First Patho Quiz

50 Questions | Total Attempts: 102

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Pathology Quizzes & Trivia

Intro from Cell Adaptations to Hemodynamic disorders


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    What is Serous Inflammation characterized by?
    • A. 

      The mildest form of inflammation, characterized by exudation of fluid (mostly albumin), a clear- like serum. (i.e. early stages of pneumonia)

    • B. 

      Severe inflammation, characterized by fibrinous exudate, occurs in larger vascular tissue, seen in bacterial infections (pericarditis)

    • C. 

      Inflammation caused by pus-forming bacteria, such as Staph or Strep. Pus may accumulate on mucous, skin, or internal organs (bacterial meningitis)

    • D. 

      Inflammation of body surfaces of mucosa and hollow organs (stomach or intestines) or a loss of epithelial lining

    • E. 

      Inflammation characterized by exudate of fibrin, pus, cell debris, and mucous form a pseudomembrane on the surface of ulcers

  • 2. 
    Ulcerative inflammation?
    • A. 

      Inflammation characterized by exudate of fibrin, pus, cell debris, and mucous form a pseudomembrane on the surface of ulcers

    • B. 

      Inflammation caused by pus-forming bacteria, such as Staph or Strep. Pus may accumulate on mucous, skin, or internal organs (bacterial meningitis)

    • C. 

      Inflammation of body surfaces of mucosa and hollow organs (stomach or intestines) or a loss of epithelial lining

    • D. 

      Severe inflammation, characterized by fibrinous exudate, occurs in larger vascular tissue, seen in bacterial infections (pericarditis)

    • E. 

      The mildest form of inflammation, characterized by exudation of fluid (mostly albumin), a clear- like serum. (i.e. early stages of pneumonia)

  • 3. 
    Purulent Inflammation?
    • A. 

      Inflammation of body surfaces of mucosa and hollow organs (stomach or intestines) or a loss of epithelial lining

    • B. 

      The mildest form of inflammation, characterized by exudation of fluid (mostly albumin), a clear- like serum. (i.e. early stages of pneumonia)

    • C. 

      Inflammation characterized by exudate of fibrin, pus, cell debris, and mucous form a pseudomembrane on the surface of ulcers

    • D. 

      Inflammation caused by pus-forming bacteria (dead or dying PMNs), such as Staph or Strep. Pus may accumulate on mucous, skin, or internal organs (bacterial meningitis)

    • E. 

      Severe inflammation, characterized by fibrinous exudate, occurs in larger vascular tissue, seen in bacterial infections (pericarditis)

  • 4. 
    Pseudomembranous Infammation?
    • A. 

      Inflammation caused by pus-forming bacteria (dead or dying PMNs), such as Staph or Strep. Pus may accumulate on mucous, skin, or internal organs (bacterial meningitis)

    • B. 

      Severe inflammation, characterized by fibrinous exudate, occurs in larger vascular tissue, seen in bacterial infections (pericarditis)

    • C. 

      Inflammation characterized by exudate of fibrin, pus, cell debris, and mucous form a pseudomembrane on the surface of ulcers

    • D. 

      Inflammation of body surfaces of mucosa and hollow organs (stomach or intestines) or a loss of epithelial lining

    • E. 

      The mildest form of inflammation, characterized by exudation of fluid (mostly albumin), a clear- like serum. (i.e. early stages of pneumonia)

  • 5. 
    Fibrinous Inflammation?
    • A. 

      Inflammation of body surfaces of mucosa and hollow organs (stomach or intestines) or a loss of epithelial lining

    • B. 

      Severe inflammation, characterized by fibrinous exudate, occurs in larger vascular tissue, seen in bacterial infections (pericarditis)

    • C. 

      Inflammation characterized by exudate of fibrin, pus, cell debris, and mucous form a pseudomembrane on the surface of ulcers

    • D. 

      The mildest form of inflammation, characterized by exudation of fluid (mostly albumin), a clear- like serum. (i.e. early stages of pneumonia)

    • E. 

      Inflammation caused by pus-forming bacteria (dead or dying PMNs), such as Staph or Strep. Pus may accumulate on mucous, skin, or internal organs (bacterial meningitis)

  • 6. 
    Chronic Inflammation is marked by what exudate contents?
    • A. 

      Basophils, Neutrophils, Heparin

    • B. 

      PMNs, fibrin, granulocytes

    • C. 

      Fibrin, lymph, parenchymal cells

    • D. 

      Neutrophils, macrophages, plasmin, fibrin

    • E. 

      Lymph, macrophages, plasma cells

  • 7. 
    Granulomatous Inflammation is caused by what?
    • A. 

      Antigens that evoke a cell mediated hypersensitivity or antigens at the site

    • B. 

      Viral induced inflammation

    • C. 

      A secondary liquefaction of tissue due to an initial inflammation

    • D. 

      Dead or dying PMNs

    • E. 

      Prolonged inflammation and irritation to tissues

  • 8. 
    The prototype for a Granulomatous disease is what?
    • A. 

      Serous pleuritis

    • B. 

      Ulceritive colitis

    • C. 

      Tuberculosis

    • D. 

      Acute bacterial meningitis

    • E. 

      Pelvic inflammatory disease

  • 9. 
    What is an a liquid emboli?
    • A. 

      A bolus of fat that has entered veins (usually after fx)

    • B. 

      A large piece of tissue that become necrotic, been released and enteres vascular system

    • C. 

      A piece of plaque from an atherosclerotic artery

    • D. 

      Bone marrow

    • E. 

      Air injected into veins

  • 10. 
    What is a thrombus?
    • A. 

      A liquid bolus carried through the vascular system

    • B. 

      Plaque that has been released from a vessel wall and floating through the vascular system

    • C. 

      A mass of fat moving in the arterial system

    • D. 

      A mass that was once liquid, but now solid containing blood cells and fat

    • E. 

      Bone marrow aggregate that has entered the vascular system

  • 11. 
    Thrombi are classified as either Red or White, which type of thrombi is: smaller, composed of tightly intermixed RBC's and fibrin?
  • 12. 
    A venous emboli that reaches arterial circulation through the foramen ovale is called
    • A. 

      Arterial

    • B. 

      Paradoxical

    • C. 

      Intramural

    • D. 

      Venous

    • E. 

      Microvascular

  • 13. 
    Arterial Emboli usually end up where?
    • A. 

      Pulmonary arteries

    • B. 

      Subpleaural space

    • C. 

      Aorta

    • D. 

      Middle cerebral artery

    • E. 

      Left ventricle

  • 14. 
    Saddle emboli is characterized by
    • A. 

      Large venous clots at the entry of a main pulmonary artery causing acute right heart failure and severe hypotension

    • B. 

      A small arterial clot which will lodge in the middle cerebral artery

    • C. 

      An aggregate of bone marrow released due to CPR

    • D. 

      Amniotic fluid which has reached the venous system

    • E. 

      An air embolism traveling through a vein

  • 15. 
    Insufficiences of blood supply with sudden onset, resulting in ischemic necrosis are called
    • A. 

      Infection

    • B. 

      Hemorrhage

    • C. 

      Gangrene

    • D. 

      Inflammation

    • E. 

      Infarction

  • 16. 
    White Infarts are characterized by what type of occlusion, place of occlusion, and another prominent identifiable mark?
  • 17. 
    The only cardiac infarct that ruptures is?
    • A. 

      Red infarct

    • B. 

      Transmural

    • C. 

      Paradoxical

    • D. 

      White

    • E. 

      Saddle emboli

  • 18. 
    Hypovolemic Shock alone results from?
    • A. 

      Pump failure of heart

    • B. 

      Bacterium containing LPS that die in body and cause DIC

    • C. 

      Hypoperfusion

    • D. 

      Loss of circulatory fluid volume

    • E. 

      Don't know?!?

  • 19. 
    Cardiogenic shock is due to pump failure of the heart, commonly secondary to infarct. This can result in what (hint only special to the loss of pump failure)?
    • A. 

      Waterhouse-friderechsen syndrome

    • B. 

      Hypoperfusion

    • C. 

      Arrythmia

    • D. 

      Somnolence

    • E. 

      Oligouria

  • 20. 
    Metaplasia is
    • A. 

      Disordered growth of cells

    • B. 

      Adaptive change from one cell type to another

    • C. 

      Uncontrolled undifferenciation of cells

    • D. 

      New growth of cells

    • E. 

      Loss of functionality of cells

  • 21. 
    Hallmarks of anaplasia are:marked nuclear/cellular __________high numbers of ________________nuclear:cytoplasm ratio of _______USE COMMAS
  • 22. 
    The best example of Dysplasia is? (according to Fisch)
    • A. 

      Squamous cell carcinoma

    • B. 

      Melanoma

    • C. 

      Leukemia

    • D. 

      Dysplastic Anemia

    • E. 

      Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

  • 23. 
    Do all neoplastic cells lead to tumors?
  • 24. 
    The major difference macroscopically of benign tumors and malignant tumors is
    • A. 

      Evenly distributed nuclei

    • B. 

      Well developed cytoplasm

    • C. 

      Encapsulation

    • D. 

      New features to cells not inherent to type of cell

    • E. 

      Uniform population

  • 25. 
    Not sharply demarcated from normal tissue, lacking sharp borders, poorly developed cytoplasm, and large nuclei are characteristics of?
    • A. 

      Blood disorders

    • B. 

      Macroscopic findings of melignant tumors

    • C. 

      Microscopic findings of benign tumors

    • D. 

      Microscopic findings of melignant tumors

    • E. 

      Alzheimer's

  • 26. 
    An example of a lymphatic pathway of metastasis is?
    • A. 

      Melanoma

    • B. 

      Squamous cell carcinoma in lungs

    • C. 

      Seeding of renal cell carcinoma to adrenal gland

    • D. 

      Leukemia

    • E. 

      Breast cancer

  • 27. 
    A neoplasm made up of all 3 germ layers is called?
  • 28. 
    When environmental changes exceed the ability of a cell to maintian homeostasis, adapt and cause cell death is?
    • A. 

      Necrosis

    • B. 

      Irreversible cell injury

    • C. 

      Hemmorhage

    • D. 

      Reversible cell injury

    • E. 

      Emboli

  • 29. 
    Irreversible cell damage causes damage to the nucleus; when fragmentation of the nucleus occurs and the chromatin is distributed irregularly it is called?
    • A. 

      Karyolysis

    • B. 

      Karyorrhexis

    • C. 

      Pyknosis

    • D. 

      No bueno!

    • E. 

      Bummer

  • 30. 
    A specialized form of liquefaction necrosis is?
    • A. 

      Caseous Necrosis

    • B. 

      Coagulative Necrosis

    • C. 

      Fat Necrosis

    • D. 

      Liquefactive Necrosis

    • E. 

      Purulent

  • 31. 
    Autolysis is different than necrosis because it only occurs ??
  • 32. 
    Caseous Necrosis is characterized by?
    • A. 

      Denaturing of proteins, cytoplasm appears slightly granulated

    • B. 

      Tissue becomes soft-gel-like due to certain enzyme

    • C. 

      Lipolytic enzymes cause liquifaction

    • D. 

      A thick, yellow, cheesy substance forms

    • E. 

      Necrosis

  • 33. 
    The most common form of necrosis is?
    • A. 

      Fat

    • B. 

      Liquifaction

    • C. 

      Caseous

    • D. 

      Coagulative

    • E. 

      Gross! :-x

  • 34. 
    Necrotic tissue attracts calicium, which can undergo calcification--ranging from sand-like to rock-hard material is called?
    • A. 

      Emboli

    • B. 

      Metastatic Calcification

    • C. 

      Granuloma

    • D. 

      Dystrophic Calcification

    • E. 

      Blah blah

  • 35. 
    A non-specific but predictable response of living tissue due to injury is called?
  • 36. 
    What type of Necrosis?
    • A. 

      Caseous

    • B. 

      Coagulative

    • C. 

      Fat

    • D. 

      Liquefactive

  • 37. 
    What type of necrosis?
    • A. 

      Coagulative

    • B. 

      Liquefactive

    • C. 

      Caseous

    • D. 

      Fat

  • 38. 
    Which type of necrosis?
    • A. 

      Fat

    • B. 

      Caseous

    • C. 

      Coagulative

    • D. 

      Liquefactive

  • 39. 
    Which type of necrosis is this?
    • A. 

      Caseous

    • B. 

      Coagulative

    • C. 

      Fat

    • D. 

      Liquefactive

  • 40. 
    What type of necrosis?
    • A. 

      Caseous

    • B. 

      Coagulative

    • C. 

      Fat

    • D. 

      Liquefactive

  • 41. 
    What type of tumor is this??
    • A. 

      Adenoma

    • B. 

      Osteoma

    • C. 

      Leiomyoma

    • D. 

      Meningioma

  • 42. 
      Is this a benign tumor or melignant?
  • 43. 
    ReWhat type of necrosis is this?
    • A. 

      Caseous

    • B. 

      Coagulative

    • C. 

      Liquefactive

    • D. 

      Fat

  • 44. 
    This cell changes is one of the hallmarks of anaplasia, which one is it?
    • A. 

      High mitotoc figures

    • B. 

      Nuclei:Cytoplasm ratio

    • C. 

      Marked pleomorhphism

    • D. 

      Metastasis

    • E. 

      Neoplasia

  • 45. 
    Which is not a cause of cell injury?
    • A. 

      Ischemia

    • B. 

      Physical trauma

    • C. 

      Genetic Defects

    • D. 

      Bacterial Disease

    • E. 

      Chemical Agents

  • 46. 
    What occurs in stage 2 of cellular death?
    • A. 

      Necrosis

    • B. 

      Swelling of cell and release of lysosomal enzymes

    • C. 

      Liquifying of tissues

    • D. 

      Loss of function

    • E. 

      Go back and look

  • 47. 
    An abnormal passageway between two endothelium-lined organs or between two blood vessels that don't normally connect
    • A. 

      Pustule

    • B. 

      Abscess

    • C. 

      Anestemosis

    • D. 

      Fistula

  • 48. 
    Has to do with anaplasia and is classified using roman numerals
    • A. 

      Staging

    • B. 

      Grading

    • C. 

      TMN system

  • 49. 
    This is...
    • A. 

      Caseating

    • B. 

      Non-Caseating

  • 50. 
    • A. 

      Caseating

    • B. 

      Non-Caseating