Anatomy - The Incredible Human Machine

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Anatomy - The Incredible Human Machine - Quiz

Our bodies are so much more than two arms, two legs, a torso and a head. There is so much going on inside of us, beneath the service, that keep our lives running smoothly. What are they? Find out in this quiz all about Anatomy – The Incredible Human Machine.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What are the building blocks of all organisms?

    • A.

      Atoms

    • B.

      Molecules

    • C.

      Organelles

    • D.

      Cells

    • E.

      Tissues

    Correct Answer
    D. Cells
    Explanation
    Cells are the building blocks of all organisms. They are the smallest unit of life and perform all the necessary functions for an organism to survive and function. Cells are responsible for carrying out processes such as metabolism, growth, and reproduction. They are the fundamental structural and functional units of living organisms, making them the correct answer to this question.

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  • 2. 

    How many types of cells are in our bodies?

    • A.

      100

    • B.

      200

    • C.

      300

    • D.

      400

    • E.

      500

    Correct Answer
    B. 200
    Explanation
    The human body consists of various types of cells that perform different functions. These cells include red blood cells, white blood cells, nerve cells, muscle cells, and many more. The correct answer is 200, indicating that there are approximately 200 different types of cells in our bodies.

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  • 3. 

    How many types of Nutrients are in food?

    • A.

      6

    • B.

      5

    • C.

      10

    • D.

      8

    • E.

      15

    Correct Answer
    A. 6
    Explanation
    There are six types of nutrients in food. These include carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water. These nutrients are essential for the proper functioning of the body and to maintain good health. Each nutrient has its own specific role and is required in different quantities.

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  • 4. 

    Which of the followings is used as energy source?

    • A.

      Water

    • B.

      Minerals

    • C.

      Vitamins

    • D.

      Carbohydrates

    • E.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. Carbohydrates
    Explanation
    Carbohydrates are used as an energy source in the body. When consumed, they are broken down into glucose, which is then converted into ATP (adenosine triphosphate) through cellular respiration. ATP is the primary source of energy for cellular processes and is used by the body to fuel various activities, such as muscle contractions, nerve impulses, and metabolic reactions. Therefore, carbohydrates play a crucial role in providing the energy needed for the body to function properly.

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  • 5. 

    Which one of the followings speeds up the rate of a chemical reaction in your body?

    • A.

      Vitamins

    • B.

      Carbohydrates

    • C.

      Water

    • D.

      Lipids

    • E.

      Enzymes

    Correct Answer
    E. Enzymes
    Explanation
    Enzymes are biological molecules that act as catalysts in chemical reactions within the body. They speed up the rate of reactions by lowering the activation energy required for the reaction to occur. Enzymes are specific to particular reactions and can be affected by factors such as temperature, pH, and substrate concentration. Vitamins, carbohydrates, water, and lipids are important for various bodily functions but do not directly speed up chemical reactions in the same way that enzymes do.

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  • 6. 

    Which of the followings processes the food in our body?

    • A.

      Circulatory system

    • B.

      Lymphatic system

    • C.

      Urinary system

    • D.

      Endocrine system

    • E.

      Digestive system

    Correct Answer
    E. Digestive system
    Explanation
    The digestive system processes the food in our body. It is responsible for breaking down the food we eat into smaller molecules that can be absorbed and used by our body. This process involves the mechanical and chemical digestion of food in the mouth, stomach, and intestines. The nutrients from the digested food are then absorbed into the bloodstream and transported to different parts of the body for energy and growth. The digestive system also eliminates waste materials from the body through the process of defecation.

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  • 7. 

    Which of the followings is the main organ of Digestive system?

    • A.

      Esophagus

    • B.

      Pancreas

    • C.

      Liver

    • D.

      Gall-bladder

    • E.

      Stomach

    Correct Answer
    E. Stomach
    Explanation
    The stomach is considered the main organ of the digestive system because it plays a crucial role in breaking down food and facilitating the digestion process. It receives food from the esophagus and uses its strong muscles to churn and mix the food with digestive juices, breaking it down into smaller particles. The stomach also secretes enzymes and acids that help in the breakdown of proteins and kill bacteria in the food. Additionally, the stomach regulates the release of partially digested food into the small intestine for further digestion and absorption of nutrients.

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  • 8. 

    Which one of the followings is not an organ of Digestive system?

    • A.

      Spleen

    • B.

      Liver

    • C.

      Ascending colon

    • D.

      Rectum

    • E.

      Pancreas

    Correct Answer
    A. Spleen
    Explanation
    The spleen is not an organ of the digestive system. It is part of the lymphatic system and is responsible for filtering blood, removing old or damaged red blood cells, and producing certain types of white blood cells. The liver, ascending colon, rectum, and pancreas, on the other hand, are all organs that play important roles in the process of digestion.

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  • 9. 

    Which type of digestion takes place when food is chewed, mixed and churned?

    • A.

      Mechanical

    • B.

      Chemical

    • C.

      Physical

    • D.

      All of above

    • E.

      None of them

    Correct Answer
    A. Mechanical
    Explanation
    Mechanical digestion refers to the physical breakdown of food through chewing, mixing, and churning. This process helps to break down large food particles into smaller ones, making it easier for enzymes to access and break down the food further. Mechanical digestion occurs in the mouth through chewing, in the stomach through mixing and churning, and in the small intestine through segmentation. Therefore, the correct answer is Mechanical.

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  • 10. 

    When does a chemical digestion occur?

    • A.

      It occurs when food is chewed, mixed and churned.

    • B.

      It occurs when chemical reactions occur that break down large molecules of food into smaller ones.

    • C.

      It occurs when chemical reactions occur after big molecules are made from simple ones.

    • D.

      It occurs when the food leaves the stomach.

    • E.

      It occurs when energy in food molecules is released as ATP

    Correct Answer
    B. It occurs when chemical reactions occur that break down large molecules of food into smaller ones.
    Explanation
    Chemical digestion occurs when chemical reactions break down large molecules of food into smaller ones. This process involves the action of enzymes that break down complex carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids into simpler forms that can be absorbed by the body. This is an essential step in the digestive process as it allows for the efficient absorption of nutrients. The other options mentioned in the question, such as chewing, mixing, churning, the formation of big molecules from simple ones, and the release of energy as ATP, are not specific to chemical digestion.

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  • 11. 

    The circulatory system is also known as:

    • A.

      The pulmonary system

    • B.

      The cardiovascular system

    • C.

      The endocrine system

    • D.

      The lymphatic system

    • E.

      Regulator system

    Correct Answer
    B. The cardiovascular system
    Explanation
    The cardiovascular system is the correct answer because it refers to the network of blood vessels, including the heart, that circulates blood throughout the body. This system is responsible for transporting oxygen, nutrients, hormones, and waste products to and from the cells. The term "cardio" refers to the heart, which plays a central role in this system. The other options listed, such as the pulmonary system, endocrine system, lymphatic system, and regulator system, are not accurate names for the circulatory system.

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  • 12. 

    What is the main organ of Circulatory system?

    • A.

      Heart

    • B.

      Spleen

    • C.

      Adrenal

    • D.

      Liver

    • E.

      Vessels

    Correct Answer
    A. Heart
    Explanation
    The main organ of the circulatory system is the heart. The heart is responsible for pumping blood throughout the body, delivering oxygen and nutrients to the cells and removing waste products. It is a muscular organ located in the chest, and it consists of four chambers that work together to ensure proper blood flow. The heart plays a vital role in maintaining the overall functioning of the circulatory system, making it the correct answer to this question.

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  • 13. 

    What types of blood vessels are there in our body?

    • A.

      Arteries, small vessels, tonsils

    • B.

      Arteries, main vessels, capillaries

    • C.

      Capillaries, tonsils, veins

    • D.

      Lymphs vessels. tonsils

    • E.

      Arteries, capillaries, veins

    Correct Answer
    E. Arteries, capillaries, veins
    Explanation
    Arteries, capillaries, and veins are the three main types of blood vessels in our body. Arteries carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to the rest of the body. Capillaries are tiny, thin-walled vessels where oxygen and nutrients are exchanged with tissues. Veins then carry deoxygenated blood back to the heart. These three types of blood vessels work together to ensure the circulation of blood throughout the body, delivering oxygen and nutrients to cells and removing waste products.

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  • 14. 

    Which of the followings has a function in carrying oxygen and carbon dioxide?

    • A.

      Red blood cells

    • B.

      White blood cells

    • C.

      Plasma

    • D.

      Platelets

    • E.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    A. Red blood cells
    Explanation
    Red blood cells have a function in carrying oxygen and carbon dioxide. They contain a protein called hemoglobin, which binds to oxygen in the lungs and carries it to the body's tissues. In the tissues, hemoglobin releases the oxygen and binds to carbon dioxide, which is then transported back to the lungs to be exhaled. White blood cells are involved in the immune response, plasma is the liquid component of blood, and platelets are involved in blood clotting. However, none of these components have a direct function in carrying oxygen and carbon dioxide like red blood cells do.

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  • 15. 

    What does carry nutrients and other substances in the blood?

    • A.

      Red blood cells

    • B.

      White blood cells

    • C.

      Plasma

    • D.

      Platelets

    • E.

      None of them

    Correct Answer
    C. Plasma
    Explanation
    Plasma is the correct answer because it is the liquid component of blood that carries nutrients, hormones, waste products, antibodies, and other substances throughout the body. Red and white blood cells, as well as platelets, are cellular components of blood and do not carry nutrients and other substances in the same way that plasma does.

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  • 16. 

    What does occur when the coronary circulation is blocked?

    • A.

      The blood can't move in the vessels

    • B.

      White blood cells can't destroy the harmful microorganisms

    • C.

      Platelets don't form clots

    • D.

      Oxygen and nutrients cannot reach all the cells.

    • E.

      All of above

    Correct Answer
    D. Oxygen and nutrients cannot reach all the cells.
    Explanation
    When the coronary circulation is blocked, oxygen and nutrients cannot reach all the cells. The coronary circulation supplies blood to the heart muscle, and when it is blocked, it restricts the flow of blood to the heart. This can lead to a condition called ischemia, where the heart muscle does not receive enough oxygen and nutrients to function properly. This can result in chest pain (angina) or even a heart attack if the blockage is severe enough.

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  • 17. 

    What is HYDROPERICARDIUM?

    • A.

      Dropsy of the Pericardium

    • B.

      Hemopericardium is an infiltration of blood into the pericardium

    • C.

      An inflammation of the lining membrane of the heart, and is generally confined to the valves, though other parts may be affected.

    • D.

      Endocarditis Verrucosa

    • E.

      Diphtheritic Endocarditis

    Correct Answer
    A. Dropsy of the Pericardium
    Explanation
    Hydropericardium, also known as dropsy of the pericardium, refers to the accumulation of fluid in the pericardial sac surrounding the heart. This condition can occur due to various factors such as heart failure, inflammation, infection, or trauma. The excess fluid puts pressure on the heart, impairing its ability to function properly. Symptoms may include chest pain, shortness of breath, and swelling in the legs or abdomen. Prompt medical intervention is necessary to relieve the fluid buildup and treat the underlying cause.

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  • 18. 

    Which body system brings oxygen into the body?

    • A.

      Endocrine system

    • B.

      Lymphatic system

    • C.

      Circulatory system

    • D.

      Respiratory system

    • E.

      Nervous system

    Correct Answer
    D. Respiratory system
    Explanation
    The respiratory system is responsible for bringing oxygen into the body. It consists of organs such as the lungs, trachea, and bronchi, which work together to facilitate the intake of oxygen and the release of carbon dioxide. When we breathe in, oxygen enters the lungs and is transported to the bloodstream, where it is then distributed to the cells in the body. The respiratory system also helps remove waste gases from the body through exhalation.

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  • 19. 

    Where does air start its journey?

    • A.

      From the lungs

    • B.

      From the mouth

    • C.

      From the mouth

    • D.

      From the nose

    • E.

      From the larynx

    Correct Answer
    D. From the nose
    Explanation
    Air starts its journey from the nose. The nose acts as the primary entrance for air into the respiratory system. When we breathe in, air enters through the nostrils and passes through the nasal cavity, where it is filtered, warmed, and moistened before reaching the lungs. The nose also contains tiny hairs and mucus that help to trap dust, bacteria, and other particles present in the air, preventing them from entering the lungs. Therefore, the nose plays a crucial role in the initial stages of the air's journey into our body.

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  • 20. 

    What does the upper part of the trachea contain?

    • A.

      The larynx

    • B.

      Bronchi

    • C.

      Diaphragm

    • D.

      Alveoli

    • E.

      None of them

    Correct Answer
    A. The larynx
    Explanation
    The upper part of the trachea contains the larynx. The larynx, also known as the voice box, is a structure located at the top of the trachea and below the pharynx. It plays a vital role in the production of sound and acts as a passageway for air to enter the lower respiratory system. It houses the vocal cords, which vibrate to produce sound when air passes through them.

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  • 21. 

    Where are the vocal cords found?

    • A.

      At the opening of larynx

    • B.

      In the mouth

    • C.

      At the end of trachea

    • D.

      At the end of larynx

    • E.

      None of them

    Correct Answer
    A. At the opening of larynx
    Explanation
    The vocal cords are found at the opening of the larynx. The larynx, also known as the voice box, is located in the throat and is responsible for producing sound. The vocal cords are two bands of muscle tissue that vibrate to create sound when air passes through them. They are situated at the opening of the larynx, allowing them to control the flow of air and produce different pitches and tones.

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  • 22. 

    Which of the following is the main organ of Respiratory system?

    • A.

      Pharynx

    • B.

      Larynx

    • C.

      Alveoli

    • D.

      Bronchi

    • E.

      Lungs

    Correct Answer
    E. Lungs
    Explanation
    The lungs are the main organ of the respiratory system. They are responsible for the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the body. Oxygen is taken in through the lungs and transported to the bloodstream, while carbon dioxide is removed from the bloodstream and exhaled out of the body. The lungs are composed of millions of tiny air sacs called alveoli, where the gas exchange takes place. The other options listed, such as the pharynx, larynx, and bronchi, are also part of the respiratory system, but the lungs play the central role in respiration.

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  • 23. 

    What is the name of microscopic air sacs which provides gas exchanges?

    • A.

      Bronchiolus

    • B.

      Lungs

    • C.

      Pharynx

    • D.

      Larynx

    • E.

      Alveoli

    Correct Answer
    E. Alveoli
    Explanation
    Alveoli are the microscopic air sacs in the lungs where gas exchange takes place. Oxygen from the inhaled air diffuses into the blood vessels surrounding the alveoli, while carbon dioxide, a waste product, diffuses out of the blood vessels into the alveoli to be exhaled. The thin walls of the alveoli and the extensive network of blood vessels allow for efficient exchange of gases, ensuring that oxygen is delivered to the body's tissues and carbon dioxide is removed.

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  • 24. 

    When do the waste gases leave the body?

    • A.

      During exhalation

    • B.

      During Ventilation

    • C.

      During Diffusion

    • D.

      During inhalation

    • E.

      None of them

    Correct Answer
    A. During exhalation
    Explanation
    During exhalation, waste gases such as carbon dioxide leave the body. This occurs when the diaphragm and intercostal muscles relax, causing the volume of the chest cavity to decrease. As a result, the pressure inside the lungs increases, forcing air out of the lungs and expelling waste gases. This process is essential for maintaining proper gas exchange in the body and ensuring the removal of waste products generated by cellular respiration.

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  • 25. 

    Which organ controls breathing?

    • A.

      Brain

    • B.

      Spleen

    • C.

      Lungs

    • D.

      Heart

    • E.

      None of them

    Correct Answer
    A. Brain
    Explanation
    The brain controls breathing. It sends signals to the respiratory muscles, such as the diaphragm, to contract and relax, allowing us to inhale and exhale. The brain constantly monitors the levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood and adjusts the breathing rate accordingly to maintain a balance. This control is essential for the body to receive enough oxygen and remove waste gases efficiently. The spleen, lungs, and heart are not directly involved in the control of breathing.

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  • 26. 

    What is called the mechanics of breathing in and out?

    • A.

      Ventilation

    • B.

      Exhalation

    • C.

      Inhalation

    • D.

      Diffusion

    • E.

      Osmosis

    Correct Answer
    A. Ventilation
    Explanation
    Ventilation is the process of breathing in and out, which involves the movement of air in and out of the lungs. It includes both inhalation and exhalation. Inhalation refers to the intake of oxygen-rich air into the lungs, while exhalation is the release of carbon dioxide-rich air from the lungs. Ventilation is essential for the exchange of gases in the respiratory system, providing oxygen to the body's cells and removing carbon dioxide as a waste product.

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  • 27. 

    What does enlarge the chest cavity?

    • A.

      Lungs

    • B.

      Diaphragm

    • C.

      Trachea

    • D.

      Stomach

    • E.

      None of them

    Correct Answer
    B. Diaphragm
    Explanation
    The diaphragm is a dome-shaped muscle located beneath the lungs that plays a crucial role in the process of breathing. When we inhale, the diaphragm contracts and moves downward, creating more space in the chest cavity. This expansion allows the lungs to expand and fill with air. Therefore, the diaphragm is responsible for enlarging the chest cavity during inhalation.

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  • 28. 

    What are the functions of Lymphatic system?

    • A.

      Immunity and collection of excess body fluid back to the blood stream.

    • B.

      Controlling of breathing

    • C.

      Production of energy

    • D.

      Enabling the muscles to move freely

    • E.

      None of them

    Correct Answer
    A. Immunity and collection of excess body fluid back to the blood stream.
    Explanation
    The lymphatic system is responsible for maintaining immunity by producing and circulating lymphocytes, which are cells that help fight off infections and diseases. Additionally, it collects excess body fluid, known as lymph, from tissues and returns it back to the bloodstream. This helps maintain fluid balance in the body and prevents swelling. Therefore, the correct answer is "Immunity and collection of excess body fluid back to the blood stream."

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  • 29. 

    What are the organs of Lymphatic system?

    • A.

      Tonsils, thymus, spleen

    • B.

      Heart, vessels

    • C.

      Brain and spinal cord

    • D.

      Adrenal

    • E.

      Stomach and intestines

    Correct Answer
    A. Tonsils, thymus, spleen
    Explanation
    The organs of the lymphatic system are the tonsils, thymus, and spleen. These organs play important roles in the immune system and the production and circulation of lymphocytes, which are white blood cells that help fight off infections and diseases. The tonsils are located in the throat and help trap and filter out bacteria and other pathogens. The thymus is responsible for the development and maturation of T cells, which are a type of lymphocyte. The spleen filters the blood, removes old or damaged red blood cells, and helps fight off infections.

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  • 30. 

    What is the main organ of Lymphatic system?

    • A.

      Spleen

    • B.

      Heart

    • C.

      Stomach

    • D.

      Thymus

    • E.

      Tonsils

    Correct Answer
    A. Spleen
    Explanation
    The spleen is the main organ of the lymphatic system. It is responsible for filtering the blood, removing old or damaged red blood cells, and producing white blood cells that help fight off infections. The spleen also plays a role in storing and releasing blood cells when needed, such as during times of injury or stress. Additionally, the spleen helps to regulate the body's immune response by producing antibodies and removing foreign substances from the bloodstream.

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  • 31. 

    What is the other function of Lymphatic system?

    • A.

      To help circulatory system

    • B.

      Transporting of fats

    • C.

      Storing up of proteins

    • D.

      Protection f heart

    • E.

      None of them

    Correct Answer
    A. To help circulatory system
    Explanation
    The lymphatic system helps the circulatory system by returning excess fluid from the tissues back into the bloodstream. It also helps in the transportation of fats, as it absorbs dietary fats from the small intestine and transports them to the bloodstream. The lymphatic system does not store proteins or protect the heart.

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  • 32. 

    What is the function of Immune system?

    • A.

      Body defense

    • B.

      Fighting infections and cancer

    • C.

      Fighting the HIV

    • D.

      None of them

    • E.

      All of them

    Correct Answer
    E. All of them
    Explanation
    The immune system has multiple functions, including body defense, fighting infections, fighting cancer, and even combating HIV. It is responsible for protecting the body against harmful pathogens, such as bacteria and viruses, as well as abnormal cells like cancer cells. Additionally, the immune system plays a crucial role in identifying and eliminating HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Therefore, the correct answer is "All of them," as the immune system performs all these functions.

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  • 33. 

    Which body system removes most of the wastes in our blood?

    • A.

      Digestive system

    • B.

      Respiratory system

    • C.

      Urinary system

    • D.

      Integumentary system

    • E.

      None of them

    Correct Answer
    C. Urinary system
    Explanation
    The urinary system is responsible for removing most of the wastes in our blood. It consists of the kidneys, which filter the blood and remove waste products such as urea, excess water, and electrolytes. These waste products are then excreted in the form of urine. The digestive system breaks down food and absorbs nutrients, but it does not primarily remove waste from the blood. The respiratory system exchanges gases, but it does not play a major role in waste removal. The integumentary system helps regulate body temperature and protects against pathogens, but it is not primarily involved in waste removal.

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  • 34. 

    What are the main organs of the system which removes the most of the wastes in our blood?

    • A.

      Lungs

    • B.

      Heart

    • C.

      Kidneys

    • D.

      Skin

    • E.

      None of them

    Correct Answer
    C. Kidneys
    Explanation
    The kidneys are the main organs responsible for removing most of the wastes in our blood. They filter the blood, removing toxins, excess water, and waste products, which are then excreted as urine. The kidneys play a vital role in maintaining the body's fluid balance, regulating blood pressure, and producing hormones that control red blood cell production. While other organs like the lungs, heart, and skin also play important roles in maintaining overall health, the kidneys are specifically designed to filter and remove waste from the blood.

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  • 35. 

    Which of the following is the functioning unit of kidney?

    • A.

      Nephron

    • B.

      Hypothalamus

    • C.

      Urine

    • D.

      All of above

    • E.

      None of above

    Correct Answer
    A. Nephron
    Explanation
    The functioning unit of the kidney is the nephron. Nephrons are responsible for filtering waste products and excess water from the blood, reabsorbing necessary substances, and producing urine. They consist of a glomerulus, a tubule, and associated blood vessels. The nephron plays a crucial role in maintaining the body's fluid balance, regulating electrolyte levels, and removing waste products from the bloodstream. The hypothalamus is a part of the brain that regulates various bodily functions, while urine is the waste product produced by the kidneys. Therefore, the correct answer is Nephron.

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  • 36. 

    What is the organ of Integumentary system?

    • A.

      Spleen

    • B.

      Skin

    • C.

      Kidneys

    • D.

      Salivary glands

    • E.

      Lungs

    Correct Answer
    B. Skin
    Explanation
    The correct answer is skin. The integumentary system is composed of the skin, hair, nails, and various glands. It is responsible for protecting the body from external factors such as pathogens, UV radiation, and dehydration. The skin is the largest organ of the body and plays a crucial role in regulating body temperature, sensing touch, and excreting waste products.

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  • 37. 

    Which of the followings is the inner layer of skin?

    • A.

      Dermis

    • B.

      Epidermis

    • C.

      Endoderm

    • D.

      Ectoderm

    • E.

      Mesoderm

    Correct Answer
    A. Dermis
    Explanation
    The dermis is the correct answer because it is the inner layer of the skin. It is located beneath the epidermis and is composed of connective tissue, blood vessels, hair follicles, and sweat glands. The dermis provides support and nourishment to the epidermis and also contains sensory receptors for touch, pressure, and temperature.

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  • 38. 

    Which pigment gives the skin its color?

    • A.

      Urochrome

    • B.

      Yellow Ochre

    • C.

      Chrome Orange

    • D.

      Melanin

    • E.

      None of above

    Correct Answer
    D. Melanin
    Explanation
    Melanin is the pigment that gives the skin its color. It is produced by cells called melanocytes, which are located in the epidermis. The amount and type of melanin in the skin determine its color, ranging from light to dark. Melanin also helps protect the skin from the harmful effects of the sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays by absorbing and scattering the UV radiation. Therefore, melanin plays a crucial role in determining the color and protection of the skin.

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  • 39. 

    Which vitamin does skin produce?

    • A.

      Vitamin C

    • B.

      Vitamin A

    • C.

      Vitamin D

    • D.

      Vitamin B12

    • E.

      None of above

    Correct Answer
    C. Vitamin D
    Explanation
    The skin produces Vitamin D when it is exposed to sunlight. This is because sunlight helps the body convert a compound called 7-dehydrocholesterol into Vitamin D. Vitamin D is important for maintaining healthy bones and teeth, as well as supporting the immune system. While other vitamins like C, A, and B12 are important for various bodily functions, the skin does not produce them.

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  • 40. 

    Which system is included in Control systems except the Nervous system?

    • A.

      The lymphatic system

    • B.

      The Respiratory system

    • C.

      The Endocrine system

    • D.

      The Digestive system

    • E.

      The Urinary system

    Correct Answer
    C. The Endocrine system
    Explanation
    The endocrine system is included in control systems, along with the nervous system. The endocrine system consists of glands that produce and secrete hormones, which regulate various bodily functions and maintain homeostasis. These hormones are released into the bloodstream and act as chemical messengers, influencing the activity of cells and organs throughout the body. The nervous system, on the other hand, uses electrical signals to transmit information and control body functions. Both systems work together to coordinate and regulate the body's activities, but the endocrine system specifically focuses on hormone production and regulation.

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  • 41. 

    Which endocrine organ releases the hormone which increase the heart beats and blood glucose level?

    • A.

      Adrenal

    • B.

      Pituitary glands

    • C.

      Thyroid glands

    • D.

      Mammary gland

    • E.

      Pancreas

    Correct Answer
    A. Adrenal
    Explanation
    The adrenal glands release a hormone called adrenaline, also known as epinephrine, which increases heart rate and blood glucose levels. This hormone is released in response to stress or excitement, preparing the body for a "fight or flight" response.

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  • 42. 

    What is the name of disease which results from the absence of thyroid hormone during uterine life or infancy?

    • A.

      Micro-vascular Cranial nerve palsy

    • B.

      Influenza

    • C.

      Cretinism

    • D.

      AIDS

    • E.

      None of them

    Correct Answer
    C. Cretinism
    Explanation
    Cretinism is the correct answer because it refers to a condition that occurs when there is a deficiency or absence of thyroid hormone during uterine life or infancy. This hormone is essential for the normal development of the brain and body, so its absence can lead to severe mental and physical disabilities. Cretinism is characterized by stunted growth, intellectual disability, delayed development, and other symptoms related to thyroid hormone deficiency.

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  • 43. 

    What is CNS?

    • A.

      Central Nervous system

    • B.

      Control Nervous system

    • C.

      Common Nervous system

    • D.

      Cooperative Nerve system

    • E.

      None of them

    Correct Answer
    A. Central Nervous system
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Central Nervous System (CNS). The CNS is made up of the brain and spinal cord and is responsible for coordinating and controlling the body's activities. It receives and processes sensory information, initiates motor responses, and plays a crucial role in higher cognitive functions such as memory, learning, and decision-making. The CNS is essential for the functioning of the entire nervous system and is therefore the correct answer.

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  • 44. 

    The Peripheral Nervous system can be divided into two groups as:

    • A.

      Somatic and Autonomic

    • B.

      Somatic and cooperative

    • C.

      Somatic and central

    • D.

      Central and Peripheral

    • E.

      None of above

    Correct Answer
    A. Somatic and Autonomic
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Somatic and Autonomic. The peripheral nervous system is responsible for transmitting information between the central nervous system and the rest of the body. It can be divided into two groups: the somatic nervous system, which controls voluntary movements and sensory information, and the autonomic nervous system, which regulates involuntary processes such as heart rate, digestion, and breathing.

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  • 45. 

    Which of the followings is an involuntary part of Nervous system?

    • A.

      Somatic Nervous system

    • B.

      Autonomic Nervous system

    • C.

      Central system

    • D.

      Peripheral Nervous system

    • E.

      None of above

    Correct Answer
    B. Autonomic Nervous system
    Explanation
    The autonomic nervous system is the correct answer because it controls involuntary functions of the body such as heart rate, digestion, and breathing. Unlike the somatic nervous system, which controls voluntary movements, the autonomic nervous system operates automatically and without conscious control. It consists of two divisions, the sympathetic and parasympathetic, which work together to maintain homeostasis in the body. The central nervous system consists of the brain and spinal cord, while the peripheral nervous system includes all the nerves outside of the central nervous system.

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  • 46. 

    What are the organs of CNS?

    • A.

      Neurons

    • B.

      Brain

    • C.

      Spinal cord

    • D.

      Brain and Spinal Cord

    • E.

      None of above

    Correct Answer
    D. Brain and Spinal Cord
    Explanation
    The central nervous system (CNS) consists of the brain and the spinal cord. These two organs are responsible for receiving, processing, and transmitting information throughout the body. The brain controls cognitive functions, sensory perception, and motor coordination, while the spinal cord acts as a pathway for nerve signals between the brain and the rest of the body. Together, the brain and spinal cord play a crucial role in regulating and coordinating the body's activities.

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  • 47. 

    Which of the followings is the largest sense organ?

    • A.

      The eyes

    • B.

      The ears

    • C.

      The tounge

    • D.

      Skin

    • E.

      None of them

    Correct Answer
    D. Skin
    Explanation
    The skin is the largest sense organ in the human body. It covers the entire body and is responsible for the sense of touch. The skin contains numerous sensory receptors that detect various stimuli such as pressure, temperature, and pain. These receptors send signals to the brain, allowing us to perceive and respond to our environment. While the eyes, ears, and tongue are also sense organs, they are not as extensive in size or coverage as the skin.

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  • 48. 

    What is the name skeletal system which is located inside the body?

    • A.

      Endoskeleton

    • B.

      Exoskeleton

    • C.

      Hydroskeleton

    • D.

      Axial

    • E.

      None of above

    Correct Answer
    A. Endoskeleton
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Endoskeleton. The endoskeleton is the name of the skeletal system that is located inside the body. It provides support, protection, and structure to the body, and includes bones and cartilage. This internal framework allows for movement and helps to maintain the shape of the body.

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  • 49. 

    How many joints does a skeletal system have?

    • A.

      3

    • B.

      2

    • C.

      8

    • D.

      5

    • E.

      123

    Correct Answer
    A. 3
    Explanation
    The skeletal system consists of bones, which are connected to each other by joints. Joints allow for movement and flexibility in the body. Therefore, the correct answer is 3, as there are typically three types of joints in the human body: fibrous, cartilaginous, and synovial joints.

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  • 50. 

    Which joint can not move freely?

    • A.

      Movable joints

    • B.

      Slightly movable joints

    • C.

      Immovable joints

    • D.

      Backbone

    • E.

      Non Mobile joints

    Correct Answer
    B. Slightly movable joints
    Explanation
    Slightly movable joints are joints that have limited movement or restricted range of motion. Unlike movable joints, which allow for free movement, slightly movable joints have only a small amount of movement possible. Examples of slightly movable joints include the joints between the vertebrae in the spine and the joints between the bones in the pelvis. These joints provide stability and support rather than allowing for extensive movement.

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Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 19, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Apr 14, 2010
    Quiz Created by
    Gunay
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