Trivia Quiz On Effective Argumentation!

42 Questions | Total Attempts: 66

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Trivia Quiz On Effective Argumentation!

Most people do not like to lose or know that they are wrong, and this is one of the reasons why people get into arguments. Arguments are not meant to be won but to pass a point across and come to a common solution. Do you know how to avoid arguments from escalating and ensure you get results? Take up this quiz and get to find out!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Argumentation is
    • A. 

      The thinking we use to analyze what we read, see, and hear in order to arrive at a justified conclusion.

    • B. 

      The way we advocate proposals, examine competing ideas, and influence one another.

    • C. 

      A hostile confrontation between two or more people.

    • D. 

      A form of debating in which a judge makes the final decision.

    • E. 

       a claim supported by evidence and reasons for accepting it.

  • 2. 
    An argument is
    • A. 

       the thinking we use to analyze what we read, see and hear in order to arrive at a justified conclusion.

    • B. 

      The way in which we use critical thinking to advocate proposals, examine competing ideas, and influence one another.

    • C. 

      A hostile confrontation between two or more people.

    • D. 

      A form of debating in which a judge makes the final decision.

    • E. 

      A claim supported by evidence and reasons for accepting it.

  • 3. 
    Effective argumentation in groups
    • A. 

      Promotes misunderstanding.

    • B. 

      Promotes critical thinking.

    • C. 

      Prevents persuasion.

    • D. 

      Promotes groupthink.

    • E. 

       promotes hostility.

  • 4. 
    Argumentativeness is a
    • A. 

      Claim supported by evidence and reasons for accepting it.

    • B. 

      Process of reasoned interaction intended to help participants make the best decision in a given situation.

    • C. 

      Decision based on listening to and analyzing arguments.

    • D. 

      Willingness to argue about controversial issues with others.

    • E. 

       form of debating in which a judge makes the final decision.

  • 5. 
    All of the following traits characterize highly argumentative group members EXCEPT
    • A. 

      They promote hostility in the group.

    • B. 

      They show genuine interest in the group's discussions.

    • C. 

      They focus on issues rather than personalities.

    • D. 

       they are often chosen as group leaders.

    • E. 

      They are viewed as highly credible members.

  • 6. 
    . Which of the following statements best describes a highly argumentative group member?
    • A. 

      The member is not confrontational.

    • B. 

      The member has less influence in group decision making.

    • C. 

      The member is less likely to be persuaded by others.

    • D. 

      The member is less likely to be chosen as the group leader.

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 7. 
    . Which component of the Toulmin Model of Argument explains why the evidence supports the claim?
    • A. 

      Qualifier

    • B. 

      Evidence

    • C. 

      Warrant

    • D. 

      Backing

    • E. 

      Reservation

  • 8. 
    The warrant in an argument answers the question
    • A. 

       What makes you say that?

    • B. 

       What do you have to go on?

    • C. 

      How did you get there?

    • D. 

      Are there any exceptions?

    • E. 

       What conclusion or position do you advocate

  • 9. 
    Which component of the Toulmin Model of Argument is represented in Part I of the following argument? I. Joan would be a good leader. / II. Good leaders are effective communicators. / III. Joan got an A in the communication course she took.
    • A. 

      Claim

    • B. 

      Evidence

    • C. 

      Warrant

    • D. 

      Backing

    • E. 

      Reservation

  • 10. 
    . Which component of the Toulmin Model of Argument is represented in Part II of the following argument? I. Joan would be a good leader. / II. Good leaders are effective communicators. / III. Joan got an A in the communication course she took.
    • A. 

      Claim

    • B. 

      Evidence

    • C. 

      Warrant

    • D. 

       backing

    • E. 

       reservation

  • 11. 
    Which component of the Toulmin Model of Argument is represented in Part III of the following argument? I. Joan would be a good leader. / II. Good leaders are effective communicators. / III. Joan got an A in the communication course she took.
    • A. 

      A. claim

    • B. 

      B. evidence

    • C. 

      C. warrant

    • D. 

      D. qualifier

    • E. 

      E. reservation

  • 12. 
    Which component of the Toulmin Model of Argument is indicated by words in a claim such as "likely," "possibly," or "probably"?
    • A. 

      A. reservation

    • B. 

      B. evidence

    • C. 

      C. data

    • D. 

      D. qualifier

    • E. 

      E. warrant

  • 13. 
    Which of the following answers is an example of the kind of evidence you could use in an argument?
    • A. 

      A. facts and opinions

    • B. 

      B. definitions and descriptions

    • C. 

      C. examples and illustrations

    • D. 

      D. statistics

    • E. 

      E. all of the above

  • 14. 
    "More than 40% of American claim to have read The da Vinci Code.” What type of evidence is used in this example?
    • A. 

      A. testimony

    • B. 

      B. definition

    • C. 

      C. statistic

    • D. 

      D. story

    • E. 

      E. opinion

  • 15. 
    "The Biltmore Mansion is the largest private residence in the United States." What type of evidence is used in this example?
    • A. 

      A. fact

    • B. 

      B. description

    • C. 

      C. opinion

    • D. 

      D. definition

    • E. 

      E. example

  • 16. 
    . "Sufism is not a sect of Islam, like Shiism or Shunnism, but rather the mystical sides of Islam: a personal, experiential approach to Allah, which contrasts with the more prescriptive, doctrinal approach of fundamentalism like the Taliban." What type of evidence is used in this example?
    • A. 

      A. definition

    • B. 

      B. illustration

    • C. 

      C. fact

    • D. 

      D. description

    • E. 

      E. statistic

  • 17. 
    The Wings of Freedom tour includes 3 famous World War II vintage airplanes: a B-17 Flying Fortress, a B-24 Liberator, and a North American P-51. What type of evidence is used in this example?
    • A. 

      A. definition

    • B. 

      B. opinion

    • C. 

      C. statistic

    • D. 

      D. illustration

    • E. 

      E. example

  • 18. 
    "Horsepower is a unit for measuring the power of engines roughly equal to 746 watts or 33,000 foot-pounds per minute. " What type of evidence is used in this example?
    • A. 

      A. example

    • B. 

      B. definition

    • C. 

      C. illustration

    • D. 

      D. opinion

    • E. 

      E. statistic

  • 19. 
    The president and chief executive of a virtual web space in which users can share comments claims that "The best innovations occur when you have networks of people with diverse backgrounds gathering around a problem." What type of evidence is used in this example?
    • A. 

      A. fact

    • B. 

      B. statistic

    • C. 

      C. illustration

    • D. 

      D. opinion

    • E. 

      E. example

  • 20. 
    "According to NORML (National Organization to Reform Marijuana Laws), marijuana is a harmless drug that has no long-term side effects." What criticism should be made about this piece of evidence?
    • A. 

      A. It's not recent.

    • B. 

      B. It's not statistically valid.

    • C. 

      C. It's biased.

    • D. 

      D. It's not identified.

    • E. 

      E. It's not consistent.

  • 21. 
    "According to a 1984 article in the Midland Times Herald, gang activity is not a significant problem in the community." What criticism should be made about this piece of evidence?
    • A. 

      A. It's not recent.

    • B. 

      B. It's not statistically valid.

    • C. 

      C. It's biased.

    • D. 

      D. It's not identified d. It's not identified

    • E. 

      E. It's not consistent.

  • 22. 
    . Paulo survived a car crash without any major injury while not wearing a seatbelt. If he uses this example to prove that seatbelts are not needed, he has failed to test his evidence for
    • A. 

      A. consistency.

    • B. 

      B. relevancy.

    • C. 

      C. recency.

    • D. 

      D. credibility.

    • E. 

      E. interest.

  • 23. 
    You should ask all of the following questions when trying to determine the objectivity or accuracy of evidence from an internet source EXCEPT
    • A. 

      A. Is statistical data well labeled and easy to read?

    • B. 

      B. Are the sources of information available so you can verify their claims?

    • C. 

      C. Does it account for opposing points of view?

    • D. 

      D. Is the information free of grammatical, spelling, and typographical errors that could indicate a lack of quality control?

    • E. 

      E. Do you agree with the source's claims and point of view?

  • 24. 
    "Sex education in schools promotes teenage promiscuity." This statement is an example of a claim of
    • A. 

      A. fact.

    • B. 

      B. conjecture.

    • C. 

      C. value.

    • D. 

      D. policy.

    • E. 

      E. fiction.

  • 25. 
     "Our town should enact a curfew for all juveniles." This statement is an example of
    • A. 

      A. fact.

    • B. 

      B. conjecture.

    • C. 

      C. policy.

    • D. 

      D. value.

    • E. 

      E. fiction.

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