Take This Easy Trivia Quiz On Project Management!

24 Questions | Total Attempts: 1014

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Take This Easy Trivia Quiz On Project Management!

Take this easy trivia quiz on project management if you want to gauge your understanding when it comes to everything surrounding this discipline in business. A project manager is above all expected to have leadership skills and know-how to communicate with his team effectively. If you fail to get the highest score at least, you would have learned something new at the end.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Involves the processes required to ensure timely completion of a project
    • A. 

      Milestone

    • B. 

      Project Time Management

    • C. 

      Activity List

  • 2. 
    Identifying the specific activities that the project team members and stakeholders must perform to produce the project deliverables 
    • A. 

      Controlling the Schedule

    • B. 

      Defining Activities

    • C. 

      Sequencing Activities

  • 3. 
    Identifying and documenting the relationships between project activities 
    • A. 

      Sequencing Activities

    • B. 

      Developing the Schedule

    • C. 

      Controlling the Schedule

  • 4. 
    Involves estimating how many resources a project team should use to perform project activities 
    • A. 

      Sequencing Activities

    • B. 

      Controlling the Schedule

    • C. 

      Estimating Activity Resources

  • 5. 
    Involves estimating the number of work periods that are needed to complete individual activities 
    • A. 

      Estimating Activity Durations

    • B. 

      Estimating Activity Resources

    • C. 

      Defining Activities

  • 6. 
    Analyzing activity sequences, activity resource estimates, and activity duration estimates to create the project schedule 
    • A. 

      Developing the Schedule

    • B. 

      Controlling the Schedule

    • C. 

      Defining Activities

  • 7. 
    Controlling and managing changes to the project schedule
    • A. 

      Sequencing Activities

    • B. 

      Controlling the Schedule

    • C. 

      Developing the Schedule

  • 8. 
    A tabulation of activities to be included on a project schedule
    • A. 

      Activity List

    • B. 

      Milestone

    • C. 

      Dependency or Relationship

  • 9. 
    Provides more schedule-related information about each activity, such as predecessors, successors, logical relationships, leads and lags, resource requirements, constraints, imposed dates, and assumptions related to the activity 
    • A. 

      Project Time Management

    • B. 

      Sequencing Activities

    • C. 

      Activity Attributes

  • 10. 
    A significant event that has no duration
    • A. 

      Dependency or Relationship

    • B. 

      Activity Attributes

    • C. 

      Milestone

  • 11. 
    Relates to the sequencing of project activities or tasks
    • A. 

      Dependency or Relationship

    • B. 

      Controlling the Schedule

    • C. 

      Network Diagram

  • 12. 
    Are inherent in the nature of the work being performed on a project.  For example, you cannot test code until after the code is written 
    • A. 

      Discretionary Dependencies

    • B. 

      External Dependencies

    • C. 

      Mandatory Dependencies

  • 13. 
    Are defined by the project team.  For example, a project team might follow good practice and not start the detailed design of a new information system until the users sign off on all of the analysis work 
    • A. 

      Discretionary Dependencies

    • B. 

      External Dependencies

    • C. 

      Mandatory Dependencies

  • 14. 
    Involves relationships between project and non-project activities.  For example, The installation of a new operating system and other software may depend on delivery of new hardware from an external supplier 
    • A. 

      Discretionary Dependencies

    • B. 

      Mandatory Dependencies

    • C. 

      External Dependencies

  • 15. 
    A schematic display of the logical relationships among, or sequencing, of project activities 
    • A. 

      Burst

    • B. 

      Node

    • C. 

      Network Diagram

  • 16. 
    A network diagramming technique in which activities are represented by arrows and connected at points called nodes to illustrate the sequence of activities 
    • A. 

      Activity On Arrow (AOA) or Arrow Diagramming Method (ADM)

    • B. 

      Network Diagram

    • C. 

      Precedence Diagramming Method (PDM)

  • 17. 
    The starting and ending point of an activity
    • A. 

      Burst

    • B. 

      Node

    • C. 

      Merge

  • 18. 
    Occur when two or more activities follow a single node
    • A. 

      Node

    • B. 

      Merge

    • C. 

      Burst

  • 19. 
    Occurs when two or more nodes precede a single node
    • A. 

      Merge

    • B. 

      Burst

    • C. 

      Node

  • 20. 
    A networking diagram technique in which boxes represent activities 
    • A. 

      Activity On Arrow (AOA) or Arrow Diagramming Method (ADM)

    • B. 

      Estimating Activity Resources

    • C. 

      Precedence Diagramming Method (PDM)

  • 21. 
    A relationship where the “from” activity or predecessor must finish before the “to” activity or successor can start.  This is the most common type of relationship or dependency 
    • A. 

      Start-To Start Dependency

    • B. 

      Finish-To-Finish Dependency

    • C. 

      Finish-To-Start Dependency

  • 22. 
    A relationship in which the “from” activity cannot start until the “to” activity or successor is started 
    • A. 

      Start-To Start Dependency

    • B. 

      Finish-To-Start Dependency

    • C. 

      Finish-To-Finish Dependency

  • 23. 
    A relationship where the “from” activity must be finished before the “to” activity can be finished.  For example, quality control efforts cannot finish before production finishes, although the two can be performed at the same time 
    • A. 

      Finish-To-Start Dependency

    • B. 

      Finish-To-Finish Dependency

    • C. 

      Start-To-Finish Dependency

  • 24. 
    A relationship where the “from” activity must start before the “to” activity can be finished.  For example, a babysitter who wants to finish watching a young child but is dependent on the parent arriving.  The parent must show up or “start” before the babysitter can finish their duty 
    • A. 

      Finish-To-Start Dependency

    • B. 

      Finish-To-Finish Dependency

    • C. 

      Start-To-Finish Dependency