Science, English, Maths Trivia Questions! Quiz

60 Questions | Total Attempts: 97

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Science, English, Maths Trivia Questions! Quiz

What we have here is some science, English, math trivia questions ideal for a student who wants to test their understanding of the subjects. Do you think you have perfect memory to get all the questions, right? The best way to find out is for you to actually take the quiz and choose the answer you see fit. All the best!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Choose the correct answer. The Himalayan range is considered as the world’s highest mountain range, with its tallest peak ... on the Nepal–China border.
    • A. 

      Hindu Kush

    • B. 

      Mt. Everest

    • C. 

      Tirich Mir

    • D. 

      Kunlun

  • 2. 
    Name the imaginary line (0.0) that separates the Northern and Southern hemispheres. 
    • A. 

      Equator

    • B. 

      Prime Meridian

    • C. 

      Longitude

    • D. 

      Tropic of Cancer

  • 3. 
    The imaginary line on the earth's surface, which closely follows the 180º meridian, is called ... . 
    • A. 

      International Date Line

    • B. 

      Tropic of Cancer

    • C. 

      Zero Meridian

    • D. 

      Prime Meridian

  • 4. 
    The United Kingdom consists of ... countries.
    • A. 

      2

    • B. 

      4

    • C. 

      6

    • D. 

      8

  • 5. 
    When a bird travels from its winter home in South America to its nesting area in New York, this is called ... .
    • A. 

      Conditioning.

    • B. 

      Migration.

    • C. 

      Hibernation.

    • D. 

      Progression.

  • 6. 
    What do the red arrows on this map show?
    • A. 

      Edwards Run

    • B. 

      Borders of the continents

    • C. 

      Gulf Stream

    • D. 

      Magellan expedition

  • 7. 
    Doggerland is a region that today lies covered by the ... Sea.
    • A. 

      North Sea

    • B. 

      Black Sea

    • C. 

      Yellow Sea

    • D. 

      Laptev Sea

  • 8. 
    When using a map you may NOT find … on it.
    • A. 

      A title

    • B. 

      A scale

    • C. 

      Photos

    • D. 

      A key or a legend

  • 9. 
    On an Ordnance Survey map, the following symbol stands for ... .
    • A. 

      Bus station

    • B. 

      Viewpoint

    • C. 

      Coniferous forest

    • D. 

      Picnic site

  • 10. 
    What city is home to the Taj Mahal?
    • A. 

      New Delhi

    • B. 

      Mumbai

    • C. 

      Hyderabad

    • D. 

      Agra

  • 11. 
    What capital of a Central Asian country does the picture show?
    • A. 

      Ankara

    • B. 

      Almaty

    • C. 

      Tashkent

    • D. 

      Astana 

  • 12. 
    The word ... usually refers to the areas with permanently frozen soil. It is a type of biome where the tree growth is prevented (delayed) by low temperatures and short growing seasons.
    • A. 

      Savanna

    • B. 

      Tundra

    • C. 

      Tropics

    • D. 

      Taiga

  • 13. 
    Which definition of water is NOT correct? Water is ...
    • A. 

      70% of Earth's surface.

    • B. 

      Tasteless and nearly white liquid.

    • C. 

      In seas, lakes, oceans, and rivers.

    • D. 

      A basic human need.

  • 14. 
    The U.S. Capitol is located about 38 miles southwest of Baltimore. This is its ... .
    • A. 

      Relative location

    • B. 

      Cultural region

    • C. 

      Absolute location

    • D. 

      None of these

  • 15. 
    People usually say “East or West  home is best.” East and west in Geography are called ... .
    • A. 

      Relative directions

    • B. 

      Absolute directions

    • C. 

      Cardinal directions

    • D. 

      Intermediate directions

  • 16. 
    Left, right, forward, backward, up, and down are examples of ... .
    • A. 

      Relative directions

    • B. 

      Absolute direction

    • C. 

      Cardinal directions

    • D. 

      Intermediate directions

  • 17. 
    Which is the smallest country, measured by total land area?
    • A. 

      Monaco

    • B. 

      Maldives

    • C. 

      Vatican

    • D. 

      Tuvalu

  • 18. 
    Which of these cities is not in Europe?
    • A. 

      Moscow

    • B. 

      Reykjavik

    • C. 

      Prague

    • D. 

      San Diego

  • 19. 
    What is the Japanese currency?
    • A. 

      Rupee

    • B. 

      Yen

    • C. 

      Yuan

    • D. 

      Won

  • 20. 
    Where do these animals live? 
    • A. 

      Africa

    • B. 

      South America

    • C. 

      Asia

    • D. 

      Europe

  • 21. 
    Read the text about amazing adventurers and match the headings(1-7) and the paragraphs (A-E). Write the number of suitable headings into the spaces provided after each paragraph. There are two extra headings. 1. A mountain climber 2. Adventures on sea 3. Amazing adventurers 4. Amazon adventurer 5. More than one adventure 6. Under the world 7. Where next?
  • 22. 
    From walking along the entire Amazon River to skiing to the South Pole, take a look at some of the 21st century's most amazing adventures! Have you ever dreamt of climbing Mount Everest or visiting Antarctica? If so, you’re not alone. Every year, thousands of people try to climb the world’s highest mountains or walk across continents. In the past, explorers had compasses and maps, but today’s adventurers have satellite phones and GPS. They also use their travels to let the world know about climate change and help people in the countries they visit. Let’s take a look at some of the 21st century’s greatest adventurers.
  • 23. 
    Ed Stafford from the UK is the first person to walk the length of the Amazon River. He started by a small stream in the Andes mountains of Peru and arrived at the river’s mouth in Brazil, two years and four months later. Snakes, crocodiles, and jaguars live in the Amazon rainforest, so it’s a dangerous place. Luckily, Ed avoided the big animals, but he was bitten by ants and mosquitoes every day. On his trip, Ed had to find food each morning. Sometimes the fruit, nuts, and fish he ate were hard to find and Ed often felt weak and hungry. The technology was essential for Ed. He used a radio to ask local people for food and permission to enter their land. Many of them came to meet him and guide him through the dense rainforest. As he walked, Ed wrote a blog about his daily experiences. Ed used his walk to let the world know about climate change and raise money for environmental charities in Brazil and Peru.
  • 24. 
    Four thousand climbers, aged between 13 and 80, have been to the top of Everest. Climbing high mountains requires a lot of preparation and is very dangerous, but some of the world’s best climbers are now looking for new challenges. Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner from Austria fell in love with climbing as a teenager. When she left school, she worked as a nurse and climbed in her free time. Starting with Everest, she has been climbing all the world’s fourteen peaks over 8,000 metres. To increase the challenge, Gerlinde climbs without using oxygen tanks. Low oxygen levels can make climbers ill, so Gerlinde has to climb slowly. Gerlinde is passionate about Nepal and raises money for a charity for poor children and orphans there.
  • 25. 
    Some of today’s adventurers go from challenge to challenge. Meagan McGrath from Canada has climbed the highest mountain on each continent, ridden a bike across Canada and run a long-distance race in the Sahara Desert. But perhaps her most incredible journey was a skiing trip to the South Pole. She pulled a tent and all her food on a sledge behind her as she skied. On the first day, she fell into a glacier and had to be rescued. Many people would have given up, but Meagan decided to carry on. Skiing through ice storms, she arrived at the South Pole forty days later. Erik Weihenmayer from the United States is another unstoppable adventurer. He’s climbed mountains, ridden a bike through the deserts of Morocco and kayaked through the Grand Canyon. Amazingly, Erik has been blind since the age of 13. Apart from his travels, he helps people with disabilities to live active lives and takes groups of young blind people on climbing expeditions.