Foundations In Ed Chapter 4

29 Questions | Total Attempts: 867

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Foundations In Ed Chapter 4

Foundations In Ed


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    A state establishes “standards” that students must meet in order to graduate. The state is most  likely focusing on which broad educational goal?
    • A. 

      . transmitting society’s knowledge and values

    • B. 

      . reconstructing society

    • C. 

      Developing individual talent and self-expression

    • D. 

      Developing strong self-esteem

  • 2. 
    A colleague wants to learn more about economic reconstructionism. Which of the following        would you recommend he or she read?
    • A. 

      . any of Milton Friedman’s early works

    • B. 

      . the U.S. Department of Education’s A Nation at Risk

    • C. 

      Paulo Freire’s The Pedagogy of the Oppressed

    • D. 

      The Supreme Court case Lemon v. Kurtzman

  • 3. 
    .  Economic reconstructionists believe that
    • A. 

      Service learning can change society’s problems.

    • B. 

      Companies need to invest more money in schools.

    • C. 

      Schools are tools of oppression

    • D. 

      None of the choices.

  • 4. 
    Who was John Goodlad?
    • A. 

      The author of A Place Called School, a study examining the purposes of schooling

    • B. 

      . the director of the National Assessment of Educational Progress

    • C. 

      The founder of Tesseract, which contracts with schools to provide essential services

    • D. 

      An educational historian who suggested schools have too much responsibility

  • 5. 
    All of the following are goal areas in John Goodlad’s definition of the purpose of school EXCEPT to
    • A. 

      Nurture intellectual skills.

    • B. 

      Participate in a democratic society.

    • C. 

      Develop individual talents.

    • D. 

      Become more accepting of individual differences.

  • 6. 
    When students, parents, and teachers were asked to rate school goals in a study
    • A. 

      The vast majority rated social and civic goals most important.

    • B. 

      Students and parents rated personal goals highest; teachers rated academic goals highest.

    • C. 

      Vocational, personal, academic, and social and civic goals were all rated “very important.”

    • D. 

      Students overwhelmingly favored vocational goals above all others.

  • 7. 
    Someone in favor of a social action curriculum would rate which of the following goals for schools HIGHEST?
    • A. 

      To prepare workers to compete successfully in a technological world economy

    • B. 

      To transmit the nation’s cultural heritage, preserving past accomplishments and insights

    • C. 

      To educate students in avoiding social pitfalls: unwanted pregnancy, AIDS, drugs, and alcoholism

    • D. 

      To encourage students to question and reform current practices and institutions

  • 8. 
    Educators such as Arthur Bestor and Ernest Boyer have concluded that
    • A. 

      U.S. schools have taken responsibility for too few policies and goals.

    • B. 

      U.S. schools have taken responsibility for too many policies and goals.

    • C. 

      Academic and vocational goals are more important than individual and social goals

    • D. 

      The goals students and parents hold for schools differ sharply from educators’ goals for schools.

  • 9. 
    Which of the following was the influential report that focused the nation’s attention on the need for education reform, and set in motion the first of three waves of reform that have been buffeting American schools since the 1980s?
    • A. 

      A Place Called School

    • B. 

      A Nation at Risk

    • C. 

      The Great School Debate: Choice, Vouchers, and Charters

    • D. 

      The Pedagogy of the Oppressed

  • 10. 
    .  The scathing 1983 report released by the National Commission on Excellence in Education criticized schools for their
    • A. 

      “cafeteria-style” curriculum and declining test scores.

    • B. 

      Failure to tend to children’s health and well-being

    • C. 

      Superficial curriculum covering too many topics in too little depth.

    • D. 

      Poor performance in achieving educational equity for girls and students of color.

  • 11. 
    .  Immediately after the release of A Nation at Risk, most school reformers focused on
    • A. 

      Requiring graduate-level study for teacher preparation.

    • B. 

      Restructuring the high school curriculum to better reflect student interests and concerns.

    • C. 

      Steering more resources toward special-education students and racial and ethnic minorities.

    • D. 

      Reducing electives and increasing courses required for graduation from high school.

  • 12. 
    In a second wave of school reform, educators such as Theodore Sizer, John Goodlad, and Ernest Boyer called for such things as
    • A. 

      Changing practices at the school level and empowering teachers and principals

    • B. 

      Strengthening central offices and strictly regulating schools.

    • C. 

      Having schools provide a wide variety of health and social services.

    • D. 

      Increasing the length of the school day and school year.

  • 13. 
    An examination of the history of school reform movements in the U.S. reveals
    • A. 

      Little change in the basic goals for school over time.

    • B. 

      A consistent emphasis on raising standards and improving academic performance.

    • C. 

      .a consistent emphasis on meeting the needs of diverse learners and raising self-esteem.

    • D. 

      That school goals tend to change to reflect the nation’s ever-changing priorities.

  • 14. 
    The neighborhood public school is
    • A. 

      Stronger than ever as a result of spectacular gains on standardized tests and the focus on greater accountability.

    • B. 

      In competition with magnet schools, charter schools, and even for-profit schools.

    • C. 

      Criticized by Jonathan Kozol, who believes we’ve given neighborhood schools every chance to perform.

    • D. 

      Threatened most by a rise in home schooling

  • 15. 
    Open enrollment is the term given to
    • A. 

      Open enrollment is the term given to

    • B. 

      the use of public monies to send children to private schools.

    • C. 

      The constitutionally protected right of all students to enroll in public schools, without discrimination based on race, sex, religion, or handicapping condition.

    • D. 

      The elimination of the requirement that students attend the closest public school.

  • 16. 
    An early promoter of vouchers in education was
    • A. 

      Researcher John Goodlad.

    • B. 

      Writer Jonathan Kozol.

    • C. 

      Researcher James Coleman.

    • D. 

      Economist Milton Friedman.

  • 17. 
    Which of the following was begun as a tool to desegregate schools?
    • A. 

      Magnet schools

    • B. 

      Open enrollment

    • C. 

      Charter schools

    • D. 

      For-profit schools

  • 18. 
    Charter schools typically enjoy
    • A. 

      Total freedom from state regulations.

    • B. 

      Permission to operate for a fixed length of time

    • C. 

      The advantage of being able to administer admissions tests

    • D. 

      State-of-the-art facilities.

  • 19. 
    What principle do Educational Maintenance Organizations follow?
    • A. 

      Children should be home-schooled if they wish to excel in business.

    • B. 

      Voucher systems threaten to undermine the shared fabric of American life.

    • C. 

      Profits can be realized by investing in education.

    • D. 

      Schools should become one-stop shops for children’s services.

  • 20. 
    Edison Schools
    • A. 

      Are for-profit, charter schools with an uncertain future.

    • B. 

      Are true “virtual schools” delivering instruction over the Internet to clusters of home-schooled students.

    • C. 

      Quickly proved that profits can go hand-in-hand with raising test scores and improving teacher morale.

    • D. 

      Give teachers uncommon flexibility in their approach to teaching reading and math.

  • 21. 
    In Lemon v. Kurtzman, the Supreme Court established criteria to
    • A. 

      Limit the extent of privatization of schools.

    • B. 

      Determine the legality of government funds used in religious schools.

    • C. 

      Promote effective charter schools in urban areas.

    • D. 

      Regulate the explosive growth of home schooling.

  • 22. 
    Home-schooled students
    • A. 

      Score just below national averages on standardized tests.

    • B. 

      Have greater opportunities for socialization than their public school counterparts.

    • C. 

      Are often home-schooled for religious reasons.

    • D. 

      Have dwindled in number as parents have taken advantage of open enrollment, charter schools, and vouchers to bypass their neighborhood public schools.

  • 23. 
    Virtual schools
    • A. 

      . are a form of distance learning

    • B. 

      Create the illusion of attending a school, but these schools are not accredited.

    • C. 

      Are responsible for raising standards by extending the school day.

    • D. 

      Are responsible for raising standards by extending the school day.

  • 24. 
    Which of the following characteristics is usually associated with effective schools research?
    • A. 

      Principals are focused on research and funding

    • B. 

      School leaders and teachers do not hold unrealistically high expectations for students

    • C. 

      . Midterm and final exams provide the only necessary checks on student performance so that teaching can be adjusted accordingly

    • D. 

      School goals are enunciated by the principal and followed by teachers and students

  • 25. 
    Research on effective school leaders suggests that such leaders
    • A. 

      . promote multiple school missions.

    • B. 

      Spend most of their time meeting with parents.

    • C. 

      Require teachers to do after-school tutoring.

    • D. 

      Create a safe and positive school climate.

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