How Complete Is Your Feedback Loop?

15 Questions | Total Attempts: 113

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Management Quizzes & Trivia

What if your organization was as feedback-driven as Yelp or Amazon? Take this quiz to learn how to master the art of closing the feedback loop.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The service-provider's decision-makers (government, non-profit organization, or other: 
    • A. 

      ask for more information about constituent feedback

    • B. 

      Reference feedback in strategy meetings

    • C. 

      Account for feedback collection methods in budgeting

    • D. 

      Informally talk with constituents

    • E. 

      Make a plan to discuss the results of the feedback

    • F. 

      Create discussion groups with constituent communities

  • 2. 
    The constituents:
    • A. 

      Have strong opinions about service provision in their communities

    • B. 

      Talk amongst their friends and families about quality of local services

    • C. 

      Actively look for avenues to share their thoughts with service organizations

    • D. 

      Give feedback to service organizations

    • E. 

      Informally talk with service organizations

    • F. 

      Regularly work with service organization to improve local services

  • 3. 
    We use feedback results as the basis to hold further discussions with constituents. 
    • A. 

      Never

    • B. 

      Sometimes

    • C. 

      Always

  • 4. 
    When designing the feedback process, 
    • A. 

      We test the process locally and iterate upon it before fully launching

    • B. 

      We make a note of biases so that they can be accounted for during analysis

    • C. 

      We allow respondents to remain anonymous, if they would like

    • D. 

      Questions are written in a way that is respectful of constituents, for purposes that they understand and endorse

    • E. 

      Decision-makers know how they can use the answers for every question asked

  • 5. 
    We have created at least one method for gathering constituent opinion.
    • A. 

      No

    • B. 

      Yes

  • 6. 
    The method (i.e. survey, focus-group discussion, stakeholder working group)
    • A. 

      Is implemented by a suitable party, be it a trained community member or third party

    • B. 

      Begins by explaining the purpose and purpose of the method to constituents

    • C. 

      Asks constituents clear, targeted questions (i.e. What prompted you to stop using our service?)

    • D. 

      Asks constituents to evaluate the services they experience based on multiple factors (service importance, service quality, relationships, and outcomes)

    • E. 

      Includes a question about how constituents really feels about the service organization (i.e. in business, many use the Net Promoter Question: e.g. "How likely are you to recommend ABC Services to a friend or colleague?")

  • 7. 
    We separate the analysis of our data based on respondents'
    • A. 

      Different demographic variables (i.e. age, gender) to understand what different groups think about the same issue (disaggregation)

    • B. 

      Different levels of satisfaction (segmentation)

  • 8. 
    We compare our responses (This is rare! The field is just getting going. Click here to find resources to help you benchmark.)
    • A. 

      With past responses to assess change over time (benchmarking)

    • B. 

      With those of our peers in the sector (benchmarking)

    • C. 

      With other sources of data, including narrative feedback (i.e. interviews, focus groups) and outcome data (i.e. employment rate, infrastructure improvement) (triangulation)

  • 9. 
    We summarize the responses in clear conclusions and simple visual representations that maximize understanding. 
    • A. 

      Never

    • B. 

      Sometimes

    • C. 

      Always

  • 10. 
    When sharing our findings we publish the feedback on an easily accessible public platform. 
    • A. 

      After Some Delay

    • B. 

      Quickly

    • C. 

      In Real Time

  • 11. 
    When learning more about our results, 
    • A. 

      We hold open conversations with constituents about our findings

    • B. 

      We talk with respondents to understand the motivations, causes, and reasons for the responses

  • 12. 
    When discussing the results of the feedback,
    • A. 

      We engage all key decision makers and ask them to think about what the feedback is saying and how they would respond

    • B. 

      We talk with a representative sample of constituents to help us understand how accurately the responses reflect local opinion

    • C. 

      We encourage decision-makers and constituents to co-create actionable recommendations and timelines

    • D. 

      If there are disagreements, we have decision-makers and constituents explain to each other why certain changes are not feasible

  • 13. 
    The service-providing organization has experience in making small, iterative steps and testing them before making larger changes. 
    • A. 

      Never

    • B. 

      Sometimes

    • C. 

      Always

  • 14. 
    When we talk with decision-makers (i.e. those who can change services)
    • A. 

      We present and propose specific changes

    • B. 

      We agree on practical ways of improving the service or relationship

    • C. 

      We see timely responses to our recommendations

  • 15. 
    We monitor whether the feedback has led to action and improvement by
    • A. 

      Following up with the decision-makers on their progress

    • B. 

      Checking to see that this progress is reported back to the constituents

    • C. 

      Monitoring responses to see if the constituents agree that the issue has been addressed

    • D. 

      Asking constituents whether the corrected response is sufficiently working

    • E. 

      Supporting decision-makers in institutionalizing the feedback loop