a toy beyond reach, and rolls over from the supine to the prone position, but does not have a pincer grasp, is at a developmental level of:
    • A. 

      2 months

    • B. 

      4 months

    • C. 

      6 months

    • D. 

      9 months

    • E. 

      1 year

  • 25. 
    A 5-year-old boy presents with the severe rash pictured as follows. The rash is pruritic, and it is especially intense in the flexural areas. The mother reports that the symptoms began in infancy (when it also involved the face) and that her 6-month-old child has similar symptoms. The most likely diagnosis of this condition is:
    • A. 

      Seborrheic dermatitis

    • B. 

      Superficial candidiasis

    • C. 

      Psoriasis

    • D. 

      Eczema

    • E. 

      Contact dermatitis

Back to Top Back to top