Psych 135 UCLA Social Psych Shapiro Ch. 1/2

25 Questions

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Psych Quizzes & Trivia

Social psychology midterm!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    What is the sociocultural perspective?
    • A. 

      A rule or expectation for appropriate social behavior

    • B. 

      The beliefs, customs, habits, and language shared by the people living in a particular time and place

    • C. 

      Theoretical viewpoint that searches for the causes of social behavior in influences from larger social groups

  • 2. 
    The correlational method has two advantages: BLANK variables and BLANK BLANK and suffers from two disadvantages: the BLANK problem and the third variable problem
  • 3. 
    Describe the self serving bias
    • A. 

      Tendency to see ourselves as more favorable then we might actually be (IE biased to see ourselves as above average)

    • B. 

      Tendency to believe you "knew it all along"

    • C. 

      Tendency to believe we should be different every time, repeating doesn't seem random

    • D. 

      Tendency to believe we are in control when we are not (IE heads and tails flipping

  • 4. 
    Natural selection?
    • A. 

      A theoretical viewpoint that searches for the causes of social behavior in the physical and psychological predispositions that helped our ancestors survive and reproduce

    • B. 

      The process by which characteristics that help animals survive and reproduce are passed on to their offspring

    • C. 

      A characteristic that is well designed for survival and reproduction in a particular environment

  • 5. 
    What is a confounding variable?
    • A. 

      One that systematically changes along with the independent variable, potentially leading to a mistake conclusion about the effect of an independent variable

    • B. 

      When subjects drop out of a multi-session study over time

    • C. 

      One that depends on self-selection: who chooses to participate in your study

  • 6. 
    Self report doesn't always work because
    • A. 

      They are indirect and less involving, scientists aren't interested in what you say you will do... they're interested in what you actually do!

    • B. 

      Social desirability - you have an idea of what you are supposed to say

    • C. 

      Sometimes we are simply wrong - we don't know of have insight into our own behaviors

    • D. 

      All the above

  • 7. 
    The experimental method 
    • A. 

      The experimental factor that a researcher manipulated

    • B. 

      The variable being measures

    • C. 

      The only way to determine causality, the only way to rule out the directionality problem and the third variable problem

    • D. 

      We manipulate one or two independent variables while trying to hold everything else constant

    • E. 

      The process of assigning participants to the conditions of an experiment such that all persons have the same chance of being in a given conditions

  • 8. 
    What is the observational method of psychology?
    • A. 

      One in which every person in the population being studied has an equal chance of inclusion

    • B. 

      Simply documents that rate or level of behavior

    • C. 

      A study in which we observe two behaviors simultaneously to see if they correlate

  • 9. 
    "explicit" thinking that is deliberate, reflective, and conscious; ironic effects of thought suppression --> "rebound effect" IE don't think about white bears 
  • 10. 
    What is the "interactionist perspective"?
    • A. 

      Features or characteristics that individuals carry into social situations

    • B. 

      Behavior plus person

    • C. 

      Environmental events or circumstances outside the person

    • D. 

      Drives us toward desires outcomes

    • E. 

      A desired outcome

  • 11. 
    Social learning perspective
    • A. 

      A theoretical viewpoint that focuses on past learning experiences as determinants of a person's social behaviors

    • B. 

      A theoretical viewpoint that focuses on the mental processes involved in paying attention to, interpreting, and remembering social experiences

    • C. 

      Procedure for measuring or recording behaviors, thoughts, and feelings in their natural state (including naturalistic observations, case studies, archival studies, surveys, and psych tests)

    • D. 

      Recording everyday behaviors as they unfold in their natural settings

  • 12. 
    Observer bias
    • A. 

      The extent to which the findings of a particular research study extend to other similar circumstances or cases

    • B. 

      Error introduced into measurement when an observer overemphasizes behaviors he or she expects to find and fails to notice behaviors he or she does not expect

    • C. 

      A group of respondents having characteristics that match those of the larger population the researcher wants to describe

  • 13. 
    The ability of a behavior or cognitive process to operate without conscious guidance once it's put into motion, a type of processing- well practices- limited attention 
  • 14. 
    Demand characteristic 
    • A. 

      The extent to which an experiment allows confident statements about cause and effect

    • B. 

      The extent to which the results of an experiment can be generalized to other circumstances

    • C. 

      Cue that makes participants aware of how the experimenter expects them to behave

    • D. 

      The manipulation of independent variables using unknowing variables using unknowing participants in natural settings

  • 15. 
    Will power
    • A. 

      The self-control strength used to overcome counterproductive impulses to achieve difficult goals

    • B. 

      A mental representation capturing our views and beliefs about ourselves. The answers to the question "who am ?"

    • C. 

      A mental representation of a specific episode, event, or individual

    • D. 

      A mental representation capturing the general characteristics of a particular class of episodes, events or individuals

  • 16. 
    How do we acquire info about ourselves? 
    • A. 

      Reflected appraisal process

    • B. 

      Looking in the mirror

    • C. 

      Social comparison

    • D. 

      Loving ourselves

  • 17. 
    The process through people come to know themselves by observing or imagining how others view them: 
  • 18. 
    Self-regulation
    • A. 

      An opportunity or threat provided by a situation

    • B. 

      The process though which we try to control the impressions people for of us

    • C. 

      The process through which people select, monitor and adjust their strategies in an attempt to reach their goals

  • 19. 
    Effects of social comparison: assimilation and 
  • 20. 
    Priming
    • A. 

      The process of activating knowledge or goals, of making them ready for use

    • B. 

      Favorable or unfavorable evaluations of a particular person, object, event or idea

    • C. 

      Relatively intense feelings characterized by physiological arousal and complex cognitions

    • D. 

      Relatively long-lasting feelings that are diffuse and not directed toward particular targets

  • 21. 
    Judgement of self changes to become more similar to the target (IE thinking about an extremely smart peer makes you feel smarter than you did before)
  • 22. 
    Judgment of self changes to become more different from the target (IE thinking about an extremely smart peer makes you feel dumber than you did before) 
  • 23. 
    Self perception 
    • A. 

      The tendency for intrinsic motivation to diminish for activities that have become associated with reward or other extrinsic factors

    • B. 

      Stepping outside or ourselves, or the process through which people observe their own behavior to infer their own internal characteristics such as traits, abilities and attitudes

    • C. 

      Current psychological state and thoughts

    • D. 

      A set of norms that defines how people in a given social position out to behave

  • 24. 
    The process of imagining alternative "might have been" versions of actual events 
  • 25. 
    Social comparison 
    • A. 

      The process of comparing ourselves with those who are less well of

    • B. 

      The process of comparing ourselves with those who are better off than ourselves

    • C. 

      Come to know ourselves by comparing abilities, attitudes, and beliefs with those of others