Can You Guess The Philosopher Name?

50 Questions

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Philosophy Quizzes & Trivia

This quiz is a real test for those interested in philosophy, history, and literature. You have to guess the philosopher's name by the given quote or statement. This is going to be a long quiz, so get your cup of coffee and jump in the quiz!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    He emphasized nature and the natural way of doing things. Education should occur in a natural rather than artificial environment and should be a natural outgrowth of the child's development rather than a set of contrived experiences.
    • A. 

      Johann Henirich Pestalozzi

    • B. 

      Fredrich Froebel

    • C. 

      Johann Friedrich Herbart

    • D. 

      Maria Montessori

    • E. 

      Jean Jacques Rousseau

  • 2. 
    Human beings are by nature good but are corrupted by the institutions of "civilized" society.
    • A. 

      Johann Henirich Pestalozzi

    • B. 

      Fredrich Froebel

    • C. 

      Jean Jacques Rousseau

    • D. 

      Maria Montessori

    • E. 

      Johann Friedrich Herbart

  • 3. 
    Childhood is unlike adulthood and those differences should be allowed and encouraged. Children should not be expected to take on adult responsibilities or forced to live by adult standards. Childhood is a qualitatively distinct period of life for which special freedom and nurture should be provided.
    • A. 

      Johann Henirich Pestalozzi

    • B. 

      Jean Jacques Rousseau

    • C. 

      Johann Friedrich Herbart

    • D. 

      Maria Montessori

    • E. 

      Fredrich Froebel

  • 4. 
    Because the child is innately good and the teacher has been corrupted, the educational process should be child-centered, not content-centered or teacher-centered.
    • A. 

      Jean Jacques Rousseau

    • B. 

      Fredrich Froebel

    • C. 

      Johann Friedrich Herbart

    • D. 

      Maria Montessori

    • E. 

      Johann Henirich Pestalozzi

  • 5. 
    He believed that all mental activities were the result of interactions of numerous elementary ideas, rather than all concepts stemming from a one set of mental ideas which was the predominant view of that time.
    • A. 

      Maria Montessori

    • B. 

      Johann Friedrich Herbart

    • C. 

      Jean Jacques Rousseau

    • D. 

      Johann Henirich Pestalozzi

    • E. 

      Fredrich Froebel

  • 6. 
    Education should be "negative" or "subtractive." That is, the less the teacher interferes in the child's natural development, the better off the child will be. The teacher is a guide or facilitator, not an instructor.
    • A. 

      Johann Henirich Pestalozzi

    • B. 

      Fredrich Froebel

    • C. 

      Johann Friedrich Herbart

    • D. 

      Maria Montessori

    • E. 

      Jean Jacques Rousseau

  • 7. 
    Education should be informal. It should occur outside the school in the "real" world and should grow out of the experiences the child has on a day to day basis.
    • A. 

      Rousseau

    • B. 

      Pestalozzi

    • C. 

      Froebel

    • D. 

      Montessori

    • E. 

      Herbart

  • 8. 
    All his undertakings proved failures, and yet he is the most influential of modern educators. There was nothing attractive in his external appearance. He had read very few books, possessed neither philosophical  penetration nor mastery of method, and entirely lacked talent for organization. ...in spite of all these drawbacks, he exerted a profound influence on modern education was due chiefly to his self-sacrificing love for children, and his enthusiasm for educational work.
  • 9. 
    The object lesson, invented by this educator, is the core of his whole system, and exercises are based more on the study of objects than of words.
  • 10. 
    The ideas of the educator, stripped of their eccentricities by his disciples, became prominent features in modern education.
  • 11. 
    Promoted the making of education accessible to the poor, not only by providing schools but by teaching subjects in those schools that were interesting to and valued by common folk. He desired to get away from classical curriculum, that was perceived to be elitist, and teach more practical subjects.
  • 12. 
    He made popular the idea of teaching by getting students actively involved in learning through using all of their senses. His particular method for doing this was called the object lesson.
  • 13. 
    According to ________________, schemes are basic building blocks, organized systems of actions or thoughts that enable us to mentally represent the object and events of the world in an attempt to adapt to the environment. As schemes become increasingly more complex they are termed structures.
  • 14. 
    He defined education as the harmonious development of all the powers of the child, especially the intellect. This represented a fundamental shift in thinking from traditional schools which saw education as specialized institution for the development of the intellect alone.
    • A. 

      Jean Jacques Rousseau

    • B. 

      Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi

    • C. 

      Fredrich Froebel

    • D. 

      Johann Friedrich Herbart

    • E. 

      Maria Montessori

  • 15. 
    This educator stresses the respect with which the individuality and ability of each child should be treated; the importance of creating a happy, harmonious environment in which he or she can grow; and the value of self-activity and play as a foundation on which the integrated development of the whole person can be built.
    • A. 

      Jean Jacques Rousseau

    • B. 

      Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi

    • C. 

      Fredrich Froebel

    • D. 

      Johann Friedrich Herbart

    • E. 

      Maria Montessori

  • 16. 
    According to ________________, in the concrete operational stage, children are capable of taking another person's point of view and incorporating more than one perspective simultaneously.
  • 17. 
    He believed that humans are essentially productive and creative, and that fulfillment comes through developing these in harmony with God and the world. His vision was to stimulate an appreciation and love for children, to provide a new but small world for children to play with their age group and experience their first gentle taste of independence.
    • A. 

      Jean Jacques Rousseau

    • B. 

      Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi

    • C. 

      Fredrich Froebel

    • D. 

      Johann Friedrich Herbart

    • E. 

      Maria Montessori

  • 18. 
     This educator believed he taught the right way to deal with the child's soul as it gradually awoke from unconsciousness, because he understood clearly the relation between the unconcious condition of childhood and the conciousness of the mature mind.
    • A. 

      Rousseau

    • B. 

      Pestalozzi

    • C. 

      Froebel

    • D. 

      Herbart

    • E. 

      Montessori

  • 19. 
    This educator combines doing with observing. Then he lets children represent their observations objectively and certainly, not only by imitation but freely by remembrance, which thereby prepares for inventive activity.
    • A. 

      Rousseau

    • B. 

      Pestalozzi

    • C. 

      Froebel

    • D. 

      Herbart

    • E. 

      Montessori

  • 20. 
    Is  known as the "Father of Kindergarten" because he developed the first kindergarten in Germany in 1837.. His kindergarten developed theories and practices that are still being used today in kindergarten classrooms. His ideas were that children need to have play time in order to learn. 
  • 21. 
    _____________is acknowledged to be the “father of scientific pedagogy.”
  • 22. 
    This German educator/philosopher saw the teacher's essential task as identifying the existing interests of the student and relating them to the great store of human experience and culture in order to help the student become part of civilized life. He also held that the ultimate goal of education was the building of ethical character rather than the acquisition of knowledge. 
    • A. 

      Rousseau

    • B. 

      Pestalozzi

    • C. 

      Froebel

    • D. 

      Herbart

    • E. 

      Montessori

  • 23. 
    This german educator/philosopher  emphasized the importance of relating new concepts to the experience of the learner so that there would be less resistance to apperception of new ideas. He stressed the need for moral education through experience and brought the work of teaching into the area of conscious method. 
    • A. 

      Rousseau

    • B. 

      Pestalozzi

    • C. 

      Froebel

    • D. 

      Herbart

    • E. 

      Montessori

  • 24. 
    _____________and his followers designed a 5-step teaching method:
    • Prepare the pupils to be ready for the new lesson.
    • Present the new lesson.
    • Associate the new lesson with ideas studied earlier.
    • use examples to illustrate the lesson’s major points.
    • Test pupils to ensure they had learned the new lesson.
    • A. 

      Rousseau

    • B. 

      Pestalozzi

    • C. 

      Froebel

    • D. 

      Herbart

    • E. 

      Montessori

  • 25. 
        Since there is no substantive mind to be trained, it can no longer be said that learning is a matter of disciplining or training a mind; rather, learning is the formation of the _____________that constitutes a mind.
  • 26. 
        "right thinking will produce right action; volition or willing has its roots in thought." This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural undfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 27. 
    "In this outlook on the nature of learning, mind is wholly a matter of content -- a compound of elemental impressions bound together by association and formed when subject matter is presented from without and makes certain associations or connections with prior content of the mind." This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Apperception

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Mental discipline

  • 28. 
    "This outlook on the nature of learning stems logically from the theory that unless and until human beings are corrupted by some outside influences, every act that comes from them will be good." This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Apperception

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Mental discipline

  • 29. 
    "Since children grow up unfolding what nature has enfolded within them, devotees of this position tend to place great emphasis on the study of child growth and development and to minimize the study of learning" This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 30. 
    This educator's  contributions to the work of those of us raising and educating children are in these areas:
    • Preparing the most natural and life-supporting environments for the child
    • Observing the child living freely in this environment
    • Continually adapting the environment in order that the chid may fulfill his or her greatest potential, physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually.
    • A. 

      Rousseau

    • B. 

      Pestalozzi

    • C. 

      Froebel

    • D. 

      Herbart

    • E. 

      Montessori

  • 31. 
    This educator  was given the opportunity to study "normal" children, taking charge of fifty poor children of the dirty, desolate streets of the San Lorenzo slum on the outskirts of Rome. The news of the unprecedented success of  in this Casa dei Bambini "House of Children" soon spread around the world, people coming from far and wide to see the children for themselves.
    • A. 

      Rousseau

    • B. 

      Pestalozzi

    • C. 

      Froebel

    • D. 

      Herbart

    • E. 

      Montessori

  • 32. 
    "IF we are to develop a system of scientific pedagogy, we must, then, proceed along lines very different from those which have been followed up to the present time. The transformation of the school must be contemporaneous with the preparation of the teacher. For if we make of the teacher an observer, familiar with the experimental methods, then we must make it possible for her to observe and to experiment in the school."
    • A. 

      Rousseau

    • B. 

      Pestalozzi

    • C. 

      Froebel

    • D. 

      Herbart

    • E. 

      Montessori

  • 33. 
    His theory, Connectionism, stated that learning was the formation of a connection between stimulus and response.
    • A. 

      Edward Thorndike

    • B. 

      John B. Watson

    • C. 

      B.F. Skinner

    • D. 

      Ivan Pavlov

  • 34. 
    ______________'s experimental research gained much respect throughout Russia as well as America and the rest of the nations. Although he began his investigations late in life he managed to develop the major constructs of a fully realized field of learning
    • A. 

      Edward Thorndike

    • B. 

      John B. Watson

    • C. 

      B.F. Skinner

    • D. 

      Ivan Pavlov

  • 35. 
    He believed that intelligence is the ability to form connections and humans are the most evolved animal because they form more connections then any other being.
  • 36. 
    His theory, Connectionism, stated that learning was the formation of a connection between stimulus and response.
    • A. 

      Edward Thorndike

    • B. 

      John B. Watson

    • C. 

      B.F. Skinner

    • D. 

      Ivan Pavlov

  • 37. 
    According to this theorist, unconditioned stimulus (US) is an event that causes a response to occur, which is referred to as the unconditioned response (UR). .
  • 38. 
    ______________was a Russian physiologist whose research on the physiology of digestion led to the development of the first experimental model of learning, Classical Conditioning. Most of his research was gathered studying salivating dogs.
  • 39. 
    According to this theorist, psychology, is a purely objective, experimental branch of natural science which needs introspection as little as do the sciences of chemistry and physics.
    • A. 

      Thorndike

    • B. 

      Pavlov

    • C. 

      Watson

    • D. 

      Skinner

  • 40. 
    Certainly this theorist's research methods would be questioned today; however, his work did demonstrate the role of conditioning in the development of emotional responses to certain stimuli. This may explain certain fears, phobias and prejudices that people develop.
    • A. 

      Edward Thorndike

    • B. 

      Ivan Pavlov

    • C. 

      John B. Watson

    • D. 

      B.F. Skinner

  • 41. 
    By eliminating states of consciousness as proper objects of investigation, this theorist sought to remove the barrier of subjectivity from psychology which exists between it and the other sciences.
    • A. 

      Edward Thorndike

    • B. 

      Ivan Pavlov

    • C. 

      John B. Watson

    • D. 

      B.F. Skinner

  • 42. 
        ________________'s work differs from that of his predecessors (classical conditioning), in that he studied operant behavior (voluntary behaviors used in operating on the environment).
    • A. 

      Thorndike

    • B. 

      Pavlov

    • C. 

      Watson

    • D. 

      Skinner

  • 43. 
    According to this theorist, responses that are rewarded are likely to be repeated.
  • 44. 
    N 1938, he wrote The Behavior of Organisms in which the characteristics of operant behavior were becoming defined.
  • 45. 
    According to this theorist, responses that allow escape from painful or undesirable situations are likely to be repeated.
    • A. 

      Skinner

    • B. 

      Watson

    • C. 

      Pavlov

    • D. 

      Thorndike

  • 46. 
    According to this theorist, responses that bring painful or undesirable consequences will be suppressed, but may reappear if reinforcement contingencies change.
    • A. 

      Watson

    • B. 

      Pavlov

    • C. 

      Thorndike

    • D. 

      Skinner

  • 47. 
    ___________________argued that people are born with schemes, tendency to organize their thinking processes, which at birth he called reflexes.
  • 48. 
    According to ________________, in the formal operational stage, children still need to revise their knowledge base. Children by this stage are self motivators. They learn from reading and trying out new ideas as well as from helping friends and adults. He believed that not everyone reaches this stage of development.
  • 49. 
    According to ________________, in the sensorimotor stage, the child develops simple activities to a wider range of situations and coordinates them into lengthy chains of behavior.
  • 50. 
    According to ________________, in the preoperational stage, children start to use mental imagery and language. Children here are very egocentric. These children view things that are happening around them in only one point of view...their's.