Literary Elements Quiz: MCQ Test! Trivia

20 Questions | Total Attempts: 205

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Literary Elements Quiz: MCQ Test! Trivia - Quiz

Are you familiar with literary elements? Do you imagine you can conquer this quiz? A literary element of literature is a constituent of all narrative fiction. It is a necessary feature of verbal storytelling that can be found in any written or spoken narrative. Some examples of popular literary elements include plot, theme, character, and tone. Take this quiz and put your literary knowledge to the test.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Charlie expects to have more friends and to be more accepted when he becomes more intelligent in "Flowers for Algernon" by Daniel Keyes, but he actually loses his friends and his job.
    • A. 

      Dramatic irony

    • B. 

      Situational irony

    • C. 

      Verbal irony

    • D. 

      Inference

  • 2. 
    In "Flowers for Algernon," Algernon the mouse represents Charlie's experiences in the science experiment.
    • A. 

      Symbolism

    • B. 

      Hyperbole

    • C. 

      Allusion

    • D. 

      Suspense

  • 3. 
    The narrator states, "Bill is a liar and a cheat."
    • A. 

      Allusion

    • B. 

      Direct characterization

    • C. 

      Indirect characterization

    • D. 

      Hyberbole

  • 4. 
    At the beginning of "Flowers for Algernon," Charlie is hopeful and positive about his life and improving himself. By the end, after the experiment has failed, Charlie has a sense of hopelessness about the future.
    • A. 

      Round character

    • B. 

      Flat character

    • C. 

      Dynamic character

    • D. 

      Static chracter

  • 5. 
    In "The Tell-Tale Heart," all we know about the neighbor is that he is harmless and has no quarrel with the narrator, though the neighbor has a film over his eye. The neighbor is a:
    • A. 

      Round character

    • B. 

      Flat character

    • C. 

      Dynamic character

    • D. 

      Protagonist

  • 6. 
    The main character of "Green Gulch" is the narrator. He is a(n):
    • A. 

      Protagonist

    • B. 

      Antagonist

    • C. 

      Symbol

    • D. 

      Allusion

  • 7. 
    In "Green Gulch," a group of boys attacks the narrator. They could be considered to be:
    • A. 

      Protagonists

    • B. 

      Antagonists

    • C. 

      Allusions

    • D. 

      Hyperboles

  • 8. 
    In "The Fifty-First Dragon," the author reveals that Gawaine is cowardly without ever actually saying that Gawaine is a coward. Instead, the author writes: "He would hide in the woods when jousting class was called, although his companions and members of the faculty sought to appeal to his better nature by shouting to him to come out and break his neck like a man." This is an example of:
    • A. 

      Allusion

    • B. 

      Alliteration

    • C. 

      Indirect characterization

    • D. 

      Direct characterization

  • 9. 
    In Every Soul, a Star, Ally, Jack, and Bree are shown to have many aspects to their personality. Ally is clueless and insecure about life outside the camp but confident when it comes to science. Jack is shy and withdrawn, but he has artistic talent and gets along well with the kids at the camp. Bree is self-centered, but she is quick to help a small boy in need. They are all examples of:
    • A. 

      Round characters

    • B. 

      Flat characters

    • C. 

      Static characters

    • D. 

      Inference

  • 10. 
    The name of the place, Green Gulch, in the story entitled "Green Gulch" is an example of which literary device?
    • A. 

      Inference

    • B. 

      Hyperbole

    • C. 

      Foreshadowing

    • D. 

      Alliteration

  • 11. 
    A description from "Green Gulch": "It was a huge pool in a sandstone basin, green and dark with evening over it and trees leaning secretly inward above the water. When you looked down, you saw the sky ... I remember the quiet and the green ferns touching the green water." This is an example of:
    • A. 

      Imagery

    • B. 

      Hyperbole

    • C. 

      Direct characterization

    • D. 

      Indirect characterization

  • 12. 
    In "Flowers for Algernon," Charlie's teacher leaves the room because she says she has something in her eye. Charlie believes her, but the reader knows she is actually crying. This is an example of:
    • A. 

      Dramatic irony

    • B. 

      Situational irony

    • C. 

      Verbal irony

    • D. 

      Allusion

  • 13. 
    In "Ransom of Red Chief," Bill says that his favorite Biblical character is King Herod. This is an example of:
    • A. 

      Inference

    • B. 

      Hyperbole

    • C. 

      Allusion

    • D. 

      Imagery

  • 14. 
    One of Billy Collins' messages in the poem "On Turning 10" could be that as people grow older, they have to leave some of their hopes and dreams behind. This is an example of:
    • A. 

      Imagery

    • B. 

      Theme

    • C. 

      Indirect characterization

    • D. 

      Direct characterization

  • 15. 
    "Chris won't drive her home because she lives on the other side of the universe" is an example of which literary device?
    • A. 

      Protagonist

    • B. 

      Antagonist

    • C. 

      Allusion

    • D. 

      Hyperbole

  • 16. 
    In "The Tell-Tale Heart," the narrator becomes increasingly upset when the police officers would not leave. "Why would they not be gone? I paced the floor to and fro with heavy strides ..." During this section of the story, the readers wonder whether the narrator will get away with his crime. This is an example of:
    • A. 

      Flat character

    • B. 

      Round character

    • C. 

      Allusion

    • D. 

      Suspense

  • 17. 
    In "Green Gulch," the narrator states: "We played there, innocently at first." At first makes this sentence an example of:
    • A. 

      Foreshadowing

    • B. 

      Allusion

    • C. 

      Symbolism

    • D. 

      Alliteration

  • 18. 
    At the end of "The Fifty-First Dragon," the narrator never reveals what actually happened to Gawaine. The reader has to make a reasonable guess based on the evidence. This is called:
    • A. 

      Allusion

    • B. 

      Hyperbole

    • C. 

      Inference

    • D. 

      Foreshadowing

  • 19. 
    "Oh, great! You've broken my new smart phone" is an example of:
    • A. 

      Dramatic irony

    • B. 

      Situational irony

    • C. 

      Verbal irony

    • D. 

      Inference

  • 20. 
    Throughout the events of A Christmas Carol, Scrooge's nephew remains the same generous, friendly person he was at the beginning of the book. He is a(n)
    • A. 

      Antagonist

    • B. 

      Protagonist

    • C. 

      Static character

    • D. 

      Dynamic character

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