Organizational Behaviour Chapter 5

31 Questions | Total Attempts: 1142

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Organizational Behaviour Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The forces within a person that affect the direction, intensity, and persistence of voluntary behaviour. When employees are willing the exert a particular level of effort (intensity), for a certain of time (persistence), toward a particular goal (direction).
    • A. 

      Drives

    • B. 

      Motivation

    • C. 

      Employee engagement

    • D. 

      Needs

    • E. 

      Maslow's needs hierachy theory

  • 2. 
    The employee's emotional and cognitive motivation, self-efficacy to perform the job, a clear understanding of his or her role in the organization's vision, and a belief that he or she has the resources to perform their job.
    • A. 

      Learned needs theory

    • B. 

      Maslow's needs hiearchy theory

    • C. 

      Needs

    • D. 

      Drives

    • E. 

      Employee engagement

  • 3. 
    Neutral states that energize individuals to correct deficiencies or maintain an internal equilibrium. Also called primary needs, fundamental needs, or innate motives. Prime movers of behaviour by activating emotions.
    • A. 

      Motivation

    • B. 

      Drives

    • C. 

      Employee engagement

    • D. 

      Needs

    • E. 

      Learned needs theory

  • 4. 
    Goal-directed forces that people experience. The individual's self-concept (including personality and values), social norms, and past experience amplify or suppress emotions which results in stronger or weaker ones.
    • A. 

      Learned needs theory

    • B. 

      Drives

    • C. 

      Maslow's needs hierachy theory

    • D. 

      Motivation

    • E. 

      Needs

  • 5. 
    A motivation theory arranged in a hierachy, whereby people are motivated to fulfill a higher need as a lower one becomes gratified. The strongest sources is the lowest unsatisfied need at the time. The next higher need in the hierachy becomes the primary motivator and remains so even if never satisfied. As people experience self-actualization, they desire more rather than less of this need. Brings on a more holistic, humanistic, and positive approach.
    • A. 

      Positive organizational behaviour

    • B. 

      Maslow's needs hierachy theory

    • C. 

      Learned needs theory

    • D. 

      Employee engagement

    • E. 

      Four-drive theory

  • 6. 
    A perspective that focuses on building positive qualities and traits within individulals or institutions as opposed to focusing on what is wrong with them.
    • A. 

      Positive organizational behaviour

    • B. 

      Learned needs theory

    • C. 

      Four-drive theory

    • D. 

      Maslow's needs hierachy theory

    • E. 

      Goal setting

  • 7. 
    Needs can be strengthened through reinforcement, learning, and social conditions. Consists of three needs: achievement, power, and affiliation.
    • A. 

      Expectancy theory

    • B. 

      ERG theory

    • C. 

      Learned needs theory

    • D. 

      Four-drive theory

    • E. 

      Positive organizational behaviour

  • 8. 
    A needs heirachy consisting of three fundamental needs - existence, relatedness, and growth.
    • A. 

      Equity theory

    • B. 

      Four-drive theory

    • C. 

      Maslow's need hiearchy theory

    • D. 

      Positive organizational behaviour

    • E. 

      ERG theory

  • 9. 
    People with a strong need for this want to accomplish reasonably challenging goals through their own effort.
    • A. 

      Need for power

    • B. 

      Expectancy theory

    • C. 

      ERG theory

    • D. 

      Need for achievement

    • E. 

      Need for affiliation

  • 10. 
    A desire to seek approval from others, conform to their wishes and expectations, and avoid conflict and confrontation. People in decision-making positions must have a relatively low need for this.
    • A. 

      Need for affiliation

    • B. 

      Need for power

    • C. 

      Equity theory

    • D. 

      Goal setting

    • E. 

      Need for achievement

  • 11. 
    People with this want to exercise control over others. People who wear their power as a symbol have personalized power, and people with socialized desire power as a means to help others.
    • A. 

      Four-drive theory

    • B. 

      Need for affiliation

    • C. 

      Need for power

    • D. 

      Positive organizational behavior

    • E. 

      Need for achievement

  • 12. 
    A motivation theory based on the innate drives to acquire, bond, learn, and defend that incorporates both emotions and rationality. Determines which emotions are tagged to incoming stimuli. Demands your attention and motivates you to act on this observation.
    • A. 

      ERG theory

    • B. 

      Distributive justice

    • C. 

      Expectancy theory

    • D. 

      Four-drive theory

    • E. 

      Sources of feedback

  • 13. 
    Based on the idea that work effort is directed towards behaviours that people believe will lead to desired outcomes.
    • A. 

      Expectancy theory

    • B. 

      Four-drived theory

    • C. 

      ERG theory

    • D. 

      Positive organizational behaviour

    • E. 

      Goal setting

  • 14. 
    Refers to the individual's perception that his or her effort will result in a particular level of performance. In some situations, employees may believe that they can unquestionably accomplish the task. In other situations they expect that even their highest level of effort will not resut in the desire performance level. In most cases, this falls somewhere between these two extremes. Can be increased by assuring employees they have the necessary competencies, match employees based on their abilities and communicating the tasks clearly required for the job, and by behaviour modelling.
    • A. 

      E-to-P Expectancy

    • B. 

      Employee engagement

    • C. 

      Outcome Valences

    • D. 

      P-to-O Expectancy

    • E. 

      Multisource 360-degree feedback

  • 15. 
    The pereived probability that a specific behaviour or peformance level will lead to particular outcomes. Employees may believe that accomplishing a particular task will definitely result in a particular outcome, or they may believe that this outcome will have no effect on successful performance. More often, this expectancy falls somewhere between these two extremes. Can be increased with more valued rewards to those with higher job performance, by explaining how specific rewards are connected to past performances, and by measuring employee performance accurately.
    • A. 

      Characteristics of effective feedback

    • B. 

      P-to-O Expectancy

    • C. 

      E-to-P Expectancy

    • D. 

      Outcome Valences

    • E. 

      Goal setting

  • 16. 
    The anticipated satisfaction or dissatisfaction that an individual feels toward an outcome. It ranges from negative to positive. This represents a person's anticipated satisfaction with the outcome. Outcomes are positive when they are consistent wth our values and inhibit need fulfillment. Can be inceased by individualizing rewards. Leaders should watch out for negative consquences that reduce rather than enhance employee motivation.
    • A. 

      P-to-O Expectancy

    • B. 

      Outcome Valences

    • C. 

      Procedural justice

    • D. 

      E-to-P Expectancy

    • E. 

      Equity sensitivity

  • 17. 
    The process of motivating employees and clarifying their role perceptions by establishing performance objectives. Categories include specific, relevant, challenging, commitment, participation in formation, and feedback.
    • A. 

      Mutlisource 360-degree feedback

    • B. 

      Characteristics of effective feedback

    • C. 

      Goal setting

    • D. 

      Expectancy theory

    • E. 

      Equity theory

  • 18. 
    Should be specific and relevant, meaning the information should include specific metrics. Must relate to the individual's behaviour. Should also be timely, meaning the information should be available soon after the behaviour or results occurs so employees see a clear associaton between their actions and the consequences. Should be sufficiently frequent. One consideration is the employee's knowledge and experience with the task. Should have trustworthy and credible sources for the employees.
    • A. 

      Multisource 360-degree feedback

    • B. 

      Goal setting

    • C. 

      Evaluating goal setting and feedback

    • D. 

      Characteristics of effective feedback

    • E. 

      Distributive justice

  • 19. 
    Information about an employee's performance collected from a full circle of people, including subordinates, peers, supervisors, and customers. Tends to provide more complete and accurate information and also creates challenges.
    • A. 

      Multi-source 360-degree feedback

    • B. 

      Evaluating goal setting and feedback

    • C. 

      Characteristics of effective feedback

    • D. 

      Goal setting

    • E. 

      Inequity and employee motivation

  • 20. 
    Goal setting is identified as one of the top organizational behaviour theories terms of validity and usefulness. One concern with it, however, is that it tends to focus employees on a narrow subset of measurable performance indicators while ignoring aspects of job performance that are difficult to measure. Many employees are motivated to make their objectives easy. Seems to interefere with the learning process in new, complex jobs.
    • A. 

      Characteristics of effective feedbak

    • B. 

      Positive organizational behaviour

    • C. 

      Multisource 360-degree feedback

    • D. 

      Evaluating goal setting and feedback

    • E. 

      Goal setting

  • 21. 
    Employees put more effort into a task when they work toward specific goals rather than do your best targets. These types of goals have measurable levels of change over a certain and relatively short timeframe, such as: witin six months, reduce average call pick-up time from 35 to 25 seconds.
    • A. 

      Specific goals

    • B. 

      Challenging goals

    • C. 

      Goal commitment

    • D. 

      Relevant goals

    • E. 

      Goal participation

  • 22. 
    Goals must be connected to the individual's job and within his or her control. For example, a goal to reduce waste materials would have little value if employees don't have much contol over waste in the production process.
    • A. 

      Goal participation

    • B. 

      Challenging goals

    • C. 

      Goal commitment

    • D. 

      Relevant goals

    • E. 

      Specific goals

  • 23. 
    Causes people to raise the intensity and persistence of their work effort and think through information more actively. They also fulfill a person's achievement or growth needs when the goal is achieved.
    • A. 

      Challenging goals

    • B. 

      Goal feedback

    • C. 

      Specific goals

    • D. 

      Goal participation

    • E. 

      Goal commitment

  • 24. 
    Ideally goals should be challenging without being so difficult that employees lose their motivation to achieve them. The lower the expectancy that the goal an be accomplished, the less motivated the employee is to the goal.
    • A. 

      Goal participation

    • B. 

      Goal commitment

    • C. 

      Challenging goals

    • D. 

      Specific goals

    • E. 

      Relevant goals

  • 25. 
    Goal setting is usually but not always effective when employees join in setting goals. Potentially increases goal commitment compared to goals set along by the supervisor. May also improve the goal quality, because employees have valuable information and knowledge that may not be known to those who initally formed the goal.
    • A. 

      Relevant goals

    • B. 

      Goal commitment

    • C. 

      Goal feedback

    • D. 

      Specific goals

    • E. 

      Goal participation

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