Organizational Behaviour Chapter 3

32 Questions | Total Attempts: 505

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Organizational Behaviour Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The process of receiving information about and making of the world around us. It entails deciding which information to notice, how to categorize this information, and how to interpret it within the framework of our existing knowledge.
    • A. 

      Perception

    • B. 

      Categorical thinking

    • C. 

      Confirmation bias

    • D. 

      Self-serving bias

    • E. 

      Selective attention

  • 2. 
    The process of attending to some information received by our senses and ignoring other information. Influenced by characteristics of the object being perceived, particularly its size, intensity, motion, repetition, and novelty. Characteristics of the perceiver play an important role. Emotional markers - worry, happiness, boredom - help us to store information.
    • A. 

      Differentiation

    • B. 

      Selective attention

    • C. 

      Homegenization

    • D. 

      Confirmation bias

    • E. 

      Categorical thinking

  • 3. 
    Screens out information that is contrary to our values and assumptions. We have the tendency to seek out information that supports our self-concept.
    • A. 

      Mental models

    • B. 

      Categorical thinking

    • C. 

      Confirmation bias

    • D. 

      Selective attention

    • E. 

      Perception

  • 4. 
    The mostly unconscious process of organizing people and objects. Things are often grouped together based on their similarity or proximity. Others of perceptual grouping include the need for congitive closure, trends in otherwise ambiguous information, and interpreting incoming information. Emotional markers are tagged to incoming stimuli, which are essentially quick judgment about whether that information is good or bad for us.
    • A. 

      Homegenization

    • B. 

      Perception

    • C. 

      Mental models

    • D. 

      Attribution process

    • E. 

      Categorical thinking

  • 5. 
    Visual or relational images in our mind representing the external world. Fills in the missing pieces. We need to ask ourselves about the assumptions we make.
    • A. 

      Attribution process

    • B. 

      Categorization

    • C. 

      Perception

    • D. 

      Mental models

    • E. 

      Selective attention

  • 6. 
    Social identity is a comparitive process, and that comparison begins by categorizing people into distinct groups.
    • A. 

      Categorization

    • B. 

      Categorical thinking

    • C. 

      Differentiation

    • D. 

      Homogenization

    • E. 

      Stereotyping

  • 7. 
    We tend to think people within each group are very similar to each other, like thinking Albertans all have similar attitudes and characteristics and Nova Scotians have their own set of characteristics.
    • A. 

      Self-serving bias

    • B. 

      Categorization

    • C. 

      Homogenization

    • D. 

      Attribution process

    • E. 

      Differentiation

  • 8. 
    Assigning more favorable characteristics to people in our groups than to people in other groups.
    • A. 

      Homeogenization

    • B. 

      Categorization

    • C. 

      Mental models

    • D. 

      Differentiation

    • E. 

      Categorical thinking

  • 9. 
    The process of assigning traits to people based on their membership in a social category. We assign people to one or more social categories based on easily observable information about them. A form of categorical thinking and a process to simplify our understanding of the world. They do not accurately describe every person in that social category. It is difficult to prevent the activation of this, but we can minimize the application of this type of information.
    • A. 

      Stereotyping

    • B. 

      Fundamental attribution error

    • C. 

      Categorization

    • D. 

      Attribution process

    • E. 

      Self-serving bias

  • 10. 
    The perceptual process of deciding whether an observed behaviour or event is caused largely by internal (the person) or external (the environment) factors. Internal factors include the person's ability or motivation, whereas external factors include lack of resources, other people, or just luck. People rely on consistency, distinctiveness, and consensus to determine someone's behaviour.
    • A. 

      Fundamental attribution error

    • B. 

      Stereotyping

    • C. 

      Self-serving bias

    • D. 

      Attribution process

    • E. 

      Halo effect

  • 11. 
    The tendency to see the person rather than the situation as the main cause of that person's behaviour. Occurs because observers can't easily see the external factors that constrain the person's behaviour.
    • A. 

      Primacy effect

    • B. 

      Self-serving bias

    • C. 

      Fundamental attribution error

    • D. 

      Stereotyping

    • E. 

      Mental models

  • 12. 
    The tendency to attribute favourable outcomes to internal factors and our failures to external factors.
    • A. 

      False-consensus effect

    • B. 

      Attribution process

    • C. 

      Self-fulfilling prophecy

    • D. 

      Self-serving bias

    • E. 

      Fundamental attribution error

  • 13. 
    Occurs when our expectations about another person cause that person to act in a way that is consistent with those expectations. High-expectancy employees learn more skills and knowledge than low-expectancy employees. Stronger at the beginning of the relationship, when several people hold the same perception of the individual and among people with a history of low achievement. Leaders need to develop and maintain a postive, yet realistic, expectation toward all employees.
    • A. 

      Attribution process

    • B. 

      Fundamental attribution error

    • C. 

      Self-fulfilling prophecy

    • D. 

      Halo effect

    • E. 

      Self-serving bias

  • 14. 
    Our general impression of a person, usually based on one prominent characteristic.
    • A. 

      Recency effect

    • B. 

      Self-fulfilling prophecy

    • C. 

      Primacy effect

    • D. 

      Halo effect

    • E. 

      False-consensus effect

  • 15. 
    When we quickly form an opinion of people based on the first information we receive about them.
    • A. 

      Primacy effect

    • B. 

      Halo effect

    • C. 

      Self-fulfilling prophecy

    • D. 

      Recency effect

    • E. 

      False-consensus effect

  • 16. 
    When we use the most up-to-date information which dominates our perceptions.
    • A. 

      Recency effect

    • B. 

      Primacy effect

    • C. 

      False-consensus effect

    • D. 

      Halo effect

    • E. 

      Self-serving bias

  • 17. 
    When we overestimate the extent to which others have beliefs and characteristics similar to our own.
    • A. 

      Stereotyping

    • B. 

      Recency effect

    • C. 

      Halo effect

    • D. 

      False-consensus effect

    • E. 

      Primacy effect

  • 18. 
    A model of mutual understanding that encourages disclosure and feedback to increase our own open area and reduce the blind, hidden, and unknown areas.
    • A. 

      Meaningful interaction

    • B. 

      Johari Window

    • C. 

      Tacit knowledge

    • D. 

      Behaviour modification

    • E. 

      Positive reinforcement

  • 19. 
    Self-awareness and mutual understanding can be improved through this. Based on the contact hypothesis, which states that under certain conditions, people who interact with each other will be less prejudiced or biased against each other. Working toward a shared goal, and everyone should have equal status.
    • A. 

      Meaningful interaction

    • B. 

      Positive reinforcement

    • C. 

      Behaviour modification

    • D. 

      False-consensus effect

    • E. 

      Learning

  • 20. 
    A relatively permanent change in behaviour that occurs as a result of a person's interaction with the environment.
    • A. 

      Explicit knowledge

    • B. 

      Behaviour modification

    • C. 

      Learning

    • D. 

      Tacit knowledge

    • E. 

      Johari Window

  • 21. 
    Embedded in our actions and ways of thinking, and transmitted only through observation and experience.
    • A. 

      Learning

    • B. 

      Behaviour modification

    • C. 

      Explicit knowledge

    • D. 

      Tacit knowledge

    • E. 

      Meaningful interaction

  • 22. 
    What we learn from things like reading in a book, but only the tip of the iceberg.
    • A. 

      Meaningful interaction

    • B. 

      Explicit knowledge

    • C. 

      Tacit knowledge

    • D. 

      Learning

    • E. 

      Behaviour modification

  • 23. 
    A theory that explains learning in terms of the antecedents and consequences of behaviour. Believes that learning is completely dependent on the environment. Views human thoughts as unimportant intermediate stages between behaviour and the environment. The environment teaches us to alter our behaviours so that we maximize positive consequences and minimize adverse consequences.
    • A. 

      Positive reinforcement

    • B. 

      Learning

    • C. 

      Johari Window

    • D. 

      Behaviour modification

    • E. 

      Halo effect

  • 24. 
    Occurs when the introduction of a consequence increases or maintains the frequency or future probability of a specific behaviour.
    • A. 

      Positive reinforcement

    • B. 

      Negative reinforcement

    • C. 

      Extinction

    • D. 

      Behaviour modification

    • E. 

      Punishment

  • 25. 
    Occurs when a consequence decreases the frequency or future probability of a behaviour.
    • A. 

      Extinction

    • B. 

      Meaningful interaction

    • C. 

      Positive reinforcement

    • D. 

      Punishment

    • E. 

      Negative reinforcement

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