EDF 1005 : Quiz On Introduction To Education! Trivia Knowledge Test

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EDF 1005 : Quiz On Introduction To Education! Trivia Knowledge Test

This is an EDF 1005 : Quiz On Introduction To Education! Educations is only possible if there’s continuity and a guided system that ensures there’s a formal presentation of education from one generation to another and this is where procedural introductions are crucial. Take this exciting quiz and get to see if you are as knowledgeable as you think about some historic moments.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The first permanent English settlement in America was a trading post founded __________
    • A. 

      In 1620 at Plymouth Rock, in Plymouth Massachussetts

    • B. 

      In 1607 at Jamestown in the Old Dominion of Virginia.

    • C. 

      In 1692 in New England, centered around the present-day cities of Salem and Boston.

    • D. 

      In 1664 when James, the Duke of York, received control of New Netherland. The name of the colony was changed to New York in honor of the Duke.

  • 2. 
    Two colonies, _______ and ________, were founded by chartered companies whose funds, provided by investors, were used to equip, transport, and maintain the colonists.
    • A. 

      Georgia; South Carolina

    • B. 

      Carolina; Maryland

    • C. 

      Connecticut; New Jersey

    • D. 

      Virginia; Massachusetts

  • 3. 
    Charles I of England granted to Cecil Calvert (Lord Baltimore) and his heirs approximately 2,800,000 hectares that were later to become the state of __________
    • A. 

      Virginia

    • B. 

      Massachusetts

    • C. 

      Maryland

    • D. 

      Georgia

  • 4. 
    The colonies were self-sufficient communities with their own outlets to the sea. Each colony became a separate entity, marked by a strong individuality. But despite this individualism, problems of commerce, navigation, manufacturing, and currency cut across colonial boundaries and necessitated common regulations which, after independence from England was won, led to the federation.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 5. 
    In the case of the colony of _____________, well-to-do emigrants themselves financed the transport and equipment of their families and servants to their new home in America.
    • A. 

      New Hampshre

    • B. 

      Maine

    • C. 

      Maryland

    • D. 

      New Jersey

    • E. 

      Connecticut

  • 6. 
    Which of the following is not a predominant reason for European emigrants to leave their homeland for  America.
    • A. 

      Greater economic opportunity

    • B. 

      Religious freedom

    • C. 

      Fleeing from political oppression

    • D. 

      Protect the interests of the monarchy in the new world

  • 7. 
    Florida was established by James Edward Oglethorpe and a few colleagues to release imprisoned debtors from English jails and send them to America to establish a colony that would serve as a bulwark against the Spaniards to the south.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 8. 
    During the reign of his English King, a small group of Separatists departed for Leyden, Holland, where they were allowed to practice their religion as they wished. Later, some members of this Leyden congregation, who became known as the "Pilgrims," decided to emigrate to the New World, where, in 1620, they founded the colony of Plymouth.
    • A. 

      Charles I

    • B. 

      James I

    • C. 

      Charles II

    • D. 

      George I

  • 9. 
    This colony was a refuge for Catholics.
    • A. 

      New York

    • B. 

      Georgia

    • C. 

      Virginia

    • D. 

      Maryland

  • 10. 
     These two colonies developed into the trading center of the south. There the settlers quickly learned to combine agriculture and commerce, and the marketplace became a major source of prosperity. Dense forests also brought revenue; lumber, tar, and resin from the longleaf pine provided some of the best shipbuilding materials in the world. Not bound to a single crop as was Virginia,  they also produced and exported rice and indigo.
    • A. 

      North and South Carolina

    • B. 

      Georgia and Florida

    • C. 

      Maryland and Virginia

    • D. 

      New York and New Jersey

  • 11. 
    This university is the oldest continually operating degree-granting university in Europe, the word 'university' being first used by this institution at its foundation. 
    • A. 

      University of Paris

    • B. 

      Oxford University

    • C. 

      University of Bologna

    • D. 

      University of Modena

    • E. 

      University of Cambridge

  • 12. 
    This university is the oldest surviving university in the English-speaking world.
    • A. 

      University of Cambridge

    • B. 

      University of Montpellier

    • C. 

      University of Orleans

    • D. 

      University of Toulouse

    • E. 

      Oxford University

  • 13. 
    This early American textbook was a paddle-shaped board with a paper sheet attached. it contained the ABCs in both small and capital letters. It also contained short syllabic processions,  the benediction and either the Lord's Prayer or Scripture. It was covered with pellucid horn and decorated with jewels and leather by wealthy. 
  • 14. 
    The first school that both boys and girls might have attended in Colonial New England was a _________________. These schools operated in a woman's home and introduced the students to numbers, letters, and basic reading. Boys who attended these schools would be prepared to go to an elementary school where they would learn reading, writing, and religion. Girls who attended these schools also studied sewing.
  • 15. 
    The first public school law was passed in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1647.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 16. 
    The following ideas (1) the majesty of God, (2)the depravity of Man, (3) the notion of all work as a "calling" and part of God's plan, (4) the unlikelihood of salvation, and (5) the possibility that one's level of success in the world might indicate whether one had been blessed with salvation or not, are said to make up the powerful ideas of ___________
    • A. 

      The Industrial Revolution

    • B. 

      The Enlightenment

    • C. 

      Romanticism

    • D. 

      Puritan Protestantism

  • 17. 
    The following ideas, (1) reason is the ultimate arbiter, (2) science is the provider of ultimate explanations, (2) the individual is a reasoning intellect, capable of rational activity that can solve whatever problem happened to be at hand (4) man is perfectible, (5) if man's reason was released, instead of being bound by tradition, superstition, authority, and hierarchy, it could attack whatever social or political or economic problems that existed, figure them out, and provide solutions..., are said to make up some of the powerful ideas of ___________
    • A. 

      Puritan Protestantism

    • B. 

      The Enlightenment

    • C. 

      Romanticism

    • D. 

      The Industrial Revolution

    • E. 

      None of these

  • 18. 
    The following ideas, (1) Reason and rationality are dangerously over-emphasized over the heart, the soul, the spirit, the transcendent, (2) one's relationship with oneself, with one's own feelings, and with nature, that great repository of wisdom available to be intuited by the sensitive romantic spirit is primary. (3)that the individual is intuitive and emotional, are said to make up some of the powerful ideas of ___________
    • A. 

      The Enlightenment

    • B. 

      Romanticism

    • C. 

      The Industrial Revolution

    • D. 

      Puritan Protestantism

    • E. 

      None of These

  • 19. 
    In 1852, ________passed a compulsory elementary school attendance law, the first of its kind in the country.
    • A. 

      Virginia

    • B. 

      New Hampshire

    • C. 

      Connecticut

    • D. 

      Massachusetts

    • E. 

      None of these

  • 20. 
    According to Diane Ravitch, the first and most important tradition of American education is that ______ is primarily responsible for its children’s education.
    • A. 

      The church

    • B. 

      The state

    • C. 

      The family

    • D. 

      The community

    • E. 

      None of these

  • 21. 
    The first secondary in America was established in Boston in 1821. It was called __________but changed its name to High School. George B. Emerson was its first director.
    • A. 

      A Latin Grammar School

    • B. 

      An Academy

    • C. 

      An English Classical School

    • D. 

      A Dame School

  • 22. 
    The Massachusetts School Law of ____________broke with English tradition by transferring educational supervision from the clergy to the selectmen of the colony, empowering them to assess the education of children "to read & understand the principles of religion and the capital laws of this country." It held parents and masters responsible for their children's and apprentices' ability to read and write, stressing education rather than schooling. However, its implementation appears to have been somewhat neglected.
    • A. 

      1647

    • B. 

      1642

    • C. 

      1648

    • D. 

      1660

  • 23. 
    The Massachusetts School Law of ____________, or the Old Deluder Satan Act, required every town having more than 50 families to hire a teacher, and every town of more than 100 families to establish a "grammar school". Failure to comply with the mandate would result in a fine of £5. The grammar school clause was intended to prepare students to attend Harvard College, whose mission was to prepare young men for the ministry.
    • A. 

      1642

    • B. 

      1647

    • C. 

      1648

    • D. 

      1660

  • 24. 
    According to Diane Ravitch, in colonial days and in the first half-century of the new nation’s existence, there were many different kinds of schooling available (except for enslaved African Americans in the South).
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 25. 
    According to Diane Ravitch, the Latin grammar schools were set up for local children by towns and funded by a combination of tuition and taxes.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 26. 
    Students in these schools were generally housed with faculty masters or townspeople who would take in boarders.  Thus, the earliest of these schools were without dormitories as we know them today.  Further, the sense of “in loco parentis” was embraced by the host teacher or host family rather than the school itself. 
    • A. 

      Dame School

    • B. 

      Latin Grammar School

    • C. 

      Academy

    • D. 

      Church schools

  • 27. 
    In his proposal for an ____________ in Philadelphia, Franklin recommended the teaching of practical subjects such as English, modern languages, arithmetic, navigation, and drawing.
    • A. 

      Academy

    • B. 

      Latin Grammar School

    • C. 

      Dame School

    • D. 

      Church schools

  • 28. 
    The ___________was not primarily " fitting school." It was, instead, an institution of an independent sort, taking pupils who had already acquired the elements of an English education, and carrying them forward to some, rather indefinite, rounding out of their studies.
    • A. 

      Common school

    • B. 

      Academy

    • C. 

      Dame School

    • D. 

      Latin Grammar School

  • 29. 
    The term "___________" originated in ancient Greece, where Aristotle taught Athenians in a grove near the temple of Apollo Lyceus. In American history, this movement was a thrust for education of man, woman, and child through local lecture series
  • 30. 
    The ____________movement sprung up as a result of the Industrial Revolution, and originated in Scotland, where Dr. George Birbeck delivered lectures and scientific demonstrations to a Glasgow audience of young mechanics. Early in the nineteenth century, the movement spread to France, then the United States.
  • 31. 
    Josiah Holbrook’s vision of the "_________" which would spread knowledge to young and old, male and female began in America in 1826 and faded in the early twentieth century.
  • 32. 
    Like the hornbook,this teaching device was an early kind of "reading book" for young children. Once the price of paper became cheap, companies started to make these instead of hornbooks. The paper used to makethis device was a thin cardboard. The card was usually cut into the shape of a rectangle and then folded in thirds.
    • A. 

      Battledore

    • B. 

      New England Primer

    • C. 

      Hornbook

    • D. 

      Blue Backed Speller

    • E. 

      McGuffey Reader

  • 33. 
    This textbook was the first reading primer designed for the American Colonies. It became the most successful educational textbook published in colonial America and the early days of United States history
    • A. 

      Battledore

    • B. 

      New England Primer

    • C. 

      Hornbook

    • D. 

      Blue Backed Speller

    • E. 

      McGuffy Reader

  • 34. 
    Noah Webster (1758-1843) was the man of words in early 19th-century America. Compiler of a dictionary which has become the standard for American English, he also compiled The American Spelling Book, which was the basic textbook for young readers in early 19th-century America. It was also called the "_______________"
    • A. 

      Battledore

    • B. 

      Nw England Primer

    • C. 

      Hornbook

    • D. 

      McGuffy Reader

    • E. 

      Blue Backed Speller

  • 35. 
    One of the best known school books in the history of American education was the the 19th century ________________. It is estimated that at least 120 million copies of this textbook were sold between 1836 and 1960, placing its sales in a category with the Bible and Webster's Dictionary.
  • 36. 
    He produced what is considered to be the first dictionary created in the US. Most people called it the "Blue-backed Speller" because of its blue cover.
    • A. 

      W. H. McGuffey

    • B. 

      Noah Webster

    • C. 

      Samuel Goodrich

    • D. 

      Thomas Dilworth

  • 37. 
    The_____________movement took hold in America in the 1830s, and by the time of the Civil War organized systems of common schools had become commonplace throughout most of the northern and midwestern states.
    • A. 

      Progressive

    • B. 

      Critical theory

    • C. 

      Common school

    • D. 

      Normal school

  • 38. 
    On July 3, 1839, the first state-funded school specifically established for public teacher education opened in Lexington, Massachusetts. These schools were referred to as ____________schools.
  • 39. 
    Men loyal to Charles I after the defeat of their King by Oliver Cromwell fled to the colony of________________
  • 40. 
    This educator opened Mount Holyoke Seminary for Women in eighteen thirty-seven. Four teachers and the first class of eighty young women lived and studied in the building when the school opened. By the next year, the number of students had increased to one hundred sixteen. She knew the importance of what had been established -- the first independent school for the higher education of women.
  • 41. 
    Quakers, under the leadership of William Penn founded the colony known as _______________
    • A. 

      Maryland

    • B. 

      Connecticut

    • C. 

      Virginia

    • D. 

      New York

    • E. 

      None of these

  • 42. 
    Who is this? He was one of the founders of the Monitorial (School) System
  • 43. 
    The_______________was an education method that became popular at a global scale during the early 19th century. The method was based on the abler pupils being used as 'helpers' to the teacher, passing on the information they had learned to other students. It was founder by Andrew Bell and Joseph Lancaster in England.
    • A. 

      paidaia program

    • B. 

      Laboratory school

    • C. 

      Project method

    • D. 

      Monitorial system

  • 44. 
    This educator, after seven years in Virginia as a tutor,  returned to England, was ordained a deacon, and later (1789) became superintendent of an orphan asylum in Madras (now Chennai), India. Here he developed the monitorial system, which he described in a pamphlet, Experiment in Education, published upon his return to London (1797). Joseph Lancaster, a Quaker, established a school on similar principles, which was copied by large numbers of nonconformists. 
    • A. 

      Horace Mann

    • B. 

      Noah Webster

    • C. 

      Andrew Bell

    • D. 

      W.H. McGuffey

  • 45. 
    He believed that: (1) the public should no longer remain ignorant and free, (2) that such education should be paid for, controlled, and sustained by an interested public; (3) that this education will be best provided in schools that embrace children of all diversities; (4) that this education must be non-sectarian  (5) that this education must be taught by the spirit, methods, and discipline of a free society; and (6) that education should be provided by well-trained, professional teachers. 
    • A. 

      Daniel Webster

    • B. 

      Noah Webster

    • C. 

      Horace Greely

    • D. 

      Horace Mann

    • E. 

      Washington Irving

  • 46. 
    Who is this? This African American was 1st Black Ordained Presbyterian Minister in America. He was sent to Princeton to see if a negro could take a college education
    • A. 

      Benjamin Banneker

    • B. 

      Gabriel Prosser

    • C. 

      Denmark Vesey

    • D. 

      John Chavis

  • 47. 
    This educator was born February 15, 1820 in Adams Massachusetts. She was brought up in a Quaker family with long activist traditions. Early in her life she developed a sense of justice and moral zeal. After teaching for fifteen years, she became active in temperance. Because she was a woman, she was not allowed to speak at temperance rallies. This experience, and her acquaintance with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, led her to join the women's rights movement in 1852.
    • A. 

      Emma Willard

    • B. 

      Mary Lyon

    • C. 

      Marie Montessori

    • D. 

      Mary McCleod Bethune

    • E. 

      Susan B. Anthony

  • 48. 
    This educator/inventor was born on a Missouri farm near Diamond Grove (now called Diamond), Newton County in Marion Township, Missouri. He received a B.S. from the Iowa Agricultural College in 1894 and an M.S. in 1896. He became a member of the faculty of Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts in charge of the school's bacterial laboratory work in the Systematic Botany department. His work with agricultural products developed industrial applications from farm products, called chemurgy in technical literature in the early 1900s. His research developed 325 products from peanuts, 108 applications for sweet potatoes, and 75 products derived from pecans. He moved to Tuskegee, Alabama in 1896 to accept a position as an instructor at the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute and remained on the faculty until his death in 1943. His work in developing industrial applications from agricultural products derived 118 products, including a rubber substitute and over 500 dyes and pigments, from 28 different plants. He was responsible for the invention in 1927 of a process for producing paints and stains from soybeans, for which three separate patents were issued.  
    • A. 

      W.E.B. Dubois

    • B. 

      George Washington Carver

    • C. 

      Booker T. Washington

    • D. 

      John Chavis

  • 49. 
    Who is this? His ideas about education have profoundly influenced modern educational theory. He minimizes the importance of book learning, and recommends that a child's emotions should be educated before his reason. He placed a special emphasis on learning by experience.