Introductory Physical Science (Period Length) The Final Exam

50 Questions | Total Attempts: 45

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Introductory Physical Science  (Period Length)   The Final Exam

Test taking strategy advice!1. Read all questions carefully and try to eliminate choices that are obviously wrong. 2. Use a scrap paper to interact with the test – make notes, show your work, make your presence known and give yourself something to come back and double-check if you have time at the end. 3. If stuck on a question, skip it for now and come back later (answer each Q eventually). 4. Always ask for clarification from the teacher if something is unclear to you. Don’t be shy! 5. Take your time and do your best. You’ll never regret doing the best that you can.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    One class’s data for the observed change in mass in Experiment 2.5, The Mass of Copper and Sulfur, is shown in the histogram below.  
  • 2. 
  • 3. 
    A group of 100 identical marbles having a total mass of 125 g are poured into a graduated cylinder and found to come up to the 100-cm3 mark.  When the marbles are added to 75 cm3 of water in a second graduated cylinder, the water level rises to the 137- cm3 mark.
  • 4. 
    What does mass measure?  
    • A. 

      How much matter you have.

    • B. 

      How much space the matter you have takes up.

    • C. 

      How dense the matter you have is.

    • D. 

      The point at which a sample of matter changes from a solid to a liquid.

    • E. 

      The strength with which gravity pulls on a piece of matter.

  • 5. 
    What does volume measure?
    • A. 

      How much matter you have.

    • B. 

      How much space the matter you have takes up.

    • C. 

      How dense the matter you have is.

    • D. 

      The point at which a sample of matter changes from a solid to a liquid.

    • E. 

      The strength with which gravity pulls on a a piece of matter.

  • 6. 
    What does weight measure?
    • A. 

      How much matter you have.

    • B. 

      How much space the matter you have takes up.

    • C. 

      How dense the matter you have is.

    • D. 

      The point at which a sample of matter changes from a solid to a liquid.

    • E. 

      The strength with which gravity pulls on a piece of matter.

  • 7. 
    What are the units for mass?  
    • A. 

      Cubic centimeters or milliliters (they are equivalent)

    • B. 

      Grams or kilograms

    • C. 

      Grams per cubic centimeters

    • D. 

      Degrees Celsius

    • E. 

      Degrees Fahrenheit

  • 8. 
    What are the units for volume?
    • A. 

      Cubic centimeters or milliliters (they are equivalent)

    • B. 

      Grams or kilograms

    • C. 

      Grams per cubic centimeter (or grams per milliliter)

    • D. 

      Degrees Celsius

    • E. 

      Degrees Fahrenheit

  • 9. 
    What are the units for density?  
    • A. 

      Cubic centimeters or milliliters (they are equivalent)

    • B. 

      Grams or kilograms

    • C. 

      Grams per cubic centimeter

    • D. 

      Degrees Celsius

    • E. 

      Degrees Fahrenheit

  • 10. 
    You measure a block, and find that its length is 2 cm, its width is 3 cm, and its height is 4 cm.  what is its volume in ?
    • A. 

      4

    • B. 

      9

    • C. 

      12

    • D. 

      24

    • E. 

      48

  • 11. 
    We spent a lot of time studying The Law of Conservation of Mass.  Which of the following statements about the law is FALSE?
    • A. 

      You can do whatever you want to matter (melt it, boil it, explode it, dissolve it), but as long as it happens in a closed container, the total mass will not change.

    • B. 

      This law was discovered by scientists hundreds of years ago; it helped them to develop the idea that all matter is made of little particles called atoms.

    • C. 

      When you eat, you get bigger and gain mass--this clearly violates (goes against) the law.

    • D. 

      There is a very similar law about energy--The Law of Conservation of Energy.

    • E. 

      The law ONLY holds true in closed systems, so nothing can escape or get in.

  • 12. 
    Why is there NOT  a Law of Conservation of Volume?  
    • A. 

      If you pour 50 mL of one liquid into 50 mL of another liquid, they may not add up to 100 mL.

    • B. 

      If you heat up a gas, it becomes less dense, meaning it takes up more space and rises (this is how hot air balloons work).

    • C. 

      If you cool down a solid, it takes up less space and becomes more dense (this is part of why doors don't stick as much in the winter as they do in the summer).

    • D. 

      Volume just tells you how much space something takes up, not how much of it there is.

    • E. 

      All of the above.

  • 13. 
     Which of the following statements about measurements is false?
    • A. 

      Every measurement has some limit to its accuracy – for example, our balances can only estimate to the closest 0.01 g, and with rulers few students take the time or care to estimate beyond the nearest millimeter.

    • B. 

      A measurement of ‘0’ can be important, and worth recording – for example, if there is no radioactivity present in a basement, that is worth knowing!

    • C. 

      Since no single measurement is likely to be perfectly accurate, we often try to get multiple measurements in science, and look to see if they all ‘agree’.

    • D. 

      It is usually OK to not include the units with your measurements; the reader should be smart enough to figure out what they are.

    • E. 

      Each measurement should have a label, explaining what it is a measurement of.

  • 14. 
    In which column of the histogram would an apparent loss of 0.2g appear?
    • A. 

      I

    • B. 

      II

    • C. 

      III

    • D. 

      IV

    • E. 

      V

  • 15. 
    In which column of the histogram would an apparent increase of 0.3 g appear? 
    • A. 

      I

    • B. 

      II

    • C. 

      III

    • D. 

      IV

    • E. 

      V

  • 16. 
    Assuming that the students who did this lab worked with the same materials and care that you did, what would the best conclusion to draw from this histogram?
    • A. 

      When copper and sulfur react, sometimes there is a slight gain in mass, but more often there is a slight decrease in mass.

    • B. 

      When copper and sulfur react, the outcome (in terms of change in mass) is unpredictable.

    • C. 

      On average, when copper and sulfur react, there is a slight decrease in mass.

    • D. 

      When copper and sulfur react, the most common result is no change in mass; small lab errors are probably to blame for any apparent changes in mass.

    • E. 

      No conclusion can be drawn since the data are inconclusive.

  • 17. 
    What is the “label” (as opposed to the units) on the x axis in this graph?
    • A. 

      Change in Mass

    • B. 

      G

    • C. 

      Number of Cases

    • D. 

      -0.5, -0.3, -0.1 etc.

    • E. 

      0, 2, 4, 6 etc. 

    • F. 

      0, 2, 4, 6 etc. 

  • 18. 
    Which statement about characteristic properties of substances is false?
    • A. 

      They help us to identify substances.

    • B. 

      They hold true regardless of how much of a substance you have.

    • C. 

      They sometimes depend on environmental conditions, such as temperature or air pressure.

    • D. 

      They should be the same for a pure substance on any other planet in the universe, if you take into account things like temperature or air pressure.

    • E. 

      They depend on the shape which the substance is in (for example, the gold in a gold ring will have different properties than the gold in a gold statue).

  • 19. 
    Which of the following is not a characteristic property of a substance?
    • A. 

      Mass

    • B. 

      Boiling point

    • C. 

      Density

    • D. 

      Solubility

    • E. 

      Radioactivity

  • 20. 
    A student carefully recorded the following measurements for three solid blocks:BlockMass (g)Volume (cm3)125152403232520 Which blocks could be made of the same material?
    • A. 

      1 and 2 only

    • B. 

      1 and 3 only

    • C. 

      2 and 3 only

    • D. 

      All of the blocks

    • E. 

      None of the blocks

  • 21. 
    Following the rules of ‘significant figures’, the density of an object which has a mass of 24.86 g and a volume of 6.3 cm3 is best expressed (in g/ cm3) as…
    • A. 

      3.94603

    • B. 

      3.946

    • C. 

      3.95

    • D. 

      3.9

    • E. 

      4

  • 22. 
    When we measured the thickness of a piece of aluminum foil, we found it to be about 0.0017cm.  What would this number be in scientific notation?
    • A. 

      17 x

    • B. 

      17 x

    • C. 

      1.7 x 

    • D. 

      1.7 x

  • 23. 
    Which of these about solubility is FALSE?  
    • A. 

      It is a measurement of how much of one substance can dissolve into another substance.

    • B. 

      The substance that dissolves into the other substance is called the solute. Salt, sugar, baking soda, and even oxygen are examples of solutes.

    • C. 

      The substance that the solute dissolves into is called the solvent. Water is a very common and effective solvent.

    • D. 

      To avoid confusion with density, the units for solubility are g/100cm3 (how many grams of substance can dissolve into 100 cm3 of water).

    • E. 

      The solubility of a substance is always the same regardless of temperature.

  • 24. 
    Which of these about solubility is FALSE?
    • A. 

      Limestone is soluble in the weak carbonic acid that forms when rain falls through carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, this helps form caves and sinkholes.

    • B. 

      The solubility of gases (such as oxygen) goes up when the temperature goes up, this is part of why large fish are found in hot water.

    • C. 

      If you try to dissolve more of a substance in water than it can dissolve, the extra undissolved substance will pile up on the bottom as what we call a ‘precipitate’.

    • D. 

      If you shake things, they will dissolve faster – this is why dishwashers and washing machines use motion as part of their operating cycle.

    • E. 

      Acid is made by dissolving substances such as hydrogen chloride in water; the more hydrogen chloride dissolved in, the stronger the acid.

  • 25. 
    Based on the graph below, what would happen if you tried to dissolve 300 g of sugar into 100cm3 of water around room temperature (20 degrees C)?
    • A. 

      It would all dissolve, but just barely.

    • B. 

      It would all dissolve, with plenty of ‘room’ for more.

    • C. 

      None of it would dissolve.

    • D. 

      Only about half of it would dissolve.

    • E. 

      Some of it would dissolve, but about 100 would not.

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