History Of Technology In Schools

20 Questions | Total Attempts: 182

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Technology Quizzes & Trivia

This is Quiz #1 based on the Social History of Media,Technology and Schooling article, videos and other readings you accessed as part of your Inter-Activity #1. There are 20 questions. YOU MAY ONLY TAKE THE QUIZ ONCE.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The history of technology in schools can best be summed up as which of the following?
    • A. 

      Non-stop educational innovation

    • B. 

      Full of possibility as well as problems

    • C. 

      Unprecedented pedagogical excellence

    • D. 

      Predominantly a failure

  • 2. 
    What term describes the use of educational technology primarily for entertainment or reward?
  • 3. 
    In the 1850s, technology in schools consisted mainly of: (CHECK ALL THAT APPLY)
    • A. 

      Books

    • B. 

      Pencils

    • C. 

      Slate boards

    • D. 

      Maps

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 4. 
    What type(s) of instruction dominated in the 1850s? (CHECK ALL THAT APPLY)
    • A. 

      Recitation

    • B. 

      Lecture

    • C. 

      Silent reading

    • D. 

      Group projects

    • E. 

      Journaling

  • 5. 
    What were the main reasons teachers did not embrace the use of film in the classroom during the 1950s?
    • A. 

      The films were too much like recorded lectures

    • B. 

      There was not enough evidence that they film helped students learn

    • C. 

      The use of film was driven more by technicians than teachers

    • D. 

      Teachers were worried that they would be replaced by film projectors

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 6. 
    Teaching machines were originally built for which group of professionals?
    • A. 

      School psychologists

    • B. 

      Air force specialists

    • C. 

      Math teachers

    • D. 

      Scientists

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 7. 
    The article mentions which of the following benefits to students using teaching machines in the 1960s and 1970s? (CHECK ALL THAT APPLY)
    • A. 

      Technological literacy

    • B. 

      Critical thinking

    • C. 

      Individualized instruction

    • D. 

      Learning through trial and error

    • E. 

      Reinforcement of foreign language skills

  • 8. 
    Classroom TV was criticized by teachers during the 1960s because:
    • A. 

      Teachers came to rely excessively upon it

    • B. 

      TV couldn't stop to answer when a student had a question

    • C. 

      TV could instruct more students from the front of the classroom

    • D. 

      Student interest in reading increased

  • 9. 
    Advantage(s) of using the TV remote control in the classroom is/are:
    • A. 

      Skipping through the commericals

    • B. 

      Pausing a video clip for class discussion

    • C. 

      Learning to program the clock

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 10. 
    Channel One programming was controversial during the 1990s because (check all that apply):
    • A. 

      It did not reduce high drop out rates.

    • B. 

      The equipment did not function properly.

    • C. 

      It forced students to watch commercials during the school day.

    • D. 

      Parents were not allowed to view it.

  • 11. 
    The dominant response by teachers over Channel One in the school classroom was:
    • A. 

      To fast forward the program during the commercials

    • B. 

      To pause the program and ask critical questions

    • C. 

      To use the equipment to produce their own programming

    • D. 

      To just let it play and ignore it

  • 12. 
    Which of the following characteristics of the internet make it an ideal medium for learning?
    • A. 

      Its non-linearity

    • B. 

      Its vast amount of information

    • C. 

      The user's ability to conceptually search for information

    • D. 

      Its anonymity among users

  • 13. 
    According to Grace Dubois, what is the biggest stumbling block to teaching students how to be critical consumers and users of information? 
    • A. 

      The push of bureaucracy and capitalism

    • B. 

      Lack of funding

    • C. 

      Not enough computers

    • D. 

      Ill-prepared teachers

  • 14. 
    About how much money has the U.S. government spent over the past decade to place computers in schools and to connect classrooms to the internet?
    • A. 

      $10 million

    • B. 

      $100 million

    • C. 

      $4 billion

    • D. 

      $40 billion

    • E. 

      We don't know

  • 15. 
    Under NCLB, by the end of what grade should students achieve technological proficiency?
    • A. 

      4th

    • B. 

      8th

    • C. 

      10th

    • D. 

      12th

  • 16. 
    To what does Web 2.0 refer?
    • A. 

      The second generation of the World Wide Web

    • B. 

      Software that resides on the Web rather than on your computer

    • C. 

      Information on demand

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 17. 
    Which of the following is NOT part of the media literacy cycle?
    • A. 

      Access

    • B. 

      Analyze

    • C. 

      Evaluate

    • D. 

      Print

    • E. 

      Communicate

  • 18. 
    Web 2.0 technologies can facilitate a shift from young people as consumers of information to young people as what?
    • A. 

      Savvy consumers

    • B. 

      Critical consumers

    • C. 

      Responsible citizens

    • D. 

      Social recluses

  • 19. 
    Despte dramatic developments in media and technology over the past 50 years, schooling has remained very much the same in terms of which of the following?
    • A. 

      Parent involvement

    • B. 

      Drive for efficiency

    • C. 

      Protectionist policies

    • D. 

      Democratic education

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 20. 
    Which of the following is NOT an example of Web 2.0?
    • A. 

      Electronic Whiteboard

    • B. 

      Blog (or web log)

    • C. 

      Podcast

    • D. 

      Google documents

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