Industrial Radiography Quiz

50 Questions | Total Attempts: 378

SettingsSettingsSettings
Please wait...
Industrial Radiography Quiz

Industrial Radiography quiz for people studying for RT 2 CGSB exam.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Who is given credit for the discovery of X-ray?
    • A. 

      Henri Becquerel

    • B. 

      Wilhelm Roentgen

    • C. 

      Marie Curie

    • D. 

      Pierre Curie

  • 2. 
    There are four types of radiation-matter interactions that can contribute to the total attenuation. These are:
    • A. 

      Compton scattering, pair production, photoelectric absorption, rayleigh scattering

    • B. 

      Compton scattering, electron exchange, photoelectric absorption, rayleigh scattering

    • C. 

      Electron exchange, pair production, photoelectric absorption, rayleigh scattering

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 3. 
    X-rays and Gamma rays are a form of:
    • A. 

      Light

    • B. 

      Particle Radiation

    • C. 

      Electromagnetic Radiation

    • D. 

      Both B and C

  • 4. 
    Who is given credit for the discovery of radioactive materials?
    • A. 

      Henri Becquerel

    • B. 

      Wilhelm Roentgen

    • C. 

      Marie Curie

    • D. 

      Pierre Curie

  • 5. 
    A specific radioactive source will always produce gamma rays at the same:
    • A. 

      Intensity

    • B. 

      Activity

    • C. 

      Energy Levels

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 6. 
    Higher energy radiation will have more:
    • A. 

      Speed

    • B. 

      Incident Intensity

    • C. 

      Penetrating Power

    • D. 

      Both B and C

  • 7. 
    X-rays and Gamma rays present a health risk because they are a form of ionizing radiation, which means that the radiation has enough energy to:
    • A. 

      Vibrate water molecules and generate heat

    • B. 

      Break chemical bonds

    • C. 

      Break physical bonds

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 8. 
    X-rays and Gamma rays have significant penetrating power due to their:
    • A. 

      Short Wavelength

    • B. 

      Medium Wavelength

    • C. 

      Long Wavelength

    • D. 

      Wide range of wavelengths

  • 9. 
    Ionizing radiation can be used in industrial radiography because the health hazards:
    • A. 

      Have been eliminated with controls and procedures

    • B. 

      Are minimized through controls and procedures

    • C. 

      Are worth the risk

    • D. 

      Are being ignored

  • 10. 
    X-rays and Gamma rays:
    • A. 

      Always travel in a straight line

    • B. 

      Can be influenced by an electrical field

    • C. 

      Can be influenced by a magnetic field

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 11. 
    X-rays and Gamma rays are often referred to as photons because:
    • A. 

      They possess a charge

    • B. 

      They have mass

    • C. 

      They occur as small packets of energy

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 12. 
    X-rays and Gamma rays:
    • A. 

      Are both affected by radioactive decay

    • B. 

      Are both produced by a radioactive atom

    • C. 

      Have completely different properties

    • D. 

      Differ only in their source

  • 13. 
    Newtons Inverse Square Law is useful in radiography because it indicates how the radiation intensity is affected by:
    • A. 

      Radioactive decay

    • B. 

      Distance from the source

    • C. 

      The size of the source

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 14. 
    The rate at which a radioactive isotope changes to a more stable atom is know as the:
    • A. 

      Isotope decay rate

    • B. 

      Half-life

    • C. 

      Activity

    • D. 

      Attenuation

  • 15. 
    Attenuation of radiation is due to:
    • A. 

      Absorption

    • B. 

      Scattering

    • C. 

      Radioactive decay

    • D. 

      Both A and B

  • 16. 
    The number of X-ray or Gamma photons that are transmitted through a material depends on the:
    • A. 

      Energy of the photons

    • B. 

      Thickness of the material

    • C. 

      Atomic number of the material

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 17. 
    After traveling through two half-value layers, the incident radiation has been reduced to:
    • A. 

      50%

    • B. 

      35%

    • C. 

      20%

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 18. 
    The thickness of any given material where 50% of the incident energy has been attenuated is known as the:
    • A. 

      Half-value layer

    • B. 

      Linear attenuation coefficient

    • C. 

      Decay rate

    • D. 

      Mass attenuation coefficient

  • 19. 
    Undercut is the loss of resolution at a sharp, thickness transition area due to:
    • A. 

      Scattering within the part

    • B. 

      Backscatter

    • C. 

      Sidescatter

    • D. 

      Scattering within the film

  • 20. 
    Unexposed X-ray film is comprised of a plastic, transparent base coated with an emulsion containing radiation-sensitive particle known as:
    • A. 

      Metalic silver crystals

    • B. 

      Silver halide grains

    • C. 

      Both A and B

    • D. 

      Neither A and B

  • 21. 
    Collimators are used to:
    • A. 

      Reduce the radiation beam spread

    • B. 

      Filter the radiation beam

    • C. 

      Increase film latitude

    • D. 

      Decrease film latitude

  • 22. 
    Bremsstrahlung production of X-rays produces radiation that is composed of:
    • A. 

      A small number of very defined energies

    • B. 

      A continuous spectrum of energies over some range

    • C. 

      Radiation of only one energy

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 23. 
    Exposure to ionizing radiation can be limited:
    • A. 

      With the use of shielding

    • B. 

      By increasing distance form the source

    • C. 

      By limiting the time exposed to the radiation

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 24. 
    X-ray generators produce radiation through:
    • A. 

      Bremsstrahlung processes

    • B. 

      K-shell emmission processes

    • C. 

      Radioactive decay

    • D. 

      Both A and B

  • 25. 
    Manmade sources of radioactive sources are produced by:
    • A. 

      By splitting the nucleus of atoms in the source material

    • B. 

      Adding electrons to the source material

    • C. 

      Introducing an extra neutron to the atoms of the source material

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 26. 
    Two of the more common industrial Gamma-ray sources are:
    • A. 

      Cobalt-60 and iridium-192

    • B. 

      Cobalt-60 and plutonium-240

    • C. 

      Plutonium-240 and uranium-222

    • D. 

      Iridium-192 and Lead-102

  • 27. 
    Stationary lab or shop X-ray systems usually rely on what to limit exposure to the radiation?
    • A. 

      Distance controls

    • B. 

      Time limits

    • C. 

      Shielding

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 28. 
    Radiographic contrast describe:
    • A. 

      The sharpness of lines in a radiograph

    • B. 

      The differences in photographic density in a radiograph

    • C. 

      The average photographic density in a radiograph

    • D. 

      The difference in density between two different radiographs

  • 29. 
    Which of the following does not affect radiographic contrast?
    • A. 

      Attenuation differences in the component being inspected

    • B. 

      The wavelength of the radiaiton used

    • C. 

      The amount of scattered radiation

    • D. 

      The level of current used for the exposure

  • 30. 
    Film contrast is determined by:
    • A. 

      The type of film used

    • B. 

      The process by which the film was developed

    • C. 

      The radiation energy used

    • D. 

      Both A and B

  • 31. 
    When penetrating radiation is directed at a material, the radiation intensity decreases:
    • A. 

      Decreases exponentially with increasing material thickness

    • B. 

      Increase linearly with increasing material thickness

    • C. 

      Decrease linearly with increasing material thickness

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 32. 
    The factor that indicates how much attenuation will take place per centimeter is known as the:
    • A. 

      Mass attenuation coefficient

    • B. 

      Linear attenuation coefficient

    • C. 

      Decay rate

    • D. 

      Atomic number

  • 33. 
    The main advantage of real-time radiography over film is:
    • A. 

      Higher image contrast sensitivity

    • B. 

      Inspection can be performed more rapidly

    • C. 

      Higher image definition

    • D. 

      Lower equipment costs

  • 34. 
    Which two types of radiation-matter interactions account for the majority of attenuation in typical industrial radiography?
    • A. 

      Compton Scattering and photoelectric absorption

    • B. 

      Compton Scattering and pair production

    • C. 

      Pair production and photoelectric absorption

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 35. 
    In comparison with lower-voltage radiographs, high voltage radiographic images have:
    • A. 

      Less contrast sensitivity

    • B. 

      Greater contrast sensitivity

    • C. 

      Greater amounts of scatter radiation relative to primary beam intensity

    • D. 

      Less latitude

  • 36. 
    A radiograph made with an exposure of 8 mAm produces a density of 1.8. The sensitometric curve shows a difference in relative exposure between a density of 1.8 and the target density of 2.5 is 4. What must the new exposure time be to produce a radiograph with a density of 2.5?
    • A. 

      4 mAminutes

    • B. 

      2 mAminutes

    • C. 

      32 mAminutes

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 37. 
    When using geometric magnefication to produce a radiograph, the penumbra will be reduced by:
    • A. 

      A longer exposure

    • B. 

      A faster film speed

    • C. 

      A smaller source spot size

    • D. 

      More X-ray energy

  • 38. 
    When flaws are in unknown locations, radiography is best suited for the detection of:
    • A. 

      Volumetric defects such as porosity

    • B. 

      Tight linear defects such as cracks

    • C. 

      Material delaminations

    • D. 

      The flaw type does not matter

  • 39. 
    The amount of geometric unsharpness in a radiograph is affected by:
    • A. 

      The source to film distance

    • B. 

      The source to object distance

    • C. 

      The size of the source

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 40. 
    Lowering the energy of the radiation used to produce a radiograph will generally result in:
    • A. 

      Less latitude

    • B. 

      Higher contrast sensitivity

    • C. 

      A Longer exposure time

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 41. 
    Radiation beam filters are sometime used in X-ray radiography to:
    • A. 

      Remove some of the low energy radiation to increase definition

    • B. 

      To remove some of the low energy radiation to increase contrast sensitivity

    • C. 

      Remove some of the low energy radiation to reduce definition

    • D. 

      Both A and B

  • 42. 
    Which of the following is not a strength of radiographic inspection?
    • A. 

      It is not limited to material type

    • B. 

      It can be used to inspect assembled components

    • C. 

      It can detect surface and subsurface features

    • D. 

      Access to both side of the test sample is required

  • 43. 
    Image quality indicators (IQIs) provide information about the level of:
    • A. 

      Resolution and contrast sensitivity

    • B. 

      Resolution and film latitude

    • C. 

      Contrast sensitivity and latitude

    • D. 

      Contrast sensitivity only

  • 44. 
    On a film radiograph, an area of high density in the test component will appear:
    • A. 

      Lighter than the surrounding area

    • B. 

      Darker than the surrounding area

    • C. 

      More defined than the surrounding area

    • D. 

      Less defined than the surrounding area

  • 45. 
    The drive cable of a gamma ray exposure device (camera) allows the radiographer to:
    • A. 

      Turn on and shut off the gamma rays from a safe distance

    • B. 

      Adjust the position of the camera from a safe distance

    • C. 

      Move the source in and out of the camera while maintaining a safe distance

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 46. 
    Computed tomography X-ray techniques allow the test component to be:
    • A. 

      Viewed in various cross-sectional slices

    • B. 

      Viewed from different angles

    • C. 

      Analyzed for chemical composition

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 47. 
    • A. 

      They act as a filter to harden the radiation beam

    • B. 

      They reduce the amount of scatter radiation

    • C. 

      Incident radiation liberates electrons which help to expose the film

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 48. 
    Image quality indicators are usually placed:
    • A. 

      Anywhere on the back side of the film

    • B. 

      On the front side of the film near the primary area of interest

    • C. 

      On the front side of the test component in an area of similar thickness to the primary area of interest

    • D. 

      On the back side of the test component in the area of interest

  • 49. 
    Radiographic inspection should be used for crack detection only when:
    • A. 

      The crack is large

    • B. 

      The test component is a casting

    • C. 

      The test component is a weldment

    • D. 

      The orientation of the crack is known

  • 50. 
    The target of an X-ray tube is often made out of tungsten because:
    • A. 

      It has a high atomic mass which will result in more X-rays being generated due to atomic particle interactions

    • B. 

      It is an inexpensive material that is easy to machine

    • C. 

      It have very high thermal conductivity which makes it easy to cool

    • D. 

      None of the above