Wound Closure And Suture

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| By Darbit
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Darbit
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Quizzes Created: 1 | Total Attempts: 2,682
Questions: 10 | Attempts: 2,686

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Wound Closure And Suture - Quiz

This is an example of an virtual learning exercise for nurses currently attempting compentency in suturing.

Student need to have completed this quiz before the end of the course.

The pass mark for this quiz has been set at 80%. If a student fails that do not fail the course, this is more for you to gauge where you are and to highlight some deficency in your learning that may need to be address before the final simulation.

Good Luck!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What are the 3 Layers of Skin?

    • A.

      Epidermis, Dermis, Hyperthermis

    • B.

      Epidermis, Dermis, Subcutaneous Tissue

    • C.

      Epidermis, Dermis, Percutaneous

    Correct Answer
    B. Epidermis, Dermis, Subcutaneous Tissue
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Epidermis, Dermis, Subcutaneous Tissue. The skin is composed of three main layers. The outermost layer is called the epidermis, which provides a protective barrier against the environment. Beneath the epidermis is the dermis, which contains blood vessels, nerves, and hair follicles. The innermost layer is the subcutaneous tissue, also known as the hypodermis, which consists of fat and connective tissue. This layer helps to insulate the body and acts as a cushion for underlying structures.

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  • 2. 

    Name the layers of the Epidermis

    • A.

      Stratum corneum, Stratum lucidum, Stratum granulosum Stratum germinativum

    • B.

      Stratum corneum, Stratum lucidum, Stratum granulosum, Stratum garminativum

    • C.

      Stratum corneum, Stratum cucidum, Stratum granulosum Stratum germinativum

    Correct Answer
    A. Stratum corneum, Stratum lucidum, Stratum granulosum Stratum germinativum
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Stratum corneum, Stratum lucidum, Stratum granulosum, Stratum germinativum. These are the layers of the epidermis, the outermost layer of the skin. The stratum corneum is the topmost layer, consisting of dead skin cells that provide a protective barrier. The stratum lucidum is a translucent layer found only in thick skin areas, such as the palms and soles. The stratum granulosum is responsible for producing keratin, a protein that strengthens the skin. And finally, the stratum germinativum, also known as the stratum basale, is the innermost layer where new skin cells are produced.

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  • 3. 

    Which is not a function of the skin?

    • A.

      Absorption

    • B.

      Excretion

    • C.

      Respiration

    Correct Answer
    C. Respiration
    Explanation
    Respiration is not a function of the skin. The skin primarily acts as a protective barrier for the body, regulating temperature, preventing water loss, and providing sensory information. Respiration, on the other hand, is the process of exchanging gases (oxygen and carbon dioxide) between the body and the external environment, which is primarily performed by the respiratory system, specifically the lungs.

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  • 4. 

    The use of suture to aid healing is an example of primary or secondary intent healing?

    • A.

      Primary

    • B.

      Secondary

    Correct Answer
    A. Primary
    Explanation
    The use of suture to aid healing is an example of primary intent healing because it involves the direct approximation of wound edges to promote healing. Primary intent healing is used for clean, well-approximated wounds with minimal tissue loss, where the edges can be easily brought together with sutures. This method allows for faster healing and minimal scarring. Secondary intent healing, on the other hand, is used for wounds with significant tissue loss or contamination, where healing occurs through the process of granulation and contraction.

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  • 5. 

    What are the three phases of healing?

    • A.

      Maturation, Inflammation, Proliferation

    • B.

      Proliferation,Mastication, Inflammation

    • C.

      Inflammation, Ploriferation, Maturation

    Correct Answer
    A. Maturation, Inflammation, Proliferation
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Maturation, Inflammation, Proliferation. During the healing process, the first phase is inflammation, where the body responds to tissue damage by increasing blood flow and releasing chemicals to repair the area. The second phase is proliferation, where new blood vessels and tissue are formed to replace the damaged ones. Finally, in the maturation phase, the newly formed tissue remodels and strengthens over time.

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  • 6. 

    What are the two types of suture materials?

    • A.

      Non-Absorbable, Reabsorbable

    • B.

      Absorbable, Non-absorbable

    • C.

      Non-Absorbable, Transportable

    • D.

      Polypropylene , Polyester

    Correct Answer
    D. Polypropylene , Polyester
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Absorbable, Non-absorbable. Suture materials can be categorized into two types based on their ability to be absorbed by the body. Absorbable sutures are made from materials that break down over time and are eventually absorbed by the body's natural processes. Non-absorbable sutures, on the other hand, are made from materials that are not absorbed by the body and need to be manually removed after the wound has healed. Polypropylene and polyester are examples of non-absorbable suture materials.

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  • 7. 

    What are the disadvantages to using braided (multifilaments) suture material?

    • A.

      High Risk of infection, High Risk of Reactivity

    • B.

      High Risk of Infection, High Failure Rate

    • C.

      Highly Unstable, Highly Infectious

    Correct Answer
    A. High Risk of infection, High Risk of Reactivity
    Explanation
    Braided (multifilaments) suture material has the disadvantage of a high risk of infection. This is because the braided structure allows bacteria to become trapped within the sutures, increasing the chances of infection at the surgical site. Additionally, braided sutures have a high risk of reactivity, meaning that they can cause an allergic or inflammatory reaction in some individuals. This can lead to complications and delayed wound healing. Therefore, the use of braided sutures should be carefully considered, especially in patients with a higher risk of infection or reactivity.

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  • 8. 

    What are the advantages to using monofilament suture material?

    • A.

      Strong Firm Knot, Minimal Tissue Reactivity

    • B.

      Minimal Tissue Reactivity, Reduced Risk of Infection

    • C.

      Low Risk of Infection, Is an Organic Product

    Correct Answer
    B. Minimal Tissue Reactivity, Reduced Risk of Infection
    Explanation
    Monofilament suture material offers several advantages, including minimal tissue reactivity and reduced risk of infection. Minimal tissue reactivity means that the suture material causes less irritation and inflammation in the surrounding tissues, leading to better wound healing. Reduced risk of infection is important as it lowers the chances of post-operative complications. Monofilament sutures also tend to be smoother and easier to handle, allowing for a strong, firm knot to be tied. Additionally, monofilament sutures are typically made from organic materials, which may be preferred by some patients.

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  • 9. 

    What is the maximum dose of Lignocaine?

    • A.

      5mcg\kg

    • B.

      0.5mg\kg

    • C.

      5mg\kg

    Correct Answer
    C. 5mg\kg
    Explanation
    The maximum dose of Lignocaine is 5mg/kg. This means that for every kilogram of body weight, the maximum amount of Lignocaine that can be administered is 5mg. This dosage is important to ensure patient safety and prevent any potential adverse effects or toxicity that may occur with higher doses.

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  • 10. 

    What is the maximum dose of Lignocaine with Adrenaline?

    • A.

      5mg\kg

    • B.

      7.5mg\kg

    • C.

      7mg\kg

    Correct Answer
    C. 7mg\kg
    Explanation
    The correct answer is 7mg/kg. Lignocaine with Adrenaline is a local anesthetic commonly used in medical procedures. The maximum dose refers to the highest amount of the medication that can be safely administered based on the patient's weight. In this case, the maximum dose is 7mg/kg, meaning that for every kilogram of the patient's weight, they can receive up to 7mg of Lignocaine with Adrenaline. This ensures that the medication is administered in a safe and effective manner, minimizing the risk of adverse effects.

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