The 7 Deadly Sins Of Acute Paediatrics

7 Questions | Total Attempts: 74

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Seven Deadly Sins Quizzes & Trivia

Taking care of a sick child is no easy task. A pediatrician is charged with taking proper care of the sick kids. As a medical practitioner how knowledgeable are you about the 7 deadly sins of acute pediatrics? Take up the easy quiz below and find out. Best of luck!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    An inspiratory chest x-ray is important for: (tick all that are true)
    • A. 

      Diagnosis of a child with cough, fever, right sided basal creps

    • B. 

      Where creps are heard during an acute exacerbation of asthma

    • C. 

      Suspected inhalation of a foreign body

    • D. 

      Diagnosis of child who is toxic and has abdominal pain

    • E. 

      Where tachypnoea is marked but the chest is clear

  • 2. 
    I would start IV fluids on a child with gastroenteritis if: (tick all that are correct)
    • A. 

      Clinical condition worsened after 4 hours of oral rehydration

    • B. 

      Urea was high on bloods

    • C. 

      Child continued to vomit with oral rehydration

    • D. 

      Signs of shock

  • 3. 
    A&E refer a child with a "febrile convulsion".  The following would cast doubt on the diagnosis: (tick all that are correct)
    • A. 

      Age over 6yrs

    • B. 

      Impaired consciousness prior to the seizure

    • C. 

      Seizure lasting more than 30 minutes

    • D. 

      Focal seizure or posturing

    • E. 

      Lack of incontinence

  • 4. 
    6yr old girl presents with widespread itchy rash for last 3 days.  Otherwise well, but has had similar rashes in the past.  Mum thinks it could be a reaction to orange juice.  On examination, she has a marked urticarial rash with some puffiness of the hands and feet. Do you: (tick all that apply)
    • A. 

      Treat with antihistamines

    • B. 

      Take blood for IgE to orange

    • C. 

      Diagnose allergy and advise avoidance of orange

    • D. 

      A combination of sedating and non-sedating antihistamines may be required

    • E. 

      Take blood for c1 esterase inhibitor

  • 5. 
    2yr old boy is admitted with 24 hour history of recurrent vomiting and diarrhoea.  He is moderately dehydrated and fails to improve with a period of oral rehydration.  IV 0.45% NaCl and 5% dextrose is started at maintenance rate.  His U&Es come back:Na 130 K 3.3 U 8 Cr 56
    • A. 

      Add potassium 10mmol/500ml to IV fluids

    • B. 

      Increase rate to correct 5% dehydration over 48 hours

    • C. 

      Change to 0.9% saline with 5% dextrose

    • D. 

      Repeat U&Es within 24 hours if continuing to vomit or fails to improve

    • E. 

      Acute pontine myelinosis is a recognized complication of IV rehydration

  • 6. 
    15yr old girl presents with recurrent vomits over 2 days.  Seen by GP, started on Amoxicillin. 2 hours after taking antibiotic, fet tightness in her throat, unable to swallow, some chest pain, itching.  Ambulance phoned, gave IM piriton.  No rash seen.   On admission, obs are normal, examination normal.
    • A. 

      She is probably allergic to amoxicillin

    • B. 

      She might be allergic to amoxicillin, and should avoid it

    • C. 

      She is unlikely to be allergic to amoxicillin and can have it

    • D. 

      She might be allergic to amoxicillin and should have an allergy test

  • 7. 
    12yr old boy with 6 month history of sporadic abdominal pain.  His appetite can be affected but he is not losing weight.  There is no change in bowel habit.  He has had some benefit from Ranitidine.
    • A. 

      He probably has dyspepsia

    • B. 

      He should complete a six week course of Ranitidine

    • C. 

      He should have Helicobacter serology checked

    • D. 

      He should have a Helicobacter stool antigen checked