Semester Exam Practice - Literary Elements (Part 1)

30 Questions
Literary Terms Quizzes & Trivia

AP Literature and English II - Semester Exam practice test - Review of literary devices and elements. Part 1 of 2. Please note: This is a timed examination. You will have 20 minutes to take the exam. 85% is the pass-rate. If you do not complete the test in 20 minutes, you will have to retake it from the beginning.

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    • A. 

      Apostrophe

    • B. 

      Oxymoron

    • C. 

      Paradox

    • D. 

      Simile

    • E. 

      Synecdoche

  • 2. 
    • A. 

      A charioteer

    • B. 

      A corpse

    • C. 

      A plague

    • D. 

      A sorcerer

    • E. 

      A trumpeter

  • 3. 
    • A. 

      Alliteration

    • B. 

      Antimetabole

    • C. 

      Antistrophe

    • D. 

      Apostrophe

    • E. 

      Asyndeton

  • 4. 
    “Destroyer and preserver” is an example of a statement that initially appears to be contradictory but, on closer inspection, turns out to make sense. This is known as a/an...
    • A. 

      Synecdoche

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Paradox

    • D. 

      Oxymoron

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 5. 
    Far, far beneath in the abysmal sea,His ancient, dreamless, uninvaded sleepThe Kraken sleepeth: faintest sunlights fleeAbout his shadowy sides: above him swell-from The Kraken by Alfred, Lord TennysonIn the excerpt above, "sleep" and "sleepeth" represent a stylistic scheme in which words derived from the same root are repeated. In other words, "uninvaded sleep" refers to sleep as a noun and sleepeth is a verb.What is the name of this stylistic device?
    • A. 

      Antimetabole

    • B. 

      Exemplum

    • C. 

      Hyperbaton

    • D. 

      Polyptoton

    • E. 

      Syllogism

  • 6. 
    A literary work, especially a play, that has a happy ending--often marked by marriage. Examples of this type of literary work include: The Taming of the Shrew and A Midsummer Night's Dream--both by William Shakespeare.
    • A. 

      Comedy

    • B. 

      History

    • C. 

      Morality

    • D. 

      Romance

    • E. 

      Tragedy

  • 7. 
    The high point of interest or suspense in a literary work is known as the _________.
    • A. 

      Exposition

    • B. 

      Rising action

    • C. 

      Climax

    • D. 

      Falling action

    • E. 

      Resolution

  • 8. 
    1  The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want. 2  He maketh me to lie down in green pastures:          he leadeth me beside the still waters.    3  He restoreth my soul:          he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name's sake.   4  Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,          I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.   5  Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies:          thou anointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over.   6  Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life:         and I will dwell in the house of the LORD for ever. The passage above--Psalm 23--represents which of the following literary devices?
    • A. 

      Caesura

    • B. 

      Conceit

    • C. 

      Dramatic monologue

    • D. 

      Hyperbole

    • E. 

      Metonymy

  • 9. 
    Unrhymed poetry written in iambic pentameter is known as __________.
    • A. 

      A ballad

    • B. 

      Blank verse

    • C. 

      Free verse

    • D. 

      Sestina

    • E. 

      Terza rima

  • 10. 
    AP QUESTION “To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time” by Robert Herrick Gather ye rosebuds while ye may,                 Old time is still a flying; And this same flower that smiles today                 Tomorrow will be dying.   The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun,                 The higher he’s a-getting, The sooner will his race be run,                 And nearer he’s to setting.   That age is best which is the first,                 When youth and blood are warmer: But being spent, the worse, and worst                 Times still succeed the former.   Then be not coy, but use your time,                 And, while ye may, go marry; For, having lost but once your prime,                 You may forever tarry.The theme of the poem above is an example of __________.
  • 11. 
    AP QUESTIONA song that tells a story, often dealing with adventure or romance, or a poem imitating such a song. Most of these songs or poems are divided into four- or six-line stanzas, are rhymed, use simple language, and depict dramatic action.
    • A. 

      Ballad

    • B. 

      Caesura

    • C. 

      Elegy

    • D. 

      Lyric poem

    • E. 

      Sonnet

  • 12. 
    Calling a cigarette a "smoke" or a businessman a "suit" are examples of what literary device?
    • A. 

      Conceit

    • B. 

      Epiphany

    • C. 

      Imagery

    • D. 

      Kenning

    • E. 

      Metonymy

  • 13. 
    A reference, in a work of literature, to a well-known person, place, event, literary work, or work of art is known as a/an _________.In the Twilight series, Stephenie Meyer mentions Wuthering Heights and Romeo and Juliet--her usage of these well-known literary works is an example of this literary device.
    • A. 

      Allegory

    • B. 

      Allusion

    • C. 

      Anapest

    • D. 

      Antimetabole

    • E. 

      Assonance

  • 14. 
    Deliberate exaggeration or overstament is known as _________.  Examples of this device include:  - I'm so tired I could sleep for a month.  - I'm so hungry I could eat a horse.  - I will just, like, die if my parents take away my cell phone.  - I don't have time to go out this weekend. I've got a million things to do.
    • A. 

      Apostrophe

    • B. 

      Hyperbole

    • C. 

      Isocolon

    • D. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • E. 

      Paradox

  • 15. 
    Poetry that is not written in a regular rhythmical pattern or meter is known as ______.Instead of having metrical feet and lines, this type of poetry has a rhythm that suits its meaning and that uses the sounds of spoken language in lines of different lengths. In other words--no rhyme, no meter = _____.from Marriage by Marianne Moore (1887-1972) This institution,perhaps one should say enterpriseout of respect for whichone says one need not change one’s mindabout a thing one has believed in,requiring public promisesof one’s intentionto fulfill a private obligation:I wonder what Adam and Evethink of it by this time,this fire-gilt steelalive with goldenness;how bright it shows—
    • A. 

      Balassi stanza

    • B. 

      Blank verse

    • C. 

      Free verse

    • D. 

      Rondel verse

    • E. 

      Terza rima

  • 16. 
    A poem expressing the observations and feelings of a single speaker is known as a/an _____.
    • A. 

      Elegy

    • B. 

      Epic poem

    • C. 

      Kenning

    • D. 

      Lyric poem

    • E. 

      Narrative poem

  • 17. 
    A poem that tells a story in verse is known as a/an _____.  Three traditional types of this poetry inlcude ballads, epics, and metrical romances.The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge is one example of this type of poem.
    • A. 

      Elegy

    • B. 

      Epic poem

    • C. 

      Kenning

    • D. 

      Metaphysical poem

    • E. 

      Narrative poem

  • 18. 
    A fourteen-line lyric poem with a single theme is known as a/an ______. This type of poem is usually written in iambic pentameter, but variances in meter do exist.
    • A. 

      Ballad

    • B. 

      Elegy

    • C. 

      Psalm

    • D. 

      Refrain

    • E. 

      Sonnet

  • 19. 
    AP QUESTIONA sonnet that is divided into two parts -- an octave and a sestet -- and usually has a rhyme scheme of abba abba cde cde is known as a/an __________ sonnet. The two parts of this sonnet work together. The octave raises a question, states a problem, or presents a brief narrative; the sestet answers the question, solves the problem or comments on the narrative.
    • A. 

      Miltonian

    • B. 

      Petrarchan

    • C. 

      Shakespearean

    • D. 

      Spenserian

    • E. 

      This does not actually explain a type of sonnet.

  • 20. 
    A sonnet comprised of three quatrains plus a concluding couplet is known as a/an ______ sonnet. The rhyme scheme is usually abab cdcd efef gg. Each of the quatrains explores a different variation of the main theme and the couplet presets a concluding statement.
  • 21. 
    A variant on the English form is the ______ sonnet. This form has a rhyme scheme of abab bcbc cdcd ee.
    • A. 

      Miltonian

    • B. 

      Petrarchan

    • C. 

      Shakespearean

    • D. 

      Spenserian

    • E. 

      This does not actually explain a type of sonnet.

  • 22. 
    Christina Rossetti uses what literary device to describe two sisters in this excerpt from "Goblin Market" Like two blossoms of one stem,Like two flakes of new-fallen snow,Like two wands of ivoryTipped with gold for awful kings.
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Oxymoron

    • C. 

      Paradox

    • D. 

      Simile

    • E. 

      Symbolism

  • 23. 
    The imaginary voice assumed by the writer of a poem is known as the ________.
  • 24. 
    The process of analyzing the metrical pattern of a poem is known as _______.
  • 25. 
    The time and place of the action of a literary work is known as the _______.
  • 26. 
    A long speech in a play or in a prose work made by a character who is alone and thus reveals his or her private thoughts and feelings to the audience or reader is known as a/an ______.
  • 27. 
    AP QUESTIONA metaphorical phrase, used in Anglo-Saxon poetry to replace a concrete noun is known as a/an ______.Examples include:battle-sweat = bloodraven-harvest = corpsebane-of-wood = firewhale-road = the seasea-steed = a ship
    • A. 

      Epithet

    • B. 

      Isocolon

    • C. 

      Kenning

    • D. 

      Paradox

    • E. 

      Spondee

  • 28. 
    The following example--from Robert Frost's To Earthward is an example of what type of imagery?"musk from hidden grapevine springs"
    • A. 

      Auditory

    • B. 

      Gustatory

    • C. 

      Olfactory

    • D. 

      Tactile

    • E. 

      Visual

  • 29. 
    AP QUESTIONThe quality of literary works that deal with the pleasures of a simple, rural life or with escape to a simpler place and time is known as _______.Christopher Marlowe's "The Passionate Shepherd to His Love" (p. 217 in your textbook) is an example of this.
  • 30. 
    A type of drama or literature that shows the downfall or destruction of a noble or outstanding character/person--traditionally one who possesses a character weakness or tragic flaw. Hamlet by Shakespeare and Antigone by Sophocles are examples of this type of drama.