Chapter 6: Memory (Grivas)

20 Questions | Total Attempts: 274

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Memory Quizzes & Trivia

Unit 3 exam prep.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Memory is best described as
    • A. 

      A unitary system through which information flows back and forth.

    • B. 

      The storage and retrieval of information acquired through learning.

    • C. 

      A multi-store system in which all information is active.

    • D. 

      Three independent systems called sensory memory, short-term memory and long-term memory.

  • 2. 
    Which type of long-term memory storage is likely to be involved when a person recalls how to play a computer game after not having played it for some time?
    • A. 

      Procedural

    • B. 

      Episodic

    • C. 

      Declarative

    • D. 

      Semantic

  • 3. 
    Dementia is
    • A. 

      An illness or disease that is a normal part of ageing.

    • B. 

      Iconic memory.

    • C. 

      The phonological loop.

    • D. 

      Irreversible when neurodegenerative.

  • 4. 
    On recovering consciousness, a cyclist who was knocked unconscious in an accident is unable to recall events that occurred in the half hour or so before he was knocked out. How would his amnesia be explained by consolidation theory?
    • A. 

      Lack of sufficient time for consolidation of sensory information in short-term memory

    • B. 

      Lack of attention during the half hour before the brain trauma

    • C. 

      Lack of processing by the hippocampus in the parietal lobe

    • D. 

      Lack of time for completion of changes in neurons involved in the formation of long-term memory

  • 5. 
    A feature of short-term memory or working memory that distinguishes it from both sensory memory and long term memory is that
    • A. 

      Short-term memory is like a mental ‘working area’ for processing information in conscious awareness.

    • B. 

      Information in both sensory memory and long-term memory can be rehearsed, whereas information in short-term memory cannot be rehearsed.

    • C. 

      Short-term memory can store information for only a limited period of time, whereas both sensory memory and long-term memory can potentially store information for an unlimited period of time.

    • D. 

      Information in sensory memory and long-term memory has been encoded, whereas information in short-term memory has not been encoded.

  • 6. 
    Long-term potentiation is best described as
    • A. 

      The long-lasting strengthening of synaptic connections resulting in enhanced functioning of neurons.

    • B. 

      Habituation in Aplysia.

    • C. 

      The formation of a long-term memory.

    • D. 

      The potential to form a long-term memory.

  • 7. 
    Most theories of long-term memory storage propose that information in long-term memory is stored primarily in a form that is
    • A. 

      An exact sensory replica of the original information.

    • B. 

      Echoic and iconic.

    • C. 

      Semantical.

    • D. 

      Disorganised.

  • 8. 
    A neurodegenerative disease is best described as
    • A. 

      A brain trauma.

    • B. 

      An inflicted or acquired brain injury.

    • C. 

      A brain-related disorder associated with people of the older generation.

    • D. 

      A progressive decline in the structure and/or function of neurons in the central nervous system.

  • 9. 
    One way of prolonging the duration of information well beyond its normal limit in short-term or working memory is through
    • A. 

      Encoding.

    • B. 

      Rehearsal.

    • C. 

      Recall.

    • D. 

      Consolidation.

  • 10. 
    Kandel’s research on the role of the neuron in memory indicates that
    • A. 

      There is an increase in the amount of synapses produced by neurons, thereby enabling them to flow more freely within a memory circuit.

    • B. 

      When a memory is forming, new neurotransmitters grow and interconnect the neurons to form a pathway for the information.

    • C. 

      Neurons change in structure and function when a memory is forming.

    • D. 

      Neurons assemble in a formation that creates a neural pathway for the memory.

  • 11. 
    Semantic network theory proposes that information in long-term memory is
    • A. 

      Organised in different levels depending on the depth of processing.

    • B. 

      Organised systematically, but the information is not necessarily related within each part of a network.

    • C. 

      Organised in the form of overlapping networks of nodes that are interconnected and interrelated by meaningful links.

    • D. 

      Not organised.

  • 12. 
    The levels of processing framework focuses on memory as a _____ system.
    • A. 

      Multi-store

    • B. 

      Inflexible

    • C. 

      Single

    • D. 

      Shallow or deep

  • 13. 
    The process of organising smaller, separate bits of information into groups of related bits of information in order to increase the storage capacity of short-term memory is called
    • A. 

      Grouping.

    • B. 

      Maintenance rehearsal.

    • C. 

      Chunking.

    • D. 

      Elaborative rehearsal.

  • 14. 
    Information in the middle of a 15-item word list that has just been learnt is least likely to be recalled shortly after because this information is
    • A. 

      Still in short-term memory.

    • B. 

      Confused with information that precedes it and information that follows it.

    • C. 

      Still in long-term memory.

    • D. 

      Learned too late to be adequately rehearsed and too early to be held in the STM without rehearsal.

  • 15. 
    The process of representing information in a form that can be used by memory is best described as
    • A. 

      Rehearsal.

    • B. 

      Encoding.

    • C. 

      Information-processing.

    • D. 

      Automatic processing.

  • 16. 
    Which of the following activities is the best example of the use of information retrieved from implicit memory?
    • A. 

      Distinguishing between a shark and a dolphin

    • B. 

      Telling a friend about how the weekend was spent

    • C. 

      Riding a bike

    • D. 

      Recalling a word for a crossword puzzle

  • 17. 
    The serial position effect used to describe superior recall of items at the end of a list is called the _________ effect.
    • A. 

      Recency

    • B. 

      Primacy

    • C. 

      Serial

    • D. 

      Recall

  • 18. 
    What is required for information to be transferred from a sensory register to short-term or working memory?
    • A. 

      Attention

    • B. 

      Encoding

    • C. 

      Rehearsal

    • D. 

      Organisation

  • 19. 
    Which specific type of long-term memory store is likely to be involved when a person recalls their first day as a VCE student?
    • A. 

      Procedural

    • B. 

      Episodic

    • C. 

      Declarative

    • D. 

      Semantic

  • 20. 
    Which memory system or sub-system stores information for the shortest duration?
    • A. 

      Short-term memory

    • B. 

      Working memory

    • C. 

      Echoic memory

    • D. 

      Iconic memory

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