Greece Rise Of The City-state - Athens

10 Questions | Total Attempts: 113

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Greece Rise Of The City-state - Athens

Use questions in this quiz to prep for your Unit Lesson quiz on Greece The Rise of the City-State-Athens.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    What were the cities and the areas around them called in ancient Greece?
    • A. 

      Dwellings.

    • B. 

      Provinces.

    • C. 

      City-States.

    • D. 

      Townships.

  • 2. 
    Why did people move throughout Greece and off of the mainland after the end of the Dark Ages?
    • A. 

      Towns quickly grew too big to feed everybody.

    • B. 

      Because the grass was greener on the other side of the street.

    • C. 

      Towns around Greece erupted in violence.

    • D. 

      Religious disputes forced many to move.

  • 3. 
    Why didn't the original Greek monarchies survive?
    • A. 

      A devastating plague hit many royal families.

    • B. 

      Early kings were not well educated.

    • C. 

      The nobles who often did much of the work demanded a share of the power.

    • D. 

      Nobles held secret councils to remove the kings.

  • 4. 
    What was the advantage of being ruled by a tyrant?
    • A. 

      Tyrants kept their promises.

    • B. 

      Citizens could withdraw their support and remove a tyrant.

    • C. 

      Tyrants were considered to be kinder than kings.

    • D. 

      A tyrant came to power with support of the people.

  • 5. 
    Who was considered a citizen of Athens?
    • A. 

      Anyone who was registered to vote.

    • B. 

      Only adult males born in the area.

    • C. 

      All who lived within the city limits.

    • D. 

      Anyone who had graduated from an Athenian school.

  • 6. 
    Was participation in government in Athens an example of "majority rule?" Why or why not?
    • A. 

      No. Only the votes of adults were counted.

    • B. 

      No. Only a small minority of the population was allowed to participate.

    • C. 

      Yes. Everyone was welcome to vote and the largest number of votes won.

    • D. 

      Yes. All but foreigners could participate and they were only a small part of the population.

  • 7. 
    In what ways was a trial in ancient Athens different from a trial today?
    • A. 

      There were no judges or lawyers.

    • B. 

      Someone found guilty of a crime could pay a slave to serve their sentence.

    • C. 

      Jurors held up a red rope to indicate when they had a question.

    • D. 

      There were hundreds of jurors.

  • 8. 
    From the Greek demos kratia, what is the definition of "democracy?"
    • A. 

      "Everyday people."

    • B. 

      "Meet me at the Agora."

    • C. 

      "One man, one vote."

    • D. 

      "Rule by the people."

  • 9. 
    Think about the ancient Greek's long road to democracy and which of the following responses correctly orders the forms of government from the one that came first to that which came last.
    • A. 

      Democracy, Tyranny, Monarchy, Oligarchy

    • B. 

      Monarchy, Oligarchy, Democracy, Tyranny

    • C. 

      Monarchy, Oligarchy, Tyranny, Democracy

    • D. 

      Tyranny, Monarchy, Oligarchy, Democracy

  • 10. 
    What made the Agora important in ancient Athens?
    • A. 

      It was where citizens met to discuss important issues.

    • B. 

      It was where all voting took place.

    • C. 

      It was where trials were held.

    • D. 

      It was where families went to do their shopping.