E-learning Neuroanatomy Quiz Questions

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E-learning Neuroanatomy Quiz Questions - Quiz

Membrane Potentials, action potentials, synaptic potentials, neurotransmitters, neurons clinical neurology: Let's take this quiz now!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    The four lobes found within the brain are:

    • A.

      Frontal, Parietal, Occipital, Temporal

    Correct Answer
    A. Frontal, Parietal, Occipital, Temporal
    Explanation
    The four lobes found within the brain are the frontal lobe, which is responsible for decision-making and personality; the parietal lobe, which processes sensory information; the occipital lobe, which is involved in visual processing; and the temporal lobe, which is responsible for auditory processing and memory. These lobes work together to control various functions and processes within the brain, allowing us to perceive and interact with the world around us.

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  • 2. 

    Which of the following listed are the 4 major arteries that supply the brain.

    • A.

      MCA, PCA, PAD, RCA

    • B.

      PAD, RCA, MCA, RSS

    • C.

      ACA, MCA, PCA, PAD

    • D.

      PCA, PAD, AAR, RSS

    Correct Answer
    C. ACA, MCA, PCA, PAD
    Explanation
    The correct answer is ACA, MCA, PCA, PAD. These are the four major arteries that supply the brain. The Anterior Cerebral Artery (ACA) supplies the front and middle parts of the brain. The Middle Cerebral Artery (MCA) supplies the lateral surfaces of the brain, including the motor and sensory areas. The Posterior Cerebral Artery (PCA) supplies the occipital lobe and the inferior and medial surfaces of the temporal lobe. The Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery (PAD) supplies the cerebellum and the posterior part of the brainstem.

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  • 3. 

    The ACA is a major arterial blood supply to the brain. What does ACA stand for?

    • A.

      Anterior Cerebral Artery

    • B.

      Anterial Cerebellar Artery

    • C.

      Arterial Cerebral Artery

    • D.

      Arterial Cerebellar Artery

    Correct Answer
    A. Anterior Cerebral Artery
    Explanation
    The ACA stands for Anterior Cerebral Artery. This artery is a major blood supply to the brain.

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  • 4. 

    Which artery supplies the posterior portion of the brain?

    • A.

      Internal Carotid Artery

    • B.

      Vertebral Artery

    • C.

      Anterior Cerebral Artery

    • D.

      Anterior Cerebellar Artery

    • E.

      Posterior Cerebral Artery

    Correct Answer
    B. Vertebral Artery
    Explanation
    The vertebral artery supplies the posterior portion of the brain. It is one of the major arteries that branches off from the subclavian artery and enters the skull through the foramen magnum. It then joins with the contralateral vertebral artery to form the basilar artery, which supplies blood to the posterior circulation of the brain. The posterior portion of the brain includes structures such as the cerebellum and the brainstem, which are crucial for motor coordination and vital functions.

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  • 5. 

    A blockage of this artery can casue weakness and loss of sensation to the Left side of the body.

    • A.

      Vertebral Artery

    • B.

      Anterior Cerebral Artery

    • C.

      Middle Cerebral Artery

    • D.

      Internal Carotid Artery

    • E.

      Posterior Cerebral Artery

    Correct Answer
    D. Internal Carotid Artery
    Explanation
    The internal carotid artery supplies blood to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres. A blockage in this artery can lead to a lack of blood flow to the left side of the brain, resulting in weakness and loss of sensation on the left side of the body. The other arteries listed do not supply blood to the entire brain or specifically to the left side of the body.

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  • 6. 

    An obstruction of this artery causes visual abnormalities such as: visual loss, dizzyness, etc. This artery corresponds with the visual centers of the cerebrum, the brain stem, and cerebellum.

    • A.

      Internal Carotid Artery

    • B.

      Anterior Cerebral Artery

    • C.

      Middle Cerebral Artery

    • D.

      Vertebral Artery

    • E.

      Posterior Cerebral Artery

    Correct Answer
    D. Vertebral Artery
    Explanation
    An obstruction of the Vertebral Artery can cause visual abnormalities such as visual loss and dizziness. This artery is responsible for supplying blood to the visual centers of the cerebrum, brain stem, and cerebellum.

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  • 7. 

    Which series of arteries supply the cerebellum and brainstem?

    • A.

      The Posterior, Anterior, and Middle cerebral Arteries

    • B.

      The Superior, Anterior, and Posteroir Cerebellar Arteries

    Correct Answer
    B. The Superior, Anterior, and Posteroir Cerebellar Arteries
    Explanation
    The correct answer is the Superior, Anterior, and Posterior Cerebellar Arteries. These arteries are responsible for supplying blood to the cerebellum and brainstem. The Superior Cerebellar Artery supplies the upper part of the cerebellum, the Anterior Cerebellar Artery supplies the anterior part, and the Posterior Cerebellar Artery supplies the posterior part. Together, these arteries ensure that the cerebellum and brainstem receive the necessary oxygen and nutrients for proper functioning.

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  • 8. 

    What is the name of the structure within the walls of each ventricle that secretes the clear colorless CSF fluids.

    • A.

      Foramen of Luschka

    • B.

      Subachnoid space

    • C.

      Choroid plexus

    • D.

      Cavernous sinus

    • E.

      Superior Saggital sinus

    Correct Answer
    C. Choroid plexus
    Explanation
    The choroid plexus is the structure within the walls of each ventricle that secretes the clear colorless CSF fluid. It is responsible for producing and regulating the cerebrospinal fluid, which provides cushioning and support to the brain and spinal cord. The CSF fluid also helps in removing waste products and supplying nutrients to the central nervous system.

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  • 9. 

    A spinal tap is given in this special subarachnoid space (cistern).

    • A.

      L2/S2

    • B.

      L4/S1

    • C.

      L3/S1

    • D.

      L2/S1

    • E.

      L5/S2

    Correct Answer
    A. L2/S2
    Explanation
    The answer is L2/S2 because the spinal tap is given in the special subarachnoid space called the cistern, which is located between the second lumbar vertebra (L2) and the second sacral vertebra (S2).

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  • 10. 

    An occlusion in which area of the Cirle of Willis will result in total unilateral blindness.

    • A.

      Internal Carotid Artery

    • B.

      Opthalmic Artery

    • C.

      Occulomotor Artery

    • D.

      Optic Chiasm

    • E.

      Middle Cerebral Artery

    Correct Answer
    B. Opthalmic Artery
    Explanation
    The opthalmic artery is a branch of the internal carotid artery.

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  • 11. 

    Which four cranial nerves contain both sensory and motor functions?

    • A.

      Occulomotor, facial, hypoglossal, optic

    • B.

      Facial, trigeminal, vagus, abducens

    • C.

      Facial, glossopharyngeal, spinal accessory, vagus

    • D.

      Vagus, glossopharyngeal, facial, trigeminal

    • E.

      Olfactory, optic, auditory, facial

    Correct Answer
    D. Vagus, glossopharyngeal, facial, trigeminal
    Explanation
    The four cranial nerves that contain both sensory and motor functions are the vagus, glossopharyngeal, facial, and trigeminal nerves. These nerves are responsible for both transmitting sensory information from various parts of the head and face to the brain, as well as controlling the motor functions of certain muscles in these areas.

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  • 12. 

    What are the three cranial nerves that contain only sensory functions?

    • A.

      Hypoglossal, auditory, optic

    • B.

      Optic, olfactory, auditory

    • C.

      Auditory, optic, vagus

    • D.

      Occulomotor, trigeminal, hypoglossal

    • E.

      Facial, optic, glossopharyngeal

    Correct Answer
    B. Optic, olfactory, auditory
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Optic, olfactory, auditory." These three cranial nerves are responsible for sensory functions. The optic nerve is responsible for vision, the olfactory nerve is responsible for smell, and the auditory nerve is responsible for hearing.

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  • 13. 

    Which two motor nerves have the functionability to move the eye laterally?

    • A.

      Optic and abducens

    • B.

      Occulomotor and vagus

    • C.

      Optic and occulomotor

    • D.

      Occulomotor and abducens

    • E.

      Trochlear and abducens

    Correct Answer
    E. Trochlear and abducens
    Explanation
    The trochlear and abducens nerves are responsible for moving the eye laterally. The trochlear nerve controls the superior oblique muscle, which helps to rotate the eye downward and outward. The abducens nerve controls the lateral rectus muscle, which moves the eye outward. Therefore, these two motor nerves work together to allow for lateral movement of the eye.

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  • 14. 

    The glossopharyngeal nerve contains both sensory and motor functions?

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    The glossopharyngeal nerve is a mixed nerve that contains both sensory and motor functions. It carries sensory information from the back of the tongue, throat, and parts of the ear, as well as taste sensations from the posterior third of the tongue. Additionally, it also controls certain muscles involved in swallowing and speech. Therefore, the statement that the glossopharyngeal nerve contains both sensory and motor functions is true.

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  • 15. 

    The abducens nerve turns the eye laterally and is a sensory nerve.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    The abducens nerve, also known as cranial nerve VI, is responsible for controlling the movement of the eye laterally, towards the side. It is a motor nerve, not a sensory nerve. Therefore, the given statement is incorrect and the correct answer is False.

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  • 16. 

    The olfactory and optic nerves are cranial nerves one and two.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    The olfactory and optic nerves are indeed cranial nerves one and two. The olfactory nerve is responsible for our sense of smell, while the optic nerve is responsible for transmitting visual information from the eyes to the brain. As cranial nerves, they originate from the brain and play crucial roles in our sensory perception.

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  • 17. 

    The facial, glossopharyngeal, and vagus nerve are three nerves involved in both sensory and motor functions.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    The facial, glossopharyngeal, and vagus nerves are indeed involved in both sensory and motor functions. These three cranial nerves are responsible for carrying sensory information from various parts of the head and neck to the brain, as well as controlling the movement of muscles in these areas. They play important roles in functions such as facial expression, taste, swallowing, and vocalization. Therefore, the statement is true.

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  • 18. 

    Visual agnosia is the failure to uinderstand the meaning or use of an object. A lesion in the _______ lobe could cause such a condition.

    • A.

      Frontal

    • B.

      Parietal

    • C.

      Occipital

    • D.

      Temporal

    • E.

      Parieto-Occipital

    Correct Answer
    C. Occipital
    Explanation
    Visual agnosia is the failure to understand the meaning or use of an object. The occipital lobe is responsible for processing visual information, so a lesion in the occipital lobe could disrupt this processing and result in visual agnosia.

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  • 19. 

    Speech aphasia, where the formulation of words are normal but the use of words is inappropriate is caused by a lesion of __________ area in the _______ lobe.

    • A.

      Wernicke's; Parietal

    • B.

      Wernicke's; Temporal

    • C.

      Wernicke's; Parieto-Temporal

    • D.

      Broca's; Frontal

    • E.

      Broca's; Temporal

    Correct Answer
    B. Wernicke's; Temporal
    Explanation
    Speech aphasia, where the formulation of words are normal but the use of words is inappropriate, is caused by a lesion of Wernicke's area in the temporal lobe. Wernicke's area is responsible for language comprehension and the production of meaningful speech. When this area is damaged, individuals may have difficulty understanding and using words correctly, leading to the symptoms of speech aphasia. The temporal lobe is involved in auditory processing and plays a crucial role in language comprehension, making it the likely location for the lesion causing this type of aphasia.

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  • 20. 

    The three layers that make up the meninges covering the brain inferiorly to superiorly are called __________, _____________, and _________.

    • A.

      Arachnoid, Dura, Pia

    • B.

      Dura, Pia, Arachnoid

    • C.

      Pia, Arachnoid, Dura

    • D.

      Dura, Arachnoid, Pia

    • E.

      Arachnoid, Pia, Dura

    Correct Answer
    D. Dura, Arachnoid, Pia
    Explanation
    The three layers that make up the meninges covering the brain are the Dura, Arachnoid, and Pia. The Dura is the outermost layer, followed by the Arachnoid, and then the Pia is the innermost layer.

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  • 21. 

    The brain recieves its' arterial blood supply from two pairs of arteries, the ______________ and _______________.

    • A.

      Vertebral, Middle Cerebral

    • B.

      Internal Carotid, Anterior Cerebral

    • C.

      Middle Cerebral, Internal Carotid

    • D.

      Internal Carotid; Vertebral

    • E.

      Middle Cerebral, Anterior Cerebral

    Correct Answer
    D. Internal Carotid; Vertebral
    Explanation
    The brain receives its arterial blood supply from two pairs of arteries, the internal carotid and vertebral arteries. The internal carotid arteries supply blood to the anterior part of the brain, while the vertebral arteries supply blood to the posterior part of the brain. Together, these arteries ensure that the brain receives a constant supply of oxygen and nutrients necessary for its proper functioning.

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  • 22. 

    The internal carotid artery breaks down into smaller branches of arteries called the _____________________.

    • A.

      Anterior Cerebral Artery

    • B.

      Inferior Cerebral Artery

    • C.

      Vertebral Artery

    • D.

      Inferior Carotid Artery

    • E.

      Posterior Cerebral Artery

    Correct Answer
    A. Anterior Cerebral Artery
    Explanation
    The internal carotid artery is one of the main arteries that supplies blood to the brain. It branches out into smaller arteries, and one of these branches is called the anterior cerebral artery. This artery is responsible for supplying blood to the frontal lobes and the medial surfaces of the brain. Therefore, the correct answer is the anterior cerebral artery.

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  • Current Version
  • Mar 21, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • May 30, 2008
    Quiz Created by
    Teal Schultz
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