The Canadian Law Quiz! Trivia Questions

14 Questions | Total Attempts: 62

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The Canadian Law Quiz! Trivia Questions

Welcome to The Canadian Law Quiz. The laws in Canada are divided into private and public law. And the government is controlled by public laws. Did you know that only the Canadian Federal Government can make criminal law? How many regulations do you think have been changed since the construction of the constitution? This quiz will help you learn more about the constitution and how the laws are implemented.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    What started codification?
    • A. 

      Rule of Law

    • B. 

      Mosaic Law

    • C. 

      10 Commandments

    • D. 

      Code of Hammurabi

    • E. 

      Stare Decisis

  • 2. 
    Smith et al. v. Doe (2008) Ont. C.A. 15 C.C.L.T. (2d) 391 - what does the 'C.C.L.T.' represent?
    • A. 

      The provincial court

    • B. 

      The plaintiff

    • C. 

      The bailiff

    • D. 

      The edition title

    • E. 

      The report title

  • 3. 
    Who can be charged in a crime?
    • A. 

      The Justice

    • B. 

      The juror

    • C. 

      The defendant

    • D. 

      The principal actor

    • E. 

      The mens rea

  • 4. 
    What does Section 33 describe?
    • A. 

      Feudalism

    • B. 

      Notwithstanding clause

    • C. 

      Writ of Habeas Corpus

    • D. 

      Actus Reus

    • E. 

      Precedent

  • 5. 
    What is the definition of entrenched?
    • A. 

      A provision making a law valid, even though it contradicts some other law

    • B. 

      Putting off to another time

    • C. 

      Wrongfully accusing an innocent person

    • D. 

      A right that can only be changed by an amendment to the Constitution

    • E. 

      Not telling the truth while in court

  • 6. 
    What is the Magna Carta?
    • A. 

      Bill that makes it mandatory to put signs in only French

    • B. 

      A breach of contract in which the injured party seeks compensation

    • C. 

      The charter that limited the King’s ruling power and made all rulers subject to the law

    • D. 

      Laws developed by Napoleon Bonaparte from Justinian Law

    • E. 

      A statute

  • 7. 
    What are the two main types of law?
    • A. 

      Public and Private

    • B. 

      Guilty and Innocent

    • C. 

      Administrative and Constitutional

    • D. 

      Civil and Criminal

    • E. 

      Summary and Indictable

  • 8. 
    Everyone has the right not to be arbitrarily detained or imprisoned according to what section of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms?
    • A. 

      2

    • B. 

      9

    • C. 

      33

    • D. 

      15

    • E. 

      9

  • 9. 
    What is Stare Decisis?
    • A. 

      Guilty mind

    • B. 

      Wrongful Action

    • C. 

      Precedent

    • D. 

      Plaintiff

    • E. 

      Charter

  • 10. 
    What is 'an eye for an eye'?
    • A. 

      Retribution

    • B. 

      Restitution

    • C. 

      Tort Law

    • D. 

      Conspiracy

    • E. 

      Defendant

  • 11. 
    When was the Charter of Rights and Freedoms signed?
    • A. 

      3800 years ago

    • B. 

      1984

    • C. 

      1982

    • D. 

      2001

    • E. 

      2012

  • 12. 
    What does specific intent require that general intent does not?
    • A. 

      Mens Rea

    • B. 

      Actus Reus

    • C. 

      Veni, Vidi, Vici

    • D. 

      Carpe diem

    • E. 

      Voir Dire

  • 13. 
    What is recognizance without surety?
    • A. 

      A document signed by a person acknowledging that he or she is alleged to have committed an offense, and will be required to appear in court; payment is made by another person on behalf of the accused

    • B. 

      A document signed by a person acknowledging that he or she is alleged to have committed an offense, and will be required to appear in court; payment is made by the accused

    • C. 

      Process in which the Crown and the accused ‘makes a deal’, usually resulting in the accused pleading guilty to a lesser charge in return for a lower penalty than would be received if found guilty of the original charge

    • D. 

      (1) something planned or intended; intentionally causing a wrongful consequence; (2) a person’s state of mind, in which the person desires to carry out a certain action and can foresee the results

    • E. 

      Lawyer who is on duty at a police station, or court room, to give legal advice to those arrested or brought before a trial

  • 14. 
    Define prejudice
    • A. 

      The accused in public law

    • B. 

      Preconceived opinion

    • C. 

      Written laws formally passed by municipality

    • D. 

      To encourage, incite, or set on another on to commit a crime

    • E. 

      Rationale for committing an offense

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