Oxidation-reduction Reactions 5/17/11

35 Questions | Total Attempts: 299

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    What was the original meaning of the term oxidation?  
    • A. 

      Oxidation originally meant the combination of an element with oxygen to produce oxides.

    • B. 

      Oxidation originally meant the combination of an compound with oxygen to produce oxides

    • C. 

      Oxidation originally meant the combination of an element with oxygen to produce water.

  • 2. 
    Gasoline, wood, coal, and natural gas (methane) can all burn in air, producing oxides of carbon.  Bleaching is an example of oxidation.  Rusting is an example of oxidation. 
    • A. 

      True about Aluminum oxide

    • B. 

      True about hydrogen

    • C. 

      True about oxidation

  • 3. 
    CH4(g)2O2(g) JKL CO2(g) 2H2O(g)  
    • A. 

      Iron atoms slowly combine with oxygen in moist air to produce compounds such as iron(III) oxide.

    • B. 

      Methane and oxygen are combining to produce carbon dioxide and water vapor and a great deal of heat.

    • C. 

      When iron oxide is reduced to metallic iron, it gains oxygen.

  • 4. 
    4Fe(s) 3O2(g) JKL 2Fe2O3(s)  
    • A. 

      Iron atoms slowly combine with oxygen in moist air to produce compounds such as iron(III) oxide.

    • B. 

      When iron oxide is reduced to metallic iron, it gains oxygen.

    • C. 

      Iron atoms slowly combine with oxygen in moist air to produce compounds such as iron(III) oxide.

  • 5. 
    What is the name of the process that is the opposite of oxidation? 
    • A. 

      Same

    • B. 

      Increase

    • C. 

      Reduction

  • 6. 
    Oxidation never occurs without reduction and reduction never occurs without oxidation.  Oxidation–reduction reactions are also known as redox reactions.    You need to add heat in order to reduce iron ore to produce metallic iron. 
    • A. 

      True about oxidation and reduction.

    • B. 

      True about electrons in redox reactions.

    • C. 

      True about the rate of corrosion.

  • 7. 
    What substance is heated along with iron ore in order to reduce the metal oxide to metallic iron? 
    • A. 

      Charcoal (carbon)

    • B. 

      Redox reaction

    • C. 

      Covalent compounds

  • 8. 
    What do the iron artifacts tell you about what chemistry early Iron Age people knew 2500 years ago? 
    • A. 

      Early Iron Age people knew how to keep the same amount of iron ore to metallic iron by heating the ore with charcoal.

    • B. 

      Early Iron Age people knew how to increase iron ore to metallic iron by heating the ore with charcoal.

    • C. 

      Early Iron Age people knew how to reduce iron ore to metallic iron by heating the ore with charcoal.

  • 9. 
    When iron ore is reduced to metallic iron, what oxidation reaction occurs at the same time?  time?   
    • A. 

      Carbon combines with oxygen from the iron(III) oxide to form carbon zioxide.

    • B. 

      Carbon combines with oxygen from the iron(III) oxide to form carbon monoxide.

    • C. 

      Carbon combines with oxygen from the iron(III) oxide to form carbon dioxide.

  • 10. 
    What do the iron artifacts tell you about what chemistry early Iron Age people knew 2500 years ago? 
    • A. 

      Early Iron Age people knew how to reduce iron ore to metallic iron by heating the ore with charcoal.

    • B. 

      Early Iron Age people knew how to increase iron ore to metallic iron by heating the ore with charcoal.

    • C. 

      Early Iron Age people knew how to keep the same iron ore to metallic iron by heating the ore with charcoal.

  • 11. 
    When iron ore is reduced to metallic iron, what oxidation reaction occurs at the same time?  time?   
    • A. 

      Carbon combines with oxygen from the coal(III) oxide to form carbon dioxide.

    • B. 

      Carbon combines with oxygen from the iron(III) oxide to form carbon dioxide.

    • C. 

      Carbon combines with oxygen from the lead(III) oxide to form carbon dioxide.

  • 12. 
    The concepts of oxidation and reduction have been extended to include many reactions that do not even involve _______________.  involve oxygen.   
    • A. 

      Water

    • B. 

      Oxygen

    • C. 

      Iron

  • 13. 
    What is understood about electrons in redox reactions? 
    • A. 

      Redox reactions involve a shift of nuetrons between reactants.

    • B. 

      Redox reactions involve a shift of protons between reactants.

    • C. 

      Redox reactions involve a shift of electrons between reactants.

  • 14. 
    When magnesium and sulfur are heated together, they undergo a ______________reaction to form magnesium sulfide. 
    • A. 

      Redox

    • B. 

      Reflox

    • C. 

      Remox

  • 15. 
    ________________ are transferred from the metal atoms to the nonmetal atoms in this reaction. 
    • A. 

      Protons

    • B. 

      Nuetrons

    • C. 

      Electrons

  • 16. 
    A redox reaction may produce covalent _____________________. 
    • A. 

      Mixtures

    • B. 

      Compounds

    • C. 

      Substances

  • 17. 
    Preventing and repairing damage from corrosion of metals requires _____________ of dollars every year. 
    • A. 

      Billions

    • B. 

      Millions

    • C. 

      Trillions

  • 18. 
    Iron corrodes by being oxidized to ions of iron by _________________. 
    • A. 

      Oxygen

    • B. 

      Hydrogen

    • C. 

      Carbon dioxide

  • 19. 
    The presence of salts and acids increases the rate of corrosion by producing conducting solutions that make the transfer of _____________ easier. 
    • A. 

      Nuetrons

    • B. 

      Protons

    • C. 

      Electrons

  • 20. 
    Why are gold and platinum called noble metals? 
    • A. 

      Because gold and platinum are very resistant to gaining their electrons through corrosion

    • B. 

      Because gold and platinum are very resistant to losing their electrons through corrosion

    • C. 

      Because gold and platinum are very resistant to keeping their electrons through corrosion

  • 21. 
    Explain how differences between the oxides affect further corrosion of the metals.  oxides affect further corrosion of the metals.   
    • A. 

      Aluminum oxide forms a tightly packed protective layer that does not admit water. Because iron(III) oxide is not tightly packed, it allows water to penetrate and attack the metal below.

    • B. 

      Sodium oxide forms a tightly packed protective layer that does not admit water. Because iron(III) oxide is not tightly packed, it allows water to penetrate and attack the metal below.

    • C. 

      Patrolium oxide forms a tightly packed protective layer that does not admit water. Because iron(III) oxide is not tightly packed, it allows water to penetrate and attack the metal below.

  • 22. 
    As a general rule, a bonded atom’s oxidation number is the charge that it would have if the electrons in the bond were assigned to the more ___________________element. ..
    • A. 

      electropositive

    • B. 

      electronegative

    • C. 

      electronuetral

  • 23. 
    Even though water is a molecular compound, you can still obtain oxidation numbers for the bonded elements by pretending that the electrons contributed by the __________________atoms are completely transferred to oxygen. 
    • A. 

      Oxygen

    • B. 

      Water

    • C. 

      Hydrogen

  • 24. 
    Write the oxidation number, or the sum of the oxidation numbers, for the given atoms, ions, or compounds.  __________   Cu(II) ion 
    • A. 

      -1

    • B. 

      -2

    • C. 

      +2

  • 25. 
    Write the oxidation number, or the sum of the oxidation numbers, for the given atoms, ions, or compounds.   _______Hydrogen in water 
    • A. 

      +2

    • B. 

      +1

    • C. 

      -1

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