Civil Rights Movement Quiz

Approved & Edited by ProProfs Editorial Team
The editorial team at ProProfs Quizzes consists of a select group of subject experts, trivia writers, and quiz masters who have authored over 10,000 quizzes taken by more than 100 million users. This team includes our in-house seasoned quiz moderators and subject matter experts. Our editorial experts, spread across the world, are rigorously trained using our comprehensive guidelines to ensure that you receive the highest quality quizzes.
Learn about Our Editorial Process
| By Kcarter052
K
Kcarter052
Community Contributor
Quizzes Created: 3 | Total Attempts: 2,128
Questions: 29 | Attempts: 1,803

SettingsSettingsSettings
Civil Rights Movement Quizzes & Trivia

Quiz #7. Civil rights movemnt. 2009. Yeah.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    In 1954 U.S. Supreme Court decision in the Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka case determined that

    • A.

      All registered voters have a right to vote

    • B.

      Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal and, therefore, unlawful

    • C.

      All residents have a right to a college education

    • D.

      Hiring in school’s must guarantee that no teacher will be discriminated against by race

    Correct Answer
    B. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal and, therefore, unlawful
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "separate educational facilities are inherently unequal and, therefore, unlawful." This answer is supported by the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court decision in the Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka case. The court ruled that segregated schools based on race were inherently unequal and violated the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. This landmark decision played a crucial role in desegregating public schools in the United States and advancing the civil rights movement.

    Rate this question:

  • 2. 

    Rodger Streitmatter, as do many historians, cites the Civil Rights Movement as

    • A.

      A political movement that was spurred by extensive newspaper coverage

    • B.

      Ill-timed, and would have been less violent if activists had waited a few years

    • C.

      The first great television news story

    • D.

      A political movement that was spurred by effective public relations techniques

    Correct Answer
    C. The first great television news story
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "the first great television news story". This answer is supported by the statement that Rodger Streitmatter, along with many historians, cites the Civil Rights Movement as a political movement that was spurred by extensive newspaper coverage. This suggests that the movement gained significant attention and coverage through the media, particularly television news, making it the first great television news story.

    Rate this question:

  • 3. 

    NBC correspondent John Chancellor said that with respect to the Civil Rights Movement, journalism does not initiate social change, but journalism

    • A.

      Can amplify social change

    • B.

      Can destroy movements by overexposure

    • C.

      Can set the record straight on who did what to whom

    • D.

      Can exaggerate the impact of social activists

    Correct Answer
    A. Can amplify social change
    Explanation
    Journalism has the power to amplify social change by bringing attention to important issues and giving a voice to marginalized groups. Through reporting, journalists can shed light on injustices, inspire public discourse, and mobilize communities towards positive action. By providing accurate and comprehensive coverage, journalism can play a crucial role in raising awareness and fostering understanding, ultimately leading to social change.

    Rate this question:

  • 4. 

    In the summer of 1957, African-American leaders targeted Central High School for desegregation with the enrollment of nine Black students. This took place in

    • A.

      New Orlenas, La.

    • B.

      Tupelo, Miss.

    • C.

      Birmingham, Ala.

    • D.

      Little Rock, Ark.

    Correct Answer
    D. Little Rock, Ark.
    Explanation
    In the summer of 1957, African-American leaders targeted Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas for desegregation with the enrollment of nine Black students.

    Rate this question:

  • 5. 

    The above action is regarded as the first chapter of television’s epic coverage of the movement because

    • A.

      It lead to a rapid change in school district policy on segregation

    • B.

      It turned what otherwise would have been a local story into a national news story

    • C.

      It was the first news story presented in full color, not just black and white

    • D.

      It gave Martin Luther King a forum for his beliefs

    Correct Answer
    B. It turned what otherwise would have been a local story into a national news story
    Explanation
    The above action is regarded as the first chapter of television's epic coverage of the movement because it turned what otherwise would have been a local story into a national news story. This suggests that the action had a significant impact on the coverage of the movement, making it more widely known and discussed across the country.

    Rate this question:

  • 6. 

    The most dramatic image that emerged from the Central High School desegregation effort was

    • A.

      The brutal treatment of a petite, 15-year-old Black girl by redneck segregationists

    • B.

      The relative calm that greeted a young Black male student as he approached local police at the school

    • C.

      The fire bomb that exploded on the school bus as the students entered the school

    • D.

      The lynching by a mob of two of the nine students

    Correct Answer
    A. The brutal treatment of a petite, 15-year-old Black girl by redneck segregationists
    Explanation
    The most dramatic image that emerged from the Central High School desegregation effort was the brutal treatment of a petite, 15-year-old Black girl by redneck segregationists. This answer is supported by the fact that it highlights the violent and discriminatory actions of the segregationists towards a young, vulnerable girl. It emphasizes the brutality and injustice of the situation, making it the most dramatic image among the options provided.

    Rate this question:

  • 7. 

    The first time that Charlayne Hunter-Gault, later of the New York Times and a Public Broadcasting Service correspondent, made the news was when 

    • A.

      She was one of the two African Americans first admitted to the Univ. of Georgia.

    • B.

      She defied a court order to leave a lunch counter in a segregated cafe.

    • C.

      She refused to ride in the back of a bus in Selma, Ala.

    • D.

      She shot a White Southerner who tried to assault her

    Correct Answer
    A. She was one of the two African Americans first admitted to the Univ. of Georgia.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is that Charlayne Hunter-Gault was one of the two African Americans first admitted to the University of Georgia. This answer is supported by the information provided in the question, which states that she made the news when she was admitted to the university.

    Rate this question:

  • 8. 

    The racially mixed group of college students and civil rights activists who rode buses from the North into segregated Southern communities was known as

    • A.

      Carpet baggers

    • B.

      Abolitionists

    • C.

      Freedom riders

    • D.

      Justice journeyers

    Correct Answer
    C. Freedom riders
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "freedom riders". The term "freedom riders" refers to the racially mixed group of college students and civil rights activists who rode buses from the North into segregated Southern communities. They aimed to challenge and protest against racial segregation and discrimination in public transportation and facilities. These individuals played a significant role in the civil rights movement and their actions helped bring attention to the injustices faced by African Americans in the South.

    Rate this question:

  • 9. 

    Police Commissioner “Bull” Connor held great influence over the town considered the most segregated city in America in the early 1960s. That city was 

    • A.

      Tupelo, Miss

    • B.

      Birmingham, Ala.

    • C.

      Little Rock, Ark.

    • D.

      New Orleans, La.

    Correct Answer
    B. Birmingham, Ala.
    Explanation
    Birmingham, Alabama was considered the most segregated city in America in the early 1960s, and Police Commissioner "Bull" Connor held great influence over the town. His policies and actions were notorious for promoting and enforcing racial segregation, as well as suppressing civil rights activities. This made Birmingham a significant focal point in the struggle for racial equality during the Civil Rights Movement.

    Rate this question:

  • 10. 

    That same city became the target in 1963 for what one activist hoped would be a series of supposed nonviolent protests. The person was 

    • A.

      Jesse Jackson

    • B.

      Andrew Young

    • C.

      Thurgood Marshall

    • D.

      Martin Luther King

    Correct Answer
    D. Martin Luther King
    Explanation
    Martin Luther King is the correct answer because he was a prominent civil rights activist who advocated for nonviolent protests. In 1963, he led the Birmingham campaign in Birmingham, Alabama, which aimed to challenge the city's segregation laws through peaceful demonstrations. King's involvement and leadership in this campaign made him the target of attention and opposition from local authorities and white supremacists. His efforts in Birmingham and his iconic "Letter from Birmingham Jail" helped to bring national attention to the civil rights movement and contributed to the eventual passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

    Rate this question:

  • 11. 

    Media images of Bull Connor’s use of police dogs and high-pressure fire hoses to subdue protestors, many of them children, led to a reaction from the public elsewhere. They reacted by 

    • A.

      Expressing embarrassment, but doing little else

    • B.

      Flooding the White House with phone calls for action

    • C.

      Organizing public marches of support in 40 cities around the country

    • D.

      Calling their Congressional representatives, asking for federal intervention

    Correct Answer
    C. Organizing public marches of support in 40 cities around the country
    Explanation
    The media images of Bull Connor's use of police dogs and high-pressure fire hoses to subdue protestors, particularly children, sparked a strong reaction from the public. Instead of simply expressing embarrassment and doing nothing, they took a more proactive approach. They organized public marches of support in 40 cities around the country. This action demonstrated their solidarity and determination to stand up against such acts of violence and injustice.

    Rate this question:

  • 12. 

    A massive demonstration and march took place in August 1963 with some 200,000 protestors whose actions were televised by all three networks. That event took place

    • A.

      Near Camp David where the President was staying

    • B.

      In the nation's capital

    • C.

      In New York City, the media capital of the country

    • D.

      in Selma, Ala., in the heart of Dixie

    Correct Answer
    B. In the nation's capital
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "in the nation's capital." This can be inferred from the statement that the event was televised by all three networks, indicating that it took place in a location easily accessible to media outlets. The phrase "the nation's capital" refers to Washington D.C., where the President was staying.

    Rate this question:

  • 13. 

    It was during this same massive march that the Rev. Martin Luther King delivered his

    • A.

      I’ve been to the mountaintop” speech

    • B.

      "i have a dream" speech

    • C.

      Last speech

    • D.

      First televised speech

    Correct Answer
    B. "i have a dream" speech
    Explanation
    During the massive march mentioned, the Rev. Martin Luther King delivered his famous "I have a dream" speech. This speech is widely recognized as one of the most significant and influential speeches in American history. In it, King spoke passionately about his dream of racial equality and justice, calling for an end to racism and discrimination. The speech resonated with millions of people and became a rallying cry for the civil rights movement.

    Rate this question:

  • 14. 

    In the DVD we viewed, the Edmund Pettis Bridge that Martin Luther King and his demonstrators crossed was in 

    • A.

      Jacksonville, Miss.

    • B.

      Athens, Ga.

    • C.

      Knoxville, Tenn.

    • D.

      Selma, Ala.

    Correct Answer
    D. Selma, Ala.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Selma, Ala. The question asks for the location of the Edmund Pettis Bridge that Martin Luther King and his demonstrators crossed. The answer is Selma, Alabama.

    Rate this question:

  • 15. 

    The other key piece of legislation that followed the Civil Rights Act was the

    • A.

      Affirmative Action Act of 1966

    • B.

      Equal Protection Act of 1965

    • C.

      Voting Rights Act of 1965

    • D.

      Faith, Family & Freedom Act of 1966

    Correct Answer
    C. Voting Rights Act of 1965
    Explanation
    The Voting Rights Act of 1965 is the correct answer because it was a significant piece of legislation that followed the Civil Rights Act. The Act aimed to overcome the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote, such as literacy tests and poll taxes. It prohibited discriminatory voting practices and provided federal oversight of elections in areas with a history of voter suppression. The Act played a crucial role in increasing African American voter registration and participation, and it has been instrumental in protecting voting rights for marginalized communities.

    Rate this question:

  • 16. 

    The United States’ initial involvement in Vietnam began

    • A.

      In the late 1960s with Pres. Johnson

    • B.

      In the late 1950s with Pres. Eisenhower

    • C.

      In the early 1960s with Pres. Kennedy

    • D.

      In the early 1950s with Pres. Truman

    Correct Answer
    D. In the early 1950s with Pres. Truman
    Explanation
    In the early 1950s, President Truman initiated the United States' involvement in Vietnam. This was during the time of the Cold War and the spread of communism. Truman provided economic and military aid to the French, who were fighting against communist forces in Vietnam. This support laid the groundwork for further American involvement in the region in the following decades.

    Rate this question:

  • 17. 

    In 1954, Vietnam was divided in half. The north was

    • A.

      Communist controlled and based in Hanoi

    • B.

      Democratically controlled and based in Hanoi

    • C.

      Democratically controlled and based in Saigon

    • D.

      Communist controlled and based in Saigon

    Correct Answer
    A. Communist controlled and based in Hanoi
    Explanation
    In 1954, Vietnam was divided into two parts, with the northern region being under communist control and based in Hanoi. This division occurred as a result of the Geneva Accords, which aimed to temporarily divide the country until a nationwide election could be held. The communist-controlled government in the north was led by Ho Chi Minh and the capital was established in Hanoi. The southern region, on the other hand, was democratically controlled and based in Saigon. This division eventually led to the Vietnam War as tensions between the two regions escalated.

    Rate this question:

  • 18. 

    In 1964, North Vietnamese patrol boats fired on U.S. destroyers in a Vietnamese gulf location. This attack led to a Congressional action known as 

    • A.

      The Viet Cong Retaliation Resolution

    • B.

      The Port of Hanoi Resolution

    • C.

      The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution

    • D.

      The Resolution of Vietnamese Sovereignty

    Correct Answer
    C. The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution
    Explanation
    The correct answer is the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution. In 1964, North Vietnamese patrol boats attacked U.S. destroyers in the Gulf of Tonkin. As a result, the U.S. Congress passed the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, which authorized the President to take any necessary measures to protect American forces and assist South Vietnam in their fight against communism. This resolution effectively escalated U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War.

    Rate this question:

  • 19. 

    By war’s end after more than 10 years, how many U.S. men and women died in the war?

    • A.

      5,000

    • B.

      8,000

    • C.

      58,000

    • D.

      1 to 3 million

    Correct Answer
    C. 58,000
    Explanation
    During the war, more than 58,000 U.S. men and women lost their lives. This indicates that a significant number of casualties occurred during the conflict.

    Rate this question:

  • 20. 

    By war’s end after more than 10 years, how many estimated Southeast Asians died in the war?

    • A.

      5,000

    • B.

      8,000

    • C.

      58,000

    • D.

      1 to 3 million

    Correct Answer
    D. 1 to 3 million
    Explanation
    The correct answer is 1 to 3 million. This estimate suggests that a significant number of Southeast Asians died in the war, indicating the devastating impact of the conflict on the region. The range of 1 to 3 million reflects the difficulty in accurately determining the exact number of casualties, but it highlights the magnitude of the loss of life during this period.

    Rate this question:

  • 21. 

    By 1972, two out of three U.S. citizens named which medium as their main source of news

    • A.

      Television

    • B.

      Magazines

    • C.

      Newspapers

    • D.

      Radio

    Correct Answer
    A. Television
    Explanation
    In 1972, the majority of U.S. citizens considered television as their primary source of news. This can be attributed to the increasing popularity and accessibility of television during that time. Television provided a visual and immediate way of receiving news updates, making it a preferred medium for many people. Additionally, the rise of television journalism and the introduction of 24-hour news channels further solidified its position as the main source of news for the majority of Americans.

    Rate this question:

  • 22. 

    Through 1967, most news coverage of the war was favorable. However, what event in 1968 turned the coverage into one that was more critical?

    • A.

      The Tet Offensive

    • B.

      The Hanoi bombing

    • C.

      The Tonkin Offensive

    • D.

      The Cu Chi firefight

    Correct Answer
    A. The Tet Offensive
    Explanation
    The Tet Offensive in 1968 turned the coverage of the war into a more critical one. This was a major military campaign launched by the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong forces against South Vietnam and the United States during the Vietnam War. The offensive caught the American and South Vietnamese forces off guard and resulted in heavy casualties and significant damage. The media coverage of this event brought attention to the realities and challenges of the war, leading to a shift in public opinion and a more critical view of the conflict.

    Rate this question:

  • 23. 

    The most controversial story of the early years of the war was by Morley Safer of CBS who covered events in the village of Cam Ne. That story showed

    • A.

      American soldiers in full retreat after an ambush

    • B.

      Bombers strafing rice paddies in the Mekong Delta

    • C.

      American soldiers being shot at by Vietnamese children

    • D.

      American soldiers burning down 150 houses by using their "Zippo" lighters

    Correct Answer
    D. American soldiers burning down 150 houses by using their "Zippo" lighters
    Explanation
    The most controversial story of the early years of the war was by Morley Safer of CBS who covered events in the village of Cam Ne. This story showed American soldiers burning down 150 houses by using their "Zippo" lighters.

    Rate this question:

  • 24. 

    The Viet Cong offensive during their Lunar New Year holiday in 1968 was

    • A.

      A military failure by U.S. troops

    • B.

      A military failure by North Vietnam

    • C.

      A military failure by South Vietnamese troops

    • D.

      a military success for the Viet Cong

    Correct Answer
    B. A military failure by North Vietnam
    Explanation
    The correct answer is a military failure by North Vietnam. The Viet Cong offensive during the Lunar New Year holiday in 1968 was a strategic move by North Vietnam to launch a large-scale attack on South Vietnam. However, despite initial success in capturing some key cities and military bases, the offensive ultimately failed to achieve its objectives. The U.S. and South Vietnamese forces were able to push back the Viet Cong and regain control of the areas that had been taken. This failure weakened the Viet Cong's position and demonstrated the resilience and effectiveness of the U.S. and South Vietnamese forces.

    Rate this question:

  • 25. 

    In effect, what the televised news about the above offensive did to U.S. policy was

    • A.

      To give comfort to U.S. troops and their commanders to “stay the course”

    • B.

      To damage peace negotiations between North and South Vietnamese

    • C.

      To cause severe damage to the credibility of the Lyndon B. Johnson administration

    • D.

      To bolster the resolve of the American public to win the war

    Correct Answer
    C. To cause severe damage to the credibility of the Lyndon B. Johnson administration
    Explanation
    The televised news about the offensive caused severe damage to the credibility of the Lyndon B. Johnson administration. This means that the news undermined the trust and confidence that people had in the administration's ability to handle the situation effectively. This could have resulted in a loss of support for the administration's policies and decisions regarding the war.

    Rate this question:

  • 26. 

    One of the most shocking and enduring images of the brutality and senselessness of the war occurred on the streets of Saigon when a North Vietnamese prisoner was arrested. Recorded for television during the arrest was 

    • A.

      The suicide bombing by the prisoner as he was taken before authorities

    • B.

      The attack by citizens on the prisoner

    • C.

      The escape of the prisoner without any resistance from his captors

    • D.

      The execution of the prisoner by a point-blank shot to his head

    Correct Answer
    D. The execution of the prisoner by a point-blank shot to his head
    Explanation
    The correct answer is the execution of the prisoner by a point-blank shot to his head. This is the only option that accurately describes the outcome of the situation mentioned in the passage. The passage states that the prisoner was arrested and then executed, which is supported by the phrase "recorded for television during the arrest was the execution of the prisoner." The other options, such as the suicide bombing by the prisoner or the attack by citizens, are not mentioned in the passage and do not align with the given information.

    Rate this question:

  • 27. 

    The man who set the tone for television coverage after the cataclysmic New Year’s offensive by the North Vietnamese was “the most trusted man in America.” He was

    • A.

      Chet Huntley

    • B.

      David Halberstam

    • C.

      Walter Cronkite

    • D.

      David Brinkley

    Correct Answer
    C. Walter Cronkite
    Explanation
    Walter Cronkite was known as "the most trusted man in America" and was a prominent figure in television news. He set the tone for television coverage after the North Vietnamese New Year's offensive, indicating that he played a significant role in shaping public perception and understanding of the event.

    Rate this question:

  • 28. 

    That same broadcaster’s negative assessment of the war at that point led Pres. Johnson to reassess his position. What did he decide to do?

    • A.

      Not run for reelection

    • B.

      Increase military funding for the war

    • C.

      Seek the help of U.N. coalition forces

    • D.

      Announce an impassioned plea for reelection in order to win the war

    Correct Answer
    A. Not run for reelection
    Explanation
    The negative assessment of the war by the broadcaster made President Johnson reconsider his position. As a result, he decided not to run for reelection.

    Rate this question:

  • 29. 

    Contributing to the tone of news coverage was the report of an incident at the village of My Lai. What did news reports say?

    • A.

      That U.S. soldiers had retreated, despite orders from company commanders to fight

    • B.

      That U.S soldiers had destroyed the village and killed hundreds of civilians

    • C.

      That children of the village were offered for sale to U.S. troops

    • D.

      That U.S. soldiers had been given defective weapons and died defenseless in the village

    Correct Answer
    B. That U.S soldiers had destroyed the village and killed hundreds of civilians
    Explanation
    The news reports stated that U.S. soldiers had destroyed the village of My Lai and killed hundreds of civilians.

    Rate this question:

Related Topics

Back to Top Back to top
Advertisement
×

Wait!
Here's an interesting quiz for you.

We have other quizzes matching your interest.