Logic Chapter 4

34 Questions | Total Attempts: 189

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Logic Quizzes & Trivia

This is based off of Concise Introduction to Logic 10th editionby Patrick J Hurley


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    A proposition that relates two classes (or categories)
  • 2. 
    (1) An "if . . . then' statement(2) a statement having a horseshoe as its main operator
  • 3. 
    Valid from the Aristotelian standpoint on condition that the subject term of the premise (or premises) denotes actually existing things
  • 4. 
    The relation that exists between statements that necessarily have opposite truth values
  • 5. 
    Statements that necessarily have opposite truth values
  • 6. 
    An operation that consists in switching the subject and predicate terms in a standard-form categorical proposition and replacing each with its term complement
  • 7. 
    The relation that exists between two statements that are necessarily not both true
  • 8. 
    In standard-form categorical propositions, the words "are' and "are not
  • 9. 
    A categorical proposition having the form "No S are P'
  • 10. 
    A categorical proposition having the form "Some S are P'
  • 11. 
    A formal fallacy that occurs when the conclusion of an argument depends on the contraposition of an E or I statement
  • 12. 
    A formal fallacy that occurs when the conclusion of an argument depends on an incorrect application of the contrary relation
  • 13. 
    A formal fallacy that occurs when the conclusion of an argument depends on the conversion of an A or O statement
  • 14. 
    A formal fallacy that occurs when the conclusion of an argument depends on an incorrect application of the subalternation relation
  • 15. 
    A formal fallacy that occurs when the conclusion of an argument depends on an incorrect application of the subcontrary relation
  • 16. 
    An argument having a single premise
  • 17. 
    A condition that exists when a certain statement is not necessarily either true or false, given the truth value of some related statement
  • 18. 
    A diagram that illustrates the necessary relations that prevail between the four kinds of standard-form categorical propositions as interpreted from the Boolean standpoint
  • 19. 
    A statement that denies class membership
  • 20. 
    A categorical proposition having the form "Some S are not P'
  • 21. 
    A phrase that, when introduced into a statement, affects the form but not the meaning
  • 22. 
    A statement that makes a claim about one or more (but not all) members of a class
  • 23. 
    In a standard-form categorical proposition, the term that comes immediately after the copula
  • 24. 
    The attribute of a categorical proposition by which it is either affirmative or negative
  • 25. 
    The attribute of a categorical proposition by which it is either universal or particular
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