Lit Fiction Test One Terms

43 Questions | Total Attempts: 217

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Fiction Quizzes & Trivia

Lit fiction


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The rendering and ordering of the events and actions of a story
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Irony

    • C. 

      Plot

    • D. 

      Pace

  • 2. 
     problem in any piece of literature and is often classified according to the nature of the protagonist or antagonist
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Irony

    • C. 

      Plot

    • D. 

      Pace

    • E. 

      Conflict

  • 3. 
     occurs after the climax, where the conflict is resolved. It may contain a moment of final suspense, during which the final outcome of the conflict is in doubt.
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Irony

    • C. 

      Resolution

    • D. 

      Pace

    • E. 

      Conflict

  • 4. 
    Is a technique used by authors to provide clues for the reader to be able to predict what might occur later in the story. In other words, it is a technique in which an author drops subtle hints about plot developments to come later in the story.
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Irony

    • C. 

      Resolution

    • D. 

      Foreshadowing

    • E. 

      Conflict

  • 5. 
    Catastrophe
    • A. 

      Denouement

    • B. 

      Climax

    • C. 

      Resolution

    • D. 

      Foreshadowing

    • E. 

      Conflict

  • 6. 
    It is the moment of greatest danger for the protagonist(s) and usually consists of a seemingly inevitable prospect of failure- it surprises you to the point that gets you excited to see what is to come in the end.
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Climax

    • C. 

      Resolution

    • D. 

      Foreshadowing

    • E. 

      Conflict

  • 7. 
     the location and time of a story, is often listed as one of the fundamental elements of fiction
    • A. 

      Denouement

    • B. 

      Climax

    • C. 

      Setting

    • D. 

      Foreshadowing

    • E. 

      Conflict

  • 8. 
    An introduction which tells us who the characters are, when and where the story takes place, and what their conflict is.
    • A. 

      Denouement

    • B. 

      Exposition

    • C. 

      Setting

    • D. 

      Foreshadowing

    • E. 

      Conflict

  • 9. 
    A narrator is telling the story either from an all-knowing or limited view
    • A. 

      Denouement

    • B. 

      3rd person

    • C. 

      1st person

    • D. 

      Foreshadowing

    • E. 

      Conflict

  • 10. 
    One of the characters, using the personal pronoun 'I', is telling the story
    • A. 

      Denouement

    • B. 

      3rd person

    • C. 

      1st person

    • D. 

      Foreshadowing

    • E. 

      Conflict

  • 11. 
    The main character, often a good or heroic type
    • A. 

      Antagonist

    • B. 

      3rd person

    • C. 

      1st person

    • D. 

      Foreshadowing

    • E. 

      Protagonist

  • 12. 
    The main character, often a good or heroic type
    • A. 

      Antagonsist

    • B. 

      3rd person

    • C. 

      1st person

    • D. 

      Foreshadowing

    • E. 

      Protagonist

  • 13. 
    A general and universal point about human nature or life expressed in the narrative.
    • A. 

      Antagonsist

    • B. 

      3rd person

    • C. 

      1st person

    • D. 

      Theme

    • E. 

      Protagonist

  • 14. 
    A Important events which occur as the characters take steps
    • A. 

      Antagonsist

    • B. 

      3rd person

    • C. 

      1st person

    • D. 

      Complication

    • E. 

      Protagonist

  • 15. 
    Major character in a work of fiction who encounters conflict and is changed by it
    • A. 

      Flat

    • B. 

      Minor

    • C. 

      Round

    • D. 

      Dynamic

    • E. 

      Static

  • 16. 
    Minor character in a work of fiction who does not undergo substantial change or growth in the course of a story
    • A. 

      Flat

    • B. 

      Minor

    • C. 

      Round

    • D. 

      Dynamic

  • 17. 
     symbolic narrative in which the surface details imply a secondary meaning
    • A. 

      Flat

    • B. 

      Minor

    • C. 

      Round

    • D. 

      Allegory

  • 18. 
     A contrast or discrepancy between what is said and what is meant or between what happens and what is expected to happen in life and in literature
    • A. 

      Flat

    • B. 

      Minor

    • C. 

      Irony

    • D. 

      Allegory

  • 19. 
     A form of language use in which writers and speakers convey something other than the literal meaning of their words. Examples include hyperbole or exaggeration, litotes or understatement, simile and metaphor, which employ comparison, and synecdoche and metonymy, in which a part of a thing stands for the whole.
    • A. 

      Flat

    • B. 

      Figurative language

    • C. 

      Irony

    • D. 

      Allegory

  • 20. 
    An interruption of a work's chronology to describe or present an incident that occurred prior to the main time frame of a work's action. Writers use flashbacks to complicate the sense of chronology in the plot of their works and to convey the richness of the experience of human time. Faulkner's story "A Rose for Emily" includes flashbacks.
    • A. 

      Flashback

    • B. 

      Figurative language

    • C. 

      Irony

    • D. 

      Allegory

  • 21. 
    A comparison between essentially unlike things without an explicitly comparative word such as like or as. An example is "My love is a red, red rose,"
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Figurative language

    • C. 

      Irony

    • D. 

      Allegory

  • 22. 
    A figure of speech involving a comparison between unlike things using like, as, or as though. An example: "My love is like a red, red rose
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Irony

    • D. 

      Allegory

  • 23. 
    An object or action in a literary work that means more than itself, that stands for something beyond itself. The glass unicorn in The Glass Menagerie, the rocking horse in "The Rocking-Horse Winner," the road in Frost's "The Road Not Taken"--all are symbols in this sense.
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Irony

    • D. 

      Symbol

  • 24. 
    The narrative perspective from which a literary work is presented to the reader. There are four traditional points of view: third person omniscient, third person, first person, and second person
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Point of view

    • D. 

      Symbol

  • 25. 
    Same as round character
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Dynamic

    • D. 

      Symbol