An Argument? Or Not An Argument?

12 Questions | Total Attempts: 1055

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Argument Quizzes & Trivia

Read each statement, and then select A. If the statement is An Argument or B. If the statement is Not An Argument. An Argument is defined as a controversial statement, frequently called a claim, supported by evidence and a warrant. The standards of a logically good argument include acceptability, relevance, and sufficiency. Definition from www. Idebate. Org


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    People should ride bicycles more, because air pollution is really a problem in the city.
    • A. 

      An Argument.

    • B. 

      Not An Argument.

  • 2. 
    Survival is the most important and most highly respected human value.
    • A. 

      An Argument.

    • B. 

      Not An Argument.

  • 3. 
    Our awareness of environmental problems is increasing. Already we have reduced the emission of chemicals that destroy the ozone and have banned many pesticides.
    • A. 

      An Argument.

    • B. 

      Not An Argument.

  • 4. 
    My opponent argues that acid rain is destroying the environment, but that is an inaccurate, incomplete, and irrelevant argument.
    • A. 

      An Argument.

    • B. 

      Not An Argument.

  • 5. 
    Species loss is at a crisis level. Harvard Biologist Edward Wilson estimates that nearly 140 species are lost every day.
    • A. 

      An Argument

    • B. 

      Not an Argument

  • 6. 
    The most important action for any of us to take is to protect the environment. Please, take whatever action you can.
    • A. 

      An Argument.

    • B. 

      Not an Argument.

  • 7. 
    Since all pollution laws have economic consequences, we need to look at this law’s effect on the economy.
    • A. 

      An Argument.

    • B. 

      Not An Argument.

  • 8. 
    When a species loses its natural habitat, it is nearly impossible to prevent it from going extinct. There are only a few thousand Giant Panda, for instance, now that their habitat is taken over by development.
    • A. 

      An Argument.

    • B. 

      Not An Argument.

  • 9. 
    How can we wait, even a single day, to take action to protect the environment?
    • A. 

      An Argument.

    • B. 

      Not An Argument.

  • 10. 
    The move to a more ecological society will require big changes. The industrial revolution brought with it changes in government, family, and the economy. In the same way, the move to an ecological society will likewise require a fundamental change in our way of living.
    • A. 

      An Argument.

    • B. 

      Not An Argument.

  • 11. 
    The affirmative argues that global warming will destroy the world, but they don’t prove that because they present no evidence that global warming is happening in the first place.
    • A. 

      An Argument.

    • B. 

      Not An Argument.

  • 12. 
    The affirmative says that carbon dioxide is harmful to the environment. That is false.
    • A. 

      An Argument.

    • B. 

      Not An Argument.

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