Chapters 1-3 Psychstats Pretest

16 Questions | Total Attempts: 33

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Chapters 1-3 Psychstats Pretest

Equations- Z = (X � M) / SD SD2 = SS / N SS = Σ(X-M)2 M = Σ(X)/NFor the Z-Scores, please use the back of your book.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    What is the most representative measure of central tendency?
    • A. 

      The median, because it is the middle number

    • B. 

      The median, because it is the average of the numbers

    • C. 

      The mode, because it is the most recurring number

    • D. 

      The mean, because it is the average of the numbers

    • E. 

      The mean, because it is the middle number

  • 2. 
    In which set of scores should you use the median instead of the mean?
    • A. 

      11, 12, 13, 13, 14, 14, 14, 15, 15, 16, 17

    • B. 

      1, 40, 51, 102, 105, 107, 152, 155, 200

    • C. 

      4, 6, 6, 7, 7, 9, 10, 11

    • D. 

      14, 17, 19, 21, 22, 23, 25, 30, 34, 36

    • E. 

      17, 20, 20, 20, 25, 26, 27, 30, 35, 37, 40, 40, 40, 46

  • 3. 
    Which is the best measure of variability for a group of scores?
    • A. 

      The mean, because it is the average of the scores

    • B. 

      Average deviation, because it shows (on average) how the scores are spread out from the mean

    • C. 

      Variance, because it is describes the spread of the deviation scores

    • D. 

      Standard deviation, because it is labeled in usable units

    • E. 

      Variance, because it is the square root of standard deviation

  • 4. 
    What is the symbol for the variance of the population?
    • A. 

      σ

    • B. 

      σ2

    • C. 

      SD

    • D. 

      SD2

    • E. 

      S

  • 5. 
    Suppose a recent study described a particular sample of 50 college students who watched MTV nonstop for 30 days straight. After administering a test of logic and reasoning, they were found to have a mean score of 70 with a variance of 25. What score would a person need to have to be in the top 5%?
    • A. 

      78.2

    • B. 

      70.2

    • C. 

      75

    • D. 

      111

    • E. 

      66.5

  • 6. 
    Referring to the previous question, if a person scored a 54 on the test, what would be their Z score?
    • A. 

      3.2

    • B. 

      -.64

    • C. 

      -4

    • D. 

      -3.2

    • E. 

      4

  • 7. 
    There are 115 total people working on a computer in a library. 30 are studying for a history exam, 24 are completing statistics homework, and 61 are checking Facebook. Since all of the computers are taken, that means you will have to ask someone to leave. What is the probability that the person you ask will be checking Facebook or completing statistics homework?
    • A. 

      .17

    • B. 

      .85

    • C. 

      .53

    • D. 

      .21

    • E. 

      .74

  • 8. 
    John took a statistics aptitude test received a score of 12. Kayla took a different statistics test in and received 86.  However, John made the case that even though Kayla received the higher score, his test was much more difficult and he actually has greater knowledge of statistics than her. How can John show Kayla that he actually has superior statistics knowledge? (Assume both tests are normally distributed)Statistics for John’s Test: M= 8, SD=2 Statistics for Kayla’s Test: M= 60, SD=20
    • A. 

      John's score falls closer to Kayla's mean than does Kayla's score to John's mean

    • B. 

      John's score falls closer to his mean than does Kayla's score to her mean

    • C. 

      John's mean/SD proportion is larger than Kayla's mean/SD proportion

    • D. 

      Kayla's score falls closer to her mean than does John's score to his mean

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 9. 
    The following is data regarding hours studied in a statistics class:41751036289What is the SD for this set of scores?
    • A. 

      2.88

    • B. 

      8.25

    • C. 

      82.5

    • D. 

      0

    • E. 

      5.5

  • 10. 
    A variable is different from a value in that:
    • A. 

      A variable is a possible number or category that a value can have

    • B. 

      A value is a particular person's score, whereas a variable is the characteristic being measured

    • C. 

      The variable is the characteristic being measured, and a value is a possible number or category a score can have

    • D. 

      A variable is a categorical variable, but a value is a numeric variable

    • E. 

      A variable can vary, but a value has no range

  • 11. 
    How many clubs you are apart of at Maryville is an example of:
    • A. 

      A categorical variable

    • B. 

      A nominal variable

    • C. 

      An equal-interval variable

    • D. 

      An ordinal variable

    • E. 

      An equal-interval ratio variable

  • 12. 
    What would this distribution be called?
    • A. 

      Kurtotic Skew

    • B. 

      Right/Postive Skew

    • C. 

      Ceiling Effect

    • D. 

      Left/Postive Skew

    • E. 

      Right/NegativeSkew

  • 13. 
    Drawing conclusions that go beyond the number from a research study is/are:
    • A. 

      Descriptive Statistics

    • B. 

      Variability

    • C. 

      The Z Distribution

    • D. 

      Inferential Statistics

    • E. 

      Probability

  • 14. 
    In a study, “All College Students” are the  ______________ while “Maryville Students” are the ______________.
    • A. 

      Sample, Population

    • B. 

      Group, Sample

    • C. 

      Subjects, Population

    • D. 

      Sample, Subjects

    • E. 

      Population, Sample

  • 15. 
    If you were doing a study on Maryville Students and you chose people from your Statistics class to be the subjects, what kind of selection would this be?
    • A. 

      Random

    • B. 

      Exclusive

    • C. 

      Selective Convenience

    • D. 

      Haphazard

    • E. 

      Problematic

  • 16. 
    How many times something is supposed to happen over the long run is called:
    • A. 

      Relative Frequency

    • B. 

      Expected Frequency

    • C. 

      Expected Relative Frequency

    • D. 

      Frequency

    • E. 

      Probability