Cardiac Math Formulas (A&p2 @ Gwinnett Tech)

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| By Yobeccah
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Quizzes Created: 4 | Total Attempts: 4,935
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Cardiac Quizzes & Trivia

A method for drilling/practicing the formulas for Cardiac Math. .


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    If a patient has a blood pressure of 120/80, what would the Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP) be? (Note, MAP = DP+(PP/3), PP=SP-DP)

    • A.

      120

    • B.

      80

    • C.

      93.33

    • D.

      133.33

    Correct Answer
    C. 93.33
    Explanation
    The Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP) is calculated by adding one-third of the Pulse Pressure (PP) to the Diastolic Pressure (DP). The Pulse Pressure is obtained by subtracting the Systolic Pressure (SP) from the Diastolic Pressure (DP). In this case, the DP is 80 and the PP is 120-80=40. Therefore, one-third of 40 is 13.33. Adding 13.33 to 80 gives a MAP of 93.33.

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  • 2. 

    If a patient has a blood pressure of 160/110, what would the Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP) be?  (Note, MAP = DP+(PP/3), PP=SP-DP)

    • A.

      126.67

    • B.

      176.67

    • C.

      160

    • D.

      110

    Correct Answer
    A. 126.67
  • 3. 

    If a patient has a blood pressure of 97/60, what would the Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP) be?  (Note, MAP = DP+(PP/3), PP=SP-DP)

    • A.

      60

    • B.

      109.33

    • C.

      97

    • D.

      72.33

    Correct Answer
    D. 72.33
    Explanation
    To calculate the Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP) using the formula MAP = DP + (PP/3), where DP is the diastolic pressure and PP is the pulse pressure (systolic pressure minus diastolic pressure):
    Given: Diastolic Pressure (DP) = 60 mmHg Systolic Pressure (SP) = 97 mmHg
    Pulse Pressure (PP) = SP - DP = 97 - 60 = 37 mmHg
    Now, substitute the values into the formula:
    MAP = DP + (PP/3) = 60 + (37/3) ≈ 60 + 12.33 ≈ 72.33 mmHg
    So, the Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP) would be approximately 72.33 mmHg. Therefore, the correct answer is 72.33.

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  • 4. 

    A patient has a heart rate of 65bpm and a stroke volume(SV) of 70ml, what would the cardiac output (CO)? (Note: CO=SV*HR, 1000ml = 1L)

    • A.

      4550L/minute

    • B.

      4.55L/minute

    • C.

      45.50L/minute

    • D.

      5.2L/minute

    Correct Answer
    B. 4.55L/minute
    Explanation
    The cardiac output (CO) is calculated by multiplying the stroke volume (SV) by the heart rate (HR). In this case, the SV is given as 70ml and the HR is given as 65bpm. To calculate the CO, we multiply 70ml by 65bpm. Since 1000ml is equal to 1L, we convert the result to liters by dividing by 1000. Therefore, the cardiac output is 4.55L/minute.

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  • 5. 

    A patient has a heart rate of 78bpm and a stroke volume(SV) of 80ml, what would the cardiac output (CO)? (Note: CO=SV*HR, 1000ml = 1L)

    • A.

      5.92L/minute

    • B.

      7.8L/minute

    • C.

      6.24L/minute

    • D.

      1.22L/minute

    Correct Answer
    C. 6.24L/minute
    Explanation
    The cardiac output (CO) is calculated by multiplying the stroke volume (SV) by the heart rate (HR). In this case, the SV is given as 80ml and the HR is given as 78bpm. To find the CO, we need to convert the SV to liters by dividing it by 1000 (1L = 1000ml). Therefore, the SV becomes 0.08L. Multiplying the SV (0.08L) by the HR (78bpm), we get a CO of 6.24L/minute.

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  • 6. 

    A patient has a heart rate of 45bpm and a stroke volume(SV) of 59ml, what would the cardiac output (CO)? (Note: CO=SV*HR, 1000ml = 1L)

    • A.

      2.66L/minute

    • B.

      2650L/minute

    • C.

      6.22L/minute

    • D.

      1.33L/minute

    Correct Answer
    A. 2.66L/minute
    Explanation
    The cardiac output is calculated by multiplying the stroke volume (SV) by the heart rate (HR). In this case, the stroke volume is given as 59ml and the heart rate is given as 45bpm. To find the cardiac output, we multiply these two values together. 59ml * 45bpm = 2655ml/minute. However, the question asks for the answer in liters, so we divide the result by 1000 to convert milliliters to liters. 2655ml/minute / 1000 = 2.655L/minute. Rounding to two decimal places, the cardiac output is approximately 2.66L/minute.

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  • 7. 

    A patient has a blood pressure of 180/120, a heart rate of 87bmp, a stroke volume(SV) of 70ml and an ESV(End Systolic Volume) of 90ml. What is the EDV(End Diastolic Volume)? (Note: EDV=ESV+SV)

    • A.

      160ml

    • B.

      20ml

    • C.

      60ml

    • D.

      157ml

    Correct Answer
    A. 160ml
    Explanation
    To find the End Diastolic Volume (EDV), you can use the formula:
    EDV = ESV + SV
    Given:
    ESV (End Systolic Volume) = 90 ml
    SV (Stroke Volume) = 70 ml
    Substitute these values into the formula:
    EDV = 90 ml + 70 ml = 160 ml
    So, the End Diastolic Volume (EDV) is 160 ml.

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  • 8. 

    A patient has a stroke volume(SV) of 47ml and an ESV(End Systolic Volume) of 72ml. What is the EDV(End Diastolic Volume)? (Note: EDV=ESV+SV)

    • A.

      72ml

    • B.

      338ml

    • C.

      119ml

    • D.

      25ml

    Correct Answer
    C. 119ml
    Explanation
    The EDV (End Diastolic Volume) is calculated by adding the ESV (End Systolic Volume) and the SV (Stroke Volume). In this case, the ESV is given as 72ml and the SV is given as 47ml. Adding these two values together, we get 72ml + 47ml = 119ml. Therefore, the correct answer is 119ml.

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  • 9. 

    A patient has a blood pressure of 120/80, a stroke volume(SV) of 70ml and an EDV(End Diastolic Volume) of 140ml. What is the ESV(End Systolic Volume)? (Note: EDV=ESV+SV, so ESV = ?)

    • A.

      150ml

    • B.

      140ml

    • C.

      70ml

    • D.

      1.2L

    Correct Answer
    C. 70ml
    Explanation
    The ESV (End Systolic Volume) can be calculated by subtracting the SV (Stroke Volume) from the EDV (End Diastolic Volume). In this case, the EDV is given as 140ml and the SV is given as 70ml. Therefore, the ESV would be 140ml - 70ml = 70ml.

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  • 10. 

    A patient has a stroke volume(SV) of 66ml and an EDV(End Diastolic Volume) of 116ml. What is the ESV(End Systolic Volume)? (Note: EDV=ESV+SV, so ESV = ?)

    • A.

      66ml

    • B.

      50ml

    • C.

      182ml

    • D.

      1.8L

    Correct Answer
    B. 50ml
    Explanation
    The correct answer is 50ml. The equation EDV = ESV + SV is used to calculate the end systolic volume (ESV). Given that the stroke volume (SV) is 66ml and the end diastolic volume (EDV) is 116ml, we can rearrange the equation to solve for ESV. Subtracting SV from EDV gives us ESV = EDV - SV, which equals 116ml - 66ml = 50ml. Therefore, the end systolic volume is 50ml.

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  • 11. 

    If the EDV is 100ml and the SV is 70ml, ESV will be ?

    • A.

      30ml

    • B.

      170ml

    • C.

      .7ml

    • D.

      1.43ml

    Correct Answer
    A. 30ml
    Explanation
    The ESV (End Systolic Volume) is the amount of blood remaining in the ventricle after contraction. It can be calculated by subtracting the SV (Stroke Volume) from the EDV (End Diastolic Volume). In this case, the EDV is given as 100ml and the SV is given as 70ml. Subtracting 70ml from 100ml gives us an ESV of 30ml.

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  • 12. 

    Stroke Volume X Heart Rate =

    • A.

      Cardiac Output

    • B.

      Cardiac Cycle

    • C.

      Blood Pressure

    • D.

      Pulse Pressure

    Correct Answer
    A. Cardiac Output
    Explanation
    The equation Stroke Volume X Heart Rate = Cardiac Output is a fundamental equation in cardiovascular physiology. Stroke volume refers to the amount of blood pumped out of the heart with each contraction, while heart rate is the number of times the heart beats per minute. Cardiac output is the total volume of blood pumped by the heart per minute and is determined by multiplying stroke volume by heart rate. Therefore, the correct answer is Cardiac Output.

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  • 13. 

    Length of the cardiac cycle if the heart rate is 70

    • A.

      0.3seconds

    • B.

      0.7seconds

    • C.

      1.2seconds

    • D.

      0.8seconds

    Correct Answer
    D. 0.8seconds
    Explanation
    The length of the cardiac cycle is determined by the heart rate, which is the number of times the heart beats per minute. In this case, the heart rate is given as 70 beats per minute. To calculate the length of the cardiac cycle, we divide 60 (seconds in a minute) by the heart rate. Therefore, 60/70 ≈ 0.857 seconds, which is closest to 0.8 seconds.

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  • 14. 

    Length of the cardiac cycle if the heart rate is 95

    • A.

      0.63seconds

    • B.

      0.95seconds

    • C.

      0.70seconds

    • D.

      1.8seconds

    Correct Answer
    A. 0.63seconds
    Explanation
    The length of the cardiac cycle is determined by the heart rate, which is the number of times the heart beats per minute. In this case, the heart rate is given as 95 beats per minute. To calculate the length of the cardiac cycle, we divide 60 seconds (1 minute) by the heart rate. So, 60/95 = 0.63 seconds. This means that each cardiac cycle lasts for approximately 0.63 seconds when the heart rate is 95 beats per minute.

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  • 15. 

    How long would the diastole portion of the cardiac cycle be if the heart rate is 78bpm? (Note, Systole is always .3seconds)

    • A.

      1.3seconds

    • B.

      0.47seconds

    • C.

      0.3seconds

    • D.

      0.71seconds

    Correct Answer
    B. 0.47seconds
    Explanation
    The diastole portion of the cardiac cycle refers to the relaxation phase of the heart. The systole phase is always 0.3 seconds, so to calculate the duration of diastole, we need to subtract the systole phase from the total duration of one cardiac cycle. The total duration of one cardiac cycle can be calculated by dividing 60 seconds (1 minute) by the heart rate, which is 78 beats per minute. So, 60/78 equals approximately 0.77 seconds. Subtracting the systole phase of 0.3 seconds from this total duration gives us 0.47 seconds, which is the duration of the diastole portion of the cardiac cycle.

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  • 16. 

    EDV - SV is what

    • A.

      ESV

    • B.

      PP

    • C.

      CC

    • D.

      CO

    Correct Answer
    A. ESV
  • 17. 

    EDV is found by adding the SV to what?

    • A.

      CC

    • B.

      CO

    • C.

      EF

    • D.

      ESV

    Correct Answer
    D. ESV
    Explanation
    EDV stands for End-Diastolic Volume, which is the volume of blood in the ventricles at the end of diastole, or relaxation phase of the cardiac cycle. ESV, on the other hand, stands for End-Systolic Volume, which is the volume of blood in the ventricles at the end of systole, or contraction phase of the cardiac cycle. Therefore, EDV is found by adding the ESV to the Stroke Volume (SV), which is the volume of blood ejected from the ventricles during systole.

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  • 18. 

    DP+ (PP/3) is equal to what?

    • A.

      EDV

    • B.

      SV

    • C.

      MAP

    • D.

      CC

    Correct Answer
    C. MAP
    Explanation
    DP+ (PP/3) is equal to MAP, which stands for Mean Arterial Pressure. Mean Arterial Pressure is a measure of the average pressure in the arteries during one cardiac cycle. It is calculated by adding the Diastolic Pressure (DP) to one-third of the Pulse Pressure (PP). This formula gives an estimation of the average pressure in the arteries, which is an important parameter in assessing cardiovascular health.

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  • 19. 

    A patient with a stroke volume of 80ml, an EDV of 170ml has an Ejection Fraction of?

    • A.

      47%

    • B.

      90%

    • C.

      72%

    • D.

      50%

    Correct Answer
    A. 47%
    Explanation
    The ejection fraction (EF) is calculated by dividing the stroke volume (SV) by the end-diastolic volume (EDV) and multiplying by 100. In this case, the stroke volume is 80ml and the end-diastolic volume is 170ml. So, the calculation would be (80/170) * 100 = 47%. Therefore, the correct answer is 47%.

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  • 20. 

    A patient with a stroke volume of 68ml, an EDV of 118ml has an Ejection Fraction of?

    • A.

      72%

    • B.

      58%

    • C.

      12%

    • D.

      WHAT?!

    Correct Answer
    B. 58%
    Explanation
    The ejection fraction is calculated by dividing the stroke volume by the end-diastolic volume and multiplying by 100. In this case, the stroke volume is 68ml and the end-diastolic volume is 118ml. Dividing 68 by 118 and multiplying by 100 gives a result of approximately 57.6%. Rounded to the nearest whole number, the ejection fraction is 58%.

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Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 27, 2024
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Oct 10, 2012
    Quiz Created by
    Yobeccah
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