Peripheral Nervous System And Synaptic Pharmacology 1: Organisation Of The Pns

Approved & Edited by ProProfs Editorial Team
At ProProfs Quizzes, our dedicated in-house team of experts takes pride in their work. With a sharp eye for detail, they meticulously review each quiz. This ensures that every quiz, taken by over 100 million users, meets our standards of accuracy, clarity, and engagement.
Learn about Our Editorial Process
| Written by ILovePharmacy
I
ILovePharmacy
Community Contributor
Quizzes Created: 6 | Total Attempts: 1,140
Questions: 16 | Attempts: 61

SettingsSettingsSettings
Peripheral Nervous System And Synaptic Pharmacology 1: Organisation Of The Pns - Quiz


Lecture 1


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    The input zone of a neuron...

    • A. 

      Is the part where incoming signals from other neurons are received

    • B. 

      Is the part that conducts an action potential in an undiminishing fashion, often over long distances

    • C. 

      Is the part where action potentials are initiated

    • D. 

      Is the part that releases the neurotransmitter which influences other cells

    Correct Answer
    A. Is the part where incoming signals from other neurons are received
    Explanation
    The input zone of a neuron is the part where incoming signals from other neurons are received. This is where the neuron integrates and processes the information it receives from other neurons. These incoming signals can be excitatory or inhibitory, and they determine whether the neuron will generate an action potential or not. The input zone plays a crucial role in the overall functioning of the neuron as it receives and integrates signals from multiple sources before deciding whether to transmit the information further or not.

    Rate this question:

  • 2. 

    The trigger zone of a neuron...

    • A. 

      Is the part where incoming signals from other neurons are received

    • B. 

      Is the part that conducts an action potential in an undiminishing fashion, often over long distances

    • C. 

      Is the part where action potentials are initiated

    • D. 

      Is the part that releases the neurotransmitter which influences other cells

    Correct Answer
    C. Is the part where action potentials are initiated
    Explanation
    The trigger zone of a neuron is the part where action potentials are initiated. This is where the incoming signals from other neurons are integrated and if the combined signal reaches a certain threshold, an action potential is generated. The trigger zone plays a crucial role in the transmission of signals within the neuron, as it determines whether or not an action potential will be produced and propagated along the axon.

    Rate this question:

  • 3. 

    The conducting zone of a neuron...

    • A. 

      Is the part where incoming signals from other neurons are received

    • B. 

      Is the part that transmits an action potential in an undiminishing fashion, often over long distances

    • C. 

      Is the part where action potentials are initiated

    • D. 

      Is the part that releases the neurotransmitter which influences other cells

    Correct Answer
    B. Is the part that transmits an action potential in an undiminishing fashion, often over long distances
    Explanation
    The conducting zone of a neuron refers to the part that transmits an action potential in an undiminishing fashion, often over long distances. This means that it is responsible for carrying electrical signals from one end of the neuron to the other without any loss of strength or intensity. This is crucial for the efficient transmission of information throughout the nervous system.

    Rate this question:

  • 4. 

    The output zone of a neuron...

    • A. 

      Is the part where incoming signals from other neurons are received

    • B. 

      Is the part that conducts an action potential in an undiminishing fashion, often over long distances

    • C. 

      Is the part where action potentials are initiated

    • D. 

      Is the part that releases the neurotransmitter which influences other cells

    Correct Answer
    D. Is the part that releases the neurotransmitter which influences other cells
    Explanation
    The output zone of a neuron is the part that releases the neurotransmitter which influences other cells. This is where the neuron sends signals to other neurons or cells in order to transmit information. The release of neurotransmitters allows for communication between neurons and is essential for the functioning of the nervous system.

    Rate this question:

  • 5. 

    The three classes of neurons are...

    • A. 

      Peripheral, Central and Efferent

    • B. 

      Central, Efferent and Motor

    • C. 

      Afferent, Efferent and Interneuron

    • D. 

      Afferent, Central and Interneuron

    Correct Answer
    C. Afferent, Efferent and Interneuron
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Afferent, Efferent, and Interneuron. Afferent neurons carry sensory information from the body to the central nervous system, while efferent neurons transmit motor signals from the central nervous system to the muscles and glands. Interneurons are responsible for transmitting signals between neurons within the central nervous system. This classification represents the three main types of neurons that work together to transmit and process information throughout the body.

    Rate this question:

  • 6. 

    Which two of the following is a known role of sensory neurons?

    • A. 

      Account for 99% of all neurons

    • B. 

      Transmit information to the CNS

    • C. 

      Are highly specialised

    • D. 

      Transmit information from the CNS to effector organs

    • E. 

      Have sensory receptors at their peripheral end

    Correct Answer(s)
    B. Transmit information to the CNS
    E. Have sensory receptors at their peripheral end
    Explanation
    Sensory neurons are responsible for transmitting information from sensory receptors, which are located at their peripheral end, to the central nervous system (CNS). This allows the brain and spinal cord to receive and process sensory information from the external environment or internal body conditions. Sensory neurons are highly specialized cells that play a crucial role in detecting and relaying sensory stimuli such as touch, temperature, pain, and sound. They account for 99% of all neurons in the body, highlighting their significance in sensory processing and perception.

    Rate this question:

  • 7. 

    What is the role of motor neurons?

    • A. 

      Transmits information from the CNS to effector organs or other neurons

    • B. 

      Transmit information exclusively from neuron to neuron

    • C. 

      Transmit information between effector organs

    • D. 

      Trasmit information to the CNS

    Correct Answer
    A. Transmits information from the CNS to effector organs or other neurons
    Explanation
    Motor neurons are responsible for transmitting information from the central nervous system (CNS) to effector organs or other neurons. Effector organs are responsible for carrying out responses to stimuli, such as muscles contracting or glands secreting hormones. Therefore, motor neurons play a crucial role in coordinating and controlling voluntary and involuntary movements, as well as regulating bodily functions. They serve as the communication pathway between the CNS and the rest of the body, allowing for the execution of motor commands.

    Rate this question:

  • 8. 

    Which of the following statements is false?

    • A. 

      Interneurons transmit information from neuron to neuron

    • B. 

      Interneurons are found exclusively in the CNS

    • C. 

      Interneurons account for approximately 1% of all neurons

    • D. 

      Interneurons can be inhibitory or excitatory

    • E. 

      Interneurons can be highly specialised

    Correct Answer
    C. Interneurons account for approximately 1% of all neurons
    Explanation
    Interneurons are actually found throughout the nervous system, not exclusively in the CNS. They are responsible for transmitting information between sensory and motor neurons, and can be inhibitory or excitatory. Additionally, interneurons can be highly specialized, performing specific functions in neural circuits. Therefore, the statement that interneurons account for approximately 1% of all neurons is false.

    Rate this question:

  • 9. 

    Which is the correct flow of sensory information?

    • A. 

      Receptor -> Efferent Neuron -> Interneuron (CNS) -> Afferent Neuron -> Effector Organ

    • B. 

      Effector Organ -> Efferent Neuron -> Interneuron (CNS) -> Afferent Neuron -> Receptor

    • C. 

      Afferent Neuron -> Interneuron (CNS) -> Effector Organs -> Efferent Neuron -> Receptor

    • D. 

      Receptor -> Afferent Neuron -> Interneuron (CNS) -> Efferent Neuron -> Effector Organ

    Correct Answer
    D. Receptor -> Afferent Neuron -> Interneuron (CNS) -> Efferent Neuron -> Effector Organ
    Explanation
    The correct flow of sensory information starts with the receptor, which detects the sensory stimulus. The receptor then sends the information to the afferent neuron, which carries the sensory information towards the central nervous system (CNS). In the CNS, the sensory information is processed by the interneuron. The processed information is then sent to the efferent neuron, which carries the motor response from the CNS to the effector organ, where the response is executed.

    Rate this question:

  • 10. 

    Which of the following statements if false?

    • A. 

      The PNS contains neuronal and sensory cells

    • B. 

      The PNS includes the spinal cord

    • C. 

      The PNS acts as the interface between the CNS and the environment

    • D. 

      The PNS consists of 43 pairs of nerves; 12 pairs of cranial nerves and 31 pairs of spinal nerves

    Correct Answer
    B. The PNS includes the spinal cord
    Explanation
    The PNS does not include the spinal cord. The spinal cord is part of the CNS (central nervous system), not the PNS (peripheral nervous system). The PNS consists of neuronal and sensory cells and acts as the interface between the CNS and the environment. It includes 43 pairs of nerves, which are divided into 12 pairs of cranial nerves and 31 pairs of spinal nerves.

    Rate this question:

  • 11. 

    The Vegus Nerve...

    • A. 

      Goes through the sympathetic nervous system to the thoracic organs and gut

    • B. 

      Goes through the peripheral nervous system to the thoracic organs and gut

    • C. 

      Goes through the sympathetic nervous system to the lumbar organs and lungs

    • D. 

      Goes though the peripheral nervous system to the lumbar organs and lungs

    Correct Answer
    B. Goes through the peripheral nervous system to the thoracic organs and gut
    Explanation
    The correct answer is that the Vegus Nerve goes through the peripheral nervous system to the thoracic organs and gut. The Vegus Nerve, also known as the Vagus Nerve, is the longest cranial nerve and is responsible for regulating various bodily functions such as heart rate, digestion, and respiratory functions. It innervates the thoracic organs, which include the heart and lungs, as well as the gut or gastrointestinal tract. The peripheral nervous system is the part of the nervous system that connects the central nervous system to the rest of the body, including the organs. Therefore, the Vegus Nerve travels through the peripheral nervous system to reach the thoracic organs and gut.

    Rate this question:

  • 12. 

    The 8 cervical nerves go to...

    • A. 

      Genitals

    • B. 

      Chest and abdominal wall

    • C. 

      Neck, shoulder, arm and hand

    • D. 

      Hips and legs

    • E. 

      Lower GIT

    Correct Answer
    C. Neck, shoulder, arm and hand
    Explanation
    The 8 cervical nerves are responsible for innervating the neck, shoulder, arm, and hand. These nerves emerge from the cervical region of the spinal cord and branch out to provide motor control and sensory information to these areas. This allows for movement, sensation, and coordination in the upper limbs.

    Rate this question:

  • 13. 

    The 12 thoracic nerves go to...

    • A. 

      Genitals

    • B. 

      Chest and abdominal wall

    • C. 

      Neck, shoulder, arm and hand

    • D. 

      Hips and legs

    • E. 

      Lower GIT

    Correct Answer
    B. Chest and abdominal wall
    Explanation
    The 12 thoracic nerves go to the chest and abdominal wall. These nerves originate from the thoracic region of the spinal cord and branch out to innervate the muscles, skin, and organs in the chest and abdominal area. They play a crucial role in providing sensory and motor function to these regions, allowing for movement, sensation, and control of the muscles and organs in the chest and abdomen.

    Rate this question:

  • 14. 

    The 5 lumbar nerves go to...

    • A. 

      Genitals

    • B. 

      Chest and abdominal wall

    • C. 

      Neck, shoulder, arm and hand

    • D. 

      Hips and legs

    • E. 

      Lower GIT

    Correct Answer
    D. Hips and legs
    Explanation
    The 5 lumbar nerves go to the hips and legs. The lumbar nerves are part of the spinal nerves that originate from the lumbar region of the spine. These nerves branch out and innervate various muscles, skin, and organs in the lower body. The nerves in the lumbar region specifically supply motor and sensory information to the hips and legs, allowing for movement, sensation, and control in this area of the body.

    Rate this question:

  • 15. 

    The coccygeal nerve goes to...

    • A. 

      Genitals and lower GIT

    • B. 

      Chest and abdominal wall

    • C. 

      Neck, shoulder, arm and hand

    • D. 

      Hips and legs

    Correct Answer
    A. Genitals and lower GIT
    Explanation
    The coccygeal nerve is responsible for innervating the genitals and lower gastrointestinal tract. This nerve provides sensory and motor functions to these areas, allowing for the perception of touch, pain, and temperature, as well as controlling the movement and function of the muscles in the lower gastrointestinal tract.

    Rate this question:

  • 16. 

    The 5 sacral nerves go to...

    • A. 

      Genitals and lower GIT

    • B. 

      Chest and abdominal wall

    • C. 

      Neck, shoulder, arm and hand

    • D. 

      Hips and legs

    Correct Answer
    A. Genitals and lower GIT
    Explanation
    The 5 sacral nerves are responsible for innervating the genitals and lower gastrointestinal tract. These nerves provide sensory and motor functions to these areas, allowing for the transmission of signals and control of movements.

    Rate this question:

Back to Top Back to top
×

Wait!
Here's an interesting quiz for you.

We have other quizzes matching your interest.