Cls - Lesson 1: Performing Tactical Combat Casualty care

14 Questions | Total Attempts: 559

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Lesson Quizzes & Trivia

AR CLS lesson 1 for performing tactical combat casualty care.  Given a written situation concerning a casualty under combat conditions and possible responses.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Of the deaths that occur during ground combat, about what percent die before reaching a medical treatment facility (MTF)?
    • A. 

      10%

    • B. 

      50%

    • C. 

      75%

    • D. 

      90%

  • 2. 
    Your unit is in ground combat.  You see a soldier fall as though he has been shot.  Your primary duty is to:
    • A. 

      Continue firing at the enemy.

    • B. 

      Stop firing and go to the fallen soldier.

  • 3. 
    Of the following types of deaths occurring during ground combat and before reaching a medical treatment facility, select the type of preventable death from which more soldiers died.
    • A. 

      Tension pneumothorax.

    • B. 

      Blocked airway.

    • C. 

      Bleeding from wounds to the extremities.

    • D. 

      Heart attack.

  • 4. 
    When performing care under fire, which of the following can be rendered before moving the casualty?
    • A. 

      Perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

    • B. 

      Apply a tourniquet to control bleeding.

    • C. 

      Perform needle chest decompression to relieve tension pneumothorax.

    • D. 

      Administer the combat pill pack to control pain and infection.

  • 5. 
    You and a casualty are under fire. The casualty is conscious and able to fire his weapon. What should you tell him to do?
    • A. 

      Return fire.

    • B. 

      Radio for help.

    • C. 

      Perform self-aid.

    • D. 

      Shoot randomly in the air to confuse the enemy.

  • 6. 
    You and a casualty are under fire. The casualty has a severe wound to the arm. You can administer treatment without endangering the mission or yourself. What treatment should you administer?
    • A. 

      Black magic.

    • B. 

      Tourniquet.

    • C. 

      Saline lock.

    • D. 

      IV.

  • 7. 
    You have been wounded and are still under enemy fire. You are unable to return fire and there is no safe cover nearby. What should you do?
  • 8. 
    You can move a casualty out of enemy fire. Should you try to retrieve his weapon also?
    • A. 

      No.

    • B. 

      Yes.

  • 9. 
    A nasopharyngeal air is inserted to maintain the casualty's airway as part of:
    • A. 

      Care under fire.

    • B. 

      Tactical field care.

    • C. 

      Both care under fire and tactical field care.

  • 10. 
    What is in the combat pill pack that you and other soldiers carry in combat?
    • A. 

      Tylenol.

    • B. 

      800m Motrin.

    • C. 

      Chewing gum.

    • D. 

      Pain medication and antibiotics.

  • 11. 
    A casualty has a significant wound to his leg. The casualty is coherent and has a palpable radial pulse. The wound has been dressed and the bleeding is controlled. What should you do now?
    • A. 

      Initiate a saline lock.

    • B. 

      Nothing, unless the casualty looses consciousness.

    • C. 

      Initiate a saline lock and begin administering intravenous fluids.

  • 12. 
    Why must a penetrating chest wound be sealed?
    • A. 

      To keep air from entering through the wound.

    • B. 

      To keep air from escaping through the wound.

    • C. 

      To control bleeding.

  • 13. 
    You are going to administer a combat pill pack to a casualty. You should administer:
    • A. 

      The casualty's pack.

    • B. 

      Your personal pack.

    • C. 

      A pack from your aid bag.

  • 14. 
    You are accompanying an unconscious casualty during evacuation. The casualty has an IV. What should you do?
    • A. 

      Monitor the casualty's breathing.

    • B. 

      Monitor bleeding from the casualty's wounds.

    • C. 

      Monitor the casualty's IV.

    • D. 

      All of the above.