Toughest MCQ On Nervous System: Quiz!

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Toughest MCQ On Nervous System: Quiz! - Quiz

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Medical conditions: A patient who has paralysis of one side of the body is called?

    • A.

      Paraplegia

    • B.

      Tetraplegia

    • C.

      Hemiplegia

    • D.

      Monopegia

    • E.

      Meningitis

    Correct Answer
    C. Hemiplegia
    Explanation
    Hemiplegia is the correct answer because it refers to the medical condition where a patient experiences paralysis on one side of their body. This condition can be caused by various factors such as stroke, brain injury, or nerve damage. Paraplegia refers to paralysis of the lower body, tetraplegia refers to paralysis of all four limbs, monopegia is not a recognized medical term, and meningitis is an inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord, which is not directly related to paralysis on one side of the body.

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  • 2. 

    How many functions does the nervous system have?

    • A.

      3

    • B.

      1

    • C.

      2

    • D.

      4

    • E.

      5

    • F.

      6

    Correct Answer
    A. 3
    Explanation
    The nervous system has three main functions: sensory function, integrative function, and motor function. The sensory function involves receiving information from the senses and transmitting it to the brain. The integrative function involves processing and interpreting the sensory information. The motor function involves responding to the sensory information by initiating appropriate actions or movements. Therefore, the correct answer is 3.

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  • 3. 

    The central nervous system consists of the?

    • A.

      The brain

    • B.

      The spinal cord

    • C.

      12 cranial nerves

    • D.

      33 spinal nerves

    • E.

      31 spinal nerves

    • F.

      Autonomic nervous

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. The brain
    B. The spinal cord
    Explanation
    The central nervous system consists of the brain and the spinal cord. These two structures are responsible for coordinating and controlling the activities of the body. The brain is the command center of the nervous system, controlling all bodily functions, thoughts, and emotions. The spinal cord acts as a pathway for transmitting signals between the brain and the rest of the body. Together, the brain and spinal cord make up the central nervous system, playing a vital role in regulating and maintaining bodily functions.

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  • 4. 

    The peripheral nervous system consists of the:

    • A.

      12 cranial nerves

    • B.

      31 spinal nerves

    • C.

      Autonomic nervous

    • D.

      33 spinal nerves

    • E.

      The spinal cord

    • F.

      The brain

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. 12 cranial nerves
    B. 31 spinal nerves
    C. Autonomic nervous
    Explanation
    The peripheral nervous system is made up of the 12 cranial nerves, 31 spinal nerves, and the autonomic nervous system. The 12 cranial nerves originate from the brain and control various functions such as vision, hearing, and taste. The 31 spinal nerves originate from the spinal cord and transmit sensory and motor signals to different parts of the body. The autonomic nervous system regulates involuntary actions like heart rate and digestion. Therefore, the correct answer includes all these components of the peripheral nervous system.

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  • 5. 

    Sensory is conducting impulses away from the brain?

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    The statement is false because sensory impulses are conducted towards the brain, not away from it. Sensory neurons are responsible for transmitting information from sensory receptors in the body to the brain, allowing us to perceive and interpret various stimuli such as touch, taste, smell, sight, and hearing. These impulses travel along the sensory pathways towards the brain, where they are processed and integrated to create our sensory experiences.

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  • 6. 

    The brain weighs about?

    • A.

      3lb

    • B.

      1lb

    • C.

      2lb

    • D.

      4lb

    • E.

      5lb

    Correct Answer
    A. 3lb
    Explanation
    The average weight of the human brain is approximately 3 pounds.

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  • 7. 

    The brain is made up of?

    • A.

      Cerebrum

    • B.

      Cerebellum

    • C.

      Brain stem

    • D.

      31 spinal nerves

    • E.

      12 cranial nerves

    • F.

      The spinal cord

    • G.

      Autonomic nervous system

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Cerebrum
    B. Cerebellum
    C. Brain stem
    Explanation
    The brain is made up of three main parts: the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The cerebrum is responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, memory, and perception. The cerebellum controls coordination and balance. The brain stem is involved in basic functions like breathing and heart rate. The other options listed, such as the spinal nerves, cranial nerves, spinal cord, and autonomic nervous system, are not parts of the brain but are related to the nervous system.

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  • 8. 

    The cerebrum consists of how many hemispheres?

    • A.

      2

    • B.

      1

    • C.

      3

    • D.

      4

    • E.

      5

    Correct Answer
    A. 2
    Explanation
    The cerebrum consists of two hemispheres. Each hemisphere is responsible for controlling the opposite side of the body and has specialized functions. The left hemisphere is typically associated with language, logic, and analytical thinking, while the right hemisphere is more involved in creativity, intuition, and spatial awareness. The two hemispheres are connected by a bundle of nerve fibers called the corpus callosum, allowing them to communicate and work together.

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  • 9. 

    Which part of the brain contains the heat-regulating center?

    • A.

      Hypothalamus

    • B.

      Thalamus

    • C.

      Mid brain

    • D.

      Pons varolii

    • E.

      Medulla oblongata

    Correct Answer
    A. Hypothalamus
    Explanation
    The hypothalamus is responsible for regulating body temperature. It acts as the heat-regulating center in the brain, helping to maintain a stable internal body temperature. It receives information from temperature receptors throughout the body and responds by initiating appropriate heat loss or heat conservation mechanisms. The hypothalamus also plays a role in other physiological processes such as hunger, thirst, and sleep.

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  • 10. 

    The (?) controls and maintenance of balance, muscle coordination, and muscle tone.

    • A.

      Cerebellum

    • B.

      Cerebrum

    • C.

      Brain stem

    • D.

      Mid brain

    • E.

      Pons varolii

    Correct Answer
    A. Cerebellum
    Explanation
    The cerebellum is responsible for controlling and maintaining balance, muscle coordination, and muscle tone. It plays a crucial role in coordinating voluntary movements, ensuring smooth and coordinated muscle contractions, and maintaining posture and balance. It receives information from various sensory systems and integrates this information to fine-tune movements and maintain equilibrium. Dysfunction of the cerebellum can lead to problems with coordination, balance, and muscle control.

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  • 11. 

    The brain stem comprises the?

    • A.

      Mid brain

    • B.

      Pons varolii

    • C.

      Medulla oblongata

    • D.

      Cerebellum

    • E.

      Cerebrum

    • F.

      The brain

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Mid brain
    B. Pons varolii
    C. Medulla oblongata
    Explanation
    The brain stem comprises the midbrain, pons varolii, and medulla oblongata. These three structures are located at the base of the brain and are responsible for vital functions such as controlling breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. The midbrain is involved in sensory and motor functions, while the pons varolii serves as a bridge between different parts of the brain. The medulla oblongata controls involuntary actions such as swallowing and vomiting. Therefore, all three options are correct and together make up the brain stem.

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  • 12. 

    The brain and spinal cord are completely surrounded by a protective membrane called?

    • A.

      Meninges

    • B.

      Bone

    • C.

      Muscle

    • D.

      Blood

    Correct Answer
    A. Meninges
    Explanation
    The brain and spinal cord are completely surrounded and protected by a membrane called meninges. The meninges consist of three layers: the dura mater, arachnoid mater, and pia mater. These layers provide cushioning and support for the delicate neural tissue, preventing it from being damaged by external forces or friction. Additionally, the meninges help regulate the flow of cerebrospinal fluid, which further protects the brain and spinal cord by providing nourishment and removing waste products.

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  • 13. 

    The tough fibrous membrane of the meninges is called the?

    • A.

      Dura mater

    • B.

      Arachnoid mater

    • C.

      Pia mater

    Correct Answer
    A. Dura mater
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Dura mater. The dura mater is the tough fibrous membrane that forms the outermost layer of the meninges, which are the protective coverings that surround the brain and spinal cord. It is the thickest and strongest layer of the meninges and provides support and protection to the underlying structures.

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  • 14. 

    The middle layer of the meninges is called the?

    • A.

      Arachnoid mater

    • B.

      Pia mater

    • C.

      Dura mater

    Correct Answer
    A. Arachnoid mater
    Explanation
    The middle layer of the meninges is called the arachnoid mater. The meninges are three protective layers that surround the brain and spinal cord. The arachnoid mater is located between the dura mater (outer layer) and the pia mater (inner layer). It is a thin, web-like membrane that helps cushion and protect the brain and spinal cord from injury.

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  • 15. 

    The inner membrane of the meninges is called the?

    • A.

      Pia mater

    • B.

      Arachnoid mater

    • C.

      Dura mater

    Correct Answer
    A. Pia mater
    Explanation
    The inner membrane of the meninges is called the pia mater. The meninges is a protective layer that surrounds the brain and spinal cord. The pia mater is the innermost layer of the meninges and is in direct contact with the brain and spinal cord. It is a thin, delicate membrane that closely adheres to the surface of the brain and spinal cord, providing support and protection.

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  • 16. 

    How many functions does the the meninges have?

    • A.

      3

    • B.

      1

    • C.

      2

    • D.

      4

    • E.

      5

    Correct Answer
    A. 3
    Explanation
    The meninges have three main functions. Firstly, they protect the brain and spinal cord by acting as a barrier against physical trauma and infections. Secondly, they help to maintain the stability of the brain within the skull by providing support and cushioning. Lastly, the meninges also play a role in the circulation of cerebrospinal fluid, which helps to nourish and remove waste from the brain and spinal cord.

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  • 17. 

    How many ventricles does the brain have?

    • A.

      4

    • B.

      1

    • C.

      2

    • D.

      3

    • E.

      0

    Correct Answer
    A. 4
    Explanation
    The brain has four ventricles. Ventricles are fluid-filled spaces within the brain that produce and circulate cerebrospinal fluid. They are responsible for providing cushioning and support to the brain, as well as removing waste products. The four ventricles are called the lateral ventricles (two in each hemisphere), the third ventricle (located in the midline of the brain), and the fourth ventricle (located between the brainstem and the cerebellum).

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  • 18. 

    The ventricles of the brain produce and contain?

    • A.

      CSF

    • B.

      Blood

    • C.

      Red blood cells

    • D.

      White cells

    • E.

      Water

    • F.

      Nuclei

    Correct Answer
    A. CSF
    Explanation
    The ventricles of the brain produce and contain cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF is a clear, colorless fluid that surrounds the brain and spinal cord, providing cushioning and protection. It is produced by specialized cells in the ventricles called choroid plexus. CSF helps to regulate the chemical environment of the brain, remove waste products, and deliver nutrients to the brain cells. It also acts as a shock absorber, protecting the brain from injury.

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  • 19. 

    How many cranial nerves are there?

    • A.

      12

    • B.

      10

    • C.

      4

    • D.

      8

    • E.

      5

    • F.

      3

    Correct Answer
    A. 12
    Explanation
    There are 12 cranial nerves in the human body. These nerves originate from the brain and are responsible for various functions such as sensory perception, motor control, and autonomic regulation of the head, neck, and facial regions. Each cranial nerve has a specific role and innervates different areas of the body, including the eyes, ears, tongue, and facial muscles.

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  • 20. 

    The spinal cord extends to the?

    • A.

      2 lumbar vertebra

    • B.

      3 lumbar vertebra

    • C.

      4 lumbar vertebra

    • D.

      5 lumbar vertebra

    • E.

      6 lumbar vertebra

    • F.

      7 lumbar vertebra

    • G.

      8 lumbar vertebra

    Correct Answer
    A. 2 lumbar vertebra
    Explanation
    The correct answer is 2 lumbar vertebra. The spinal cord extends to the second lumbar vertebra.

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  • 21. 

    How many types of peripheral nerves are there?

    • A.

      2

    • B.

      1

    • C.

      5

    • D.

      4

    Correct Answer
    A. 2
    Explanation
    Sensory and motor.

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  • 22. 

    Medical conditions: A patient who has paralysis of lower limbs which may involve the bladder and rectum is called?

    • A.

      Paraplegia

    • B.

      Tetraplegia

    • C.

      Hemiplegia

    • D.

      Monopegia

    • E.

      Meningitis

    Correct Answer
    A. Paraplegia
    Explanation
    Paraplegia is the correct answer because it refers to the medical condition where a patient experiences paralysis of the lower limbs, which can also affect the bladder and rectum. Paraplegia typically occurs due to spinal cord injuries or diseases that affect the lower part of the spinal cord. This condition results in a loss of sensation and motor function in the lower body, while the upper body remains unaffected.

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  • 23. 

    Medical conditions: A patient who has paralysis of all 4 limbs is called?

    • A.

      Paraplegia

    • B.

      Tetraplegia

    • C.

      Hemiplegia

    • D.

      Monopegia

    • E.

      Meningitis

    Correct Answer
    B. Tetraplegia
    Explanation
    Tetraplegia is the correct answer because it refers to the paralysis of all four limbs. This condition is also known as quadriplegia and is typically caused by a spinal cord injury. Paraplegia, on the other hand, refers to the paralysis of the lower half of the body, while hemiplegia refers to paralysis on one side of the body. Monopegia is not a recognized medical term, and meningitis is an infection that causes inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord.

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  • 24. 

    Medical conditions: A patient who has paralysis of 1 limb is called?

    • A.

      Paraplegia

    • B.

      Tetraplegia

    • C.

      Hemiplegia

    • D.

      Monopegia

    • E.

      Meningitis

    Correct Answer
    D. Monopegia
    Explanation
    Monopegia refers to the medical condition in which a patient experiences paralysis in only one limb. This term is derived from the Greek words "mono," meaning one, and "pegia," meaning paralysis. Paraplegia refers to paralysis of both lower limbs, tetraplegia refers to paralysis of all four limbs, hemiplegia refers to paralysis on one side of the body, and meningitis is an inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord.

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  • 25. 

    The most common and significant insult to the brain and spinal cord is?

    • A.

      Hypoxia

    • B.

      C-spine injury

    • C.

      Reduced CSF

    • D.

      Meningitis

    Correct Answer
    A. Hypoxia
    Explanation
    Hypoxia refers to a condition where there is a decrease in the supply of oxygen to the brain and spinal cord. This lack of oxygen can cause significant damage to these vital organs. Hypoxia can occur due to various reasons such as respiratory failure, cardiac arrest, or severe blood loss. The brain and spinal cord are highly dependent on oxygen for their proper functioning, and any insult to their oxygen supply can result in serious consequences, including cell death and permanent neurological damage. Therefore, hypoxia is considered the most common and significant insult to the brain and spinal cord.

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  • 26. 

    Nerve cells can regenerate?

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    Nerve cells, also known as neurons, do not have the ability to regenerate in most cases. Unlike other cells in the body, such as skin cells or blood cells, nerve cells have limited regenerative capabilities. Once damaged or destroyed, nerve cells typically do not regenerate or replace themselves. This is why injuries or diseases that affect the nervous system, such as spinal cord injuries or neurodegenerative disorders, can result in permanent damage or loss of function.

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  • 27. 

    Irreversible brain damage will begin within?

    • A.

      3 to 4 min's

    • B.

      60 sec's

    • C.

      30 sec's

    • D.

      5 to 10 min's

    Correct Answer
    A. 3 to 4 min's
    Explanation
    Irreversible brain damage will begin within 3 to 4 minutes. This is because the brain requires a constant supply of oxygen and nutrients to function properly. If the brain is deprived of oxygen for an extended period of time, it can lead to irreversible damage to the brain cells. The longer the brain is without oxygen, the higher the chances of permanent brain damage. Therefore, it is crucial to provide immediate medical attention in cases of oxygen deprivation to prevent irreversible brain damage.

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  • 28. 

    Nerves in the spine can be described as the same consistency of tooth paste?

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    The statement is true because nerves in the spine can indeed be described as having a similar consistency to toothpaste. This comparison is often used to illustrate the soft and pliable nature of spinal nerves, which allows them to transmit electrical signals and facilitate communication between the brain and the rest of the body. Just like toothpaste can be squeezed and molded, spinal nerves can be compressed or stretched, which can result in various neurological symptoms if they are damaged or impinged upon.

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  • 29. 

    The brain is contained in the cranial vault inside the skull. What percentage of this space does it occupy? 

    • A.

      80%

    • B.

      70%

    • C.

      75%

    • D.

      76%

    • E.

      95%

    • F.

      90%

    Correct Answer
    A. 80%
    Explanation
    Reference: The rest of the space is filled by 12% blood vessels and 8% cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)

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  • 30. 

    Which part of the brain stem is a vital centre for the cardiac and respiratory system?

    • A.

      Medulla oblongata

    • B.

      Mid brain

    • C.

      Pons varolii

    Correct Answer
    A. Medulla oblongata
    Explanation
    The medulla oblongata is a vital center for the cardiac and respiratory system. It controls and regulates functions such as heart rate, blood pressure, and breathing. It receives sensory information from the body and sends motor signals to the muscles involved in respiration and heart function. Damage to the medulla oblongata can result in life-threatening complications, as it is responsible for maintaining the basic functions necessary for survival.

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  • 31. 

    Which nerve connects the brain and the heart? 

    • A.

      Vagus nerve

    • B.

      Phrenic nerve

    Correct Answer
    A. Vagus nerve
    Explanation
    The vagus nerve is the correct answer because it is the longest cranial nerve in the body and it connects the brain to various organs in the body, including the heart. It plays a crucial role in regulating heart rate, blood pressure, and other autonomic functions. The phrenic nerve, on the other hand, connects the diaphragm to the brain and is responsible for controlling breathing.

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  • 32. 

    Which nerve connects the diaphragm and the brain?

    • A.

      Phrenic nerve

    • B.

      Vagus nerve

    Correct Answer
    A. Phrenic nerve
    Explanation
    The phrenic nerve connects the diaphragm and the brain. It is responsible for controlling the movement of the diaphragm, which is the main muscle involved in breathing. The phrenic nerve originates from the cervical spine in the neck and travels down to the diaphragm. It carries signals from the brain to the diaphragm, allowing it to contract and relax, which enables us to breathe. The vagus nerve, on the other hand, is responsible for regulating various bodily functions, such as heart rate and digestion, but it does not directly connect the diaphragm and the brain.

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  • 33. 

    A condition called neuronopathy can reduce pain sensation a patient may be experiencing?

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Patients that are at high risk of this condition are patients with diabetes it can mask pain they are having e.g chest pain.

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  • 34. 

    Anatomy of a nerve cell. A is pointing to?

    • A.

      Dendrite

    • B.

      Cell body

    • C.

      Node of ranvier

    • D.

      Axon terminal

    • E.

      Schwann cell

    • F.

      Myelin sheath

    • G.

      Nucleus

    Correct Answer
    A. Dendrite
    Explanation
    A is pointing to the dendrite. The dendrite is a branch-like structure that extends from the cell body of a nerve cell. It receives signals from other nerve cells and carries them towards the cell body. The dendrite plays a crucial role in transmitting information within the nervous system.

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  • 35. 

    Anatomy of a nerve cell. B is pointing to?

    • A.

      Dendrite

    • B.

      Cell body

    • C.

      Node of ranvier

    • D.

      Axon terminal

    • E.

      Schwann cell

    • F.

      Myelin sheath

    • G.

      Nucleus

    Correct Answer
    B. Cell body
    Explanation
    The correct answer is the cell body. The cell body, also known as the soma, is the main part of a nerve cell that contains the nucleus and other organelles. It is responsible for maintaining the overall function and metabolism of the cell, including protein synthesis and energy production. The cell body also receives signals from the dendrites and integrates them before sending out signals through the axon to other neurons or effector cells.

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  • 36. 

    Anatomy of a nerve cell. C is pointing to?

    • A.

      Dendrite

    • B.

      Cell body

    • C.

      Node of ranvier

    • D.

      Axon terminal

    • E.

      Schwann cell

    • F.

      Myelin sheath

    • G.

      Nucleus

    Correct Answer
    C. Node of ranvier
    Explanation
    Node of Ranvier is the correct answer because it is the small gap in the myelin sheath of a nerve cell where the axon is exposed. These nodes are important for the conduction of nerve impulses as they allow for the saltatory conduction, which means that the electrical signal jumps from one node to another, speeding up the transmission of the signal along the axon.

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  • 37. 

    Anatomy of a nerve cell. D is pointing to?

    • A.

      Dendrite

    • B.

      Cell body

    • C.

      Node of ranvier

    • D.

      Axon terminal

    • E.

      Schwann cell

    • F.

      Myelin sheath

    • G.

      Nucleus

    Correct Answer
    D. Axon terminal
    Explanation
    D is pointing to the axon terminal. The axon terminal is the end of the axon where it forms a synapse with another neuron or a target cell. It is responsible for transmitting the electrical signals from the neuron to the target cell.

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  • 38. 

    Anatomy of a nerve cell. E is pointing to?

    • A.

      Dendrite

    • B.

      Cell body

    • C.

      Node of ranvier

    • D.

      Axon terminal

    • E.

      Schwann cell

    • F.

      Myelin sheath

    • G.

      Nucleus

    Correct Answer
    E. Schwann cell
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Schwann cell. Schwann cells are a type of glial cell that wrap around the axon of a nerve cell to form the myelin sheath, which acts as an insulating layer. They play a crucial role in the functioning of the nervous system by providing support and protection to nerve fibers. In the given anatomy of a nerve cell, E is pointing to the Schwann cell.

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  • 39. 

    Anatomy of a nerve cell. F is pointing to?

    • A.

      Dendrite

    • B.

      Cell body

    • C.

      Node of ranvier

    • D.

      Axon terminal

    • E.

      Schwann cell

    • F.

      Myelin sheath

    • G.

      Nucleus

    Correct Answer
    F. Myelin sheath
    Explanation
    F is pointing to the myelin sheath. The myelin sheath is a protective covering that surrounds the axon of a nerve cell. It is made up of Schwann cells, which wrap around the axon multiple times, forming a layered structure. The myelin sheath acts as an insulator, allowing for faster transmission of electrical signals along the axon. It helps to protect the axon and maintain the integrity of the nerve cell.

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  • 40. 

    Anatomy of a nerve cell. G is pointing to?

    • A.

      Dendrite

    • B.

      Cell body

    • C.

      Node of ranvier

    • D.

      Axon terminal

    • E.

      Schwann cell

    • F.

      Myelin sheath

    • G.

      Nucleus

    Correct Answer
    G. Nucleus
    Explanation
    The correct answer is nucleus. The question is asking for the structure that G is pointing to in the anatomy of a nerve cell. Among the given options, the nucleus is the most likely structure that G is pointing to. The nucleus is typically located in the cell body of a nerve cell and contains the genetic material of the cell. It plays a crucial role in controlling the cell's activities and functions.

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  • 41. 

    In this picture of two nerve cells meeting 1 is pointing to?

    • A.

      Mitochondria

    • B.

      Synaptic vesicle

    • C.

      Auto receptor feedback

    • D.

      Synaptic cleft

    • E.

      Neurotransmitter receptor

    • F.

      Calcium ion channel

    • G.

      Neurotransmitter

    Correct Answer
    A. Mitochondria
    Explanation
    The correct answer is mitochondria. Mitochondria are often referred to as the "powerhouses" of the cell because they generate most of the cell's supply of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which is used as a source of energy. In nerve cells, mitochondria are particularly important because they require a lot of energy to function properly. They are involved in various cellular processes, including the production of neurotransmitters, maintenance of ion gradients, and overall cellular metabolism.

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  • 42. 

    In this picture of two nerve cells meeting 2 is pointing to?

    • A.

      Mitochondria

    • B.

      Synaptic vesicle

    • C.

      Auto receptor feedback

    • D.

      Synaptic cleft

    • E.

      Neurotransmitter receptor

    • F.

      Calcium ion channel

    • G.

      Neurotransmitter

    Correct Answer
    G. Neurotransmitter
    Explanation
    In the given picture, the number 2 is pointing to a structure that is responsible for transmitting signals between nerve cells, known as a neurotransmitter. Neurotransmitters are chemicals that are released from the presynaptic neuron into the synaptic cleft, where they bind to neurotransmitter receptors on the postsynaptic neuron, allowing for the transmission of signals. Therefore, the correct answer is neurotransmitter.

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  • 43. 

    In this picture of two nerve cells meeting 3 is pointing to?

    • A.

      Mitochondria

    • B.

      Synaptic vesicle

    • C.

      Auto receptor

    • D.

      Synaptic cleft

    • E.

      Neurotransmitter receptor

    • F.

      Calcium ion channel

    • G.

      Neurotransmitter

    Correct Answer
    C. Auto receptor
    Explanation
    An auto receptor is a type of receptor located on the presynaptic neuron that detects the release of neurotransmitters. When neurotransmitters are released into the synaptic cleft, they bind to auto receptors, which then regulate the further release of neurotransmitters. In the given picture, the arrow pointing to "3" is likely indicating the location of an auto receptor on one of the nerve cells.

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  • 44. 

    In this picture of two nerve cells meeting 4 is pointing to?

    • A.

      Mitochondria

    • B.

      Synaptic vesicle

    • C.

      Auto receptor

    • D.

      Synaptic cleft

    • E.

      Neurotransmitter receptor

    • F.

      Calcium ion channel

    • G.

      Neurotransmitter

    Correct Answer
    D. Synaptic cleft
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Synaptic cleft." In this picture, the number 4 is pointing to the space between the two nerve cells, which is known as the synaptic cleft. The synaptic cleft is the gap between the presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons, where neurotransmitters are released and received to transmit signals between the cells.

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  • 45. 

    In this picture of two nerve cells meeting 6 is pointing to?

    • A.

      Mitochondria

    • B.

      Synaptic vesicle

    • C.

      Auto receptor

    • D.

      Synaptic cleft

    • E.

      Neurotransmitter receptor

    • F.

      Calcium ion channel

    • G.

      Neurotransmitter

    Correct Answer
    F. Calcium ion channel
    Explanation
    In this picture, the number 6 is pointing to a calcium ion channel. Calcium ion channels play a crucial role in the communication between nerve cells. They allow calcium ions to enter the cell, which triggers the release of neurotransmitters from synaptic vesicles. This release of neurotransmitters is essential for the transmission of signals between nerve cells.

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  • 46. 

    A is pointing at?

    • A.

      Spinal cord

    • B.

      Cauda equina

    • C.

      Sciatic nerve

    Correct Answer
    A. Spinal cord
    Explanation
    The question is asking what A is pointing at. The correct answer is "Spinal cord". This suggests that A is indicating the location of the spinal cord.

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  • 47. 

    B is pointing at?

    • A.

      Spinal cord

    • B.

      Cauda equina

    • C.

      Sciatic nerve

    Correct Answer
    B. Cauda equina
    Explanation
    B is pointing at the cauda equina. The cauda equina is a bundle of nerves located at the lower end of the spinal cord. It resembles a horse's tail, hence the name "cauda equina" which means "horse's tail" in Latin. The cauda equina is responsible for transmitting nerve signals to and from the lower limbs and pelvic organs. It is formed by the spinal nerves that continue beyond the end of the spinal cord, branching out to innervate the lower body.

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  • 48. 

    C is pointing at?

    • A.

      Spinal cord

    • B.

      Cauda equina

    • C.

      Sciatic nerve

    Correct Answer
    C. Sciatic nerve
    Explanation
    C is pointing at the sciatic nerve. The sciatic nerve is the largest nerve in the body and runs from the lower back down the back of the leg. It is responsible for providing sensation and motor function to the leg and foot. In the given options, the sciatic nerve is the most relevant structure that C could be pointing at, as both the spinal cord and cauda equina are located higher up in the body and do not extend down the leg.

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  • 49. 

    Transmission of neurotransmitters (2) between the synapse (4) of nerve cells is by?

    • A.

      Chemical reaction

    • B.

      Electrical impulses

    Correct Answer
    A. Chemical reaction
    Explanation
    Neurotransmitters are chemicals that transmit signals between nerve cells in the synapse. They are released from the presynaptic neuron and bind to receptors on the postsynaptic neuron, allowing the transmission of signals. This process involves a chemical reaction, as the neurotransmitters are released into the synapse and interact with the receptors on the postsynaptic neuron. Electrical impulses, on the other hand, are involved in the generation and propagation of signals within individual neurons, but they are not directly responsible for the transmission of neurotransmitters between synapses.

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  • 50. 

    Question from: Tortora Principles of Anatomy and Physiology 12 editionQ: CSF contributes to homeostasis in how many ways?

    • A.

      3

    • B.

      2

    • C.

      1

    • D.

      4

    Correct Answer
    A. 3
    Explanation
    Answer on page 500

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  • Current Version
  • Jan 22, 2024
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Mar 03, 2014
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    AmbulanceCPD
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