Official Quiz 1: Philosophy 1

27 Questions

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Philosophy Quizzes & Trivia

THIS IS THE OFFICIAL QUIZ. YOU MAY ONLY TAKE IT ONCE. DO NOT PRESS THE BACK BUTTON TO CHANGE YOUR ANSWERS! THIS WILL INVALIDATE YOUR RESULTS! You will take 30 questions at a time randomly with a time limit of 90 minutes.  You will have until MARCH 12, 11:59PM to complete it.  You may use any notes, slides, or questions you've gathered so far! Keep your notes close to you while taking the Quiz, or open appropriate windows on your computer, so that you don't run out of time. To receive credit for the actual quiz, you must follow ALL of these steps:(1) Send me an email ([email protected] Com) through your personal email just before you plan to take the quiz stating that you certify that you are taking this quiz on your own;(2) Go directly to the Quiz Site (do not wa


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The word "philosophy" derives from:
    • A. 

      Latin, meaning "love of knowledge"

    • B. 

      Greek, meaning "love of wisdom"

    • C. 

      Latin, meaning "love of life"

    • D. 

      Greek, meaning "love of science"

    • E. 

      Icelandic, meaning "love of fish"

  • 2. 
    A philosophical argument is a form of verbal disagreement.
    • A. 

      TRUE

    • B. 

      FALSE

  • 3. 
    Plato's Allegory of the Cave can be interpreted as:
    • A. 

      A move from wisdom to ignorance

    • B. 

      A way of educating young children

    • C. 

      The experience of the Forms

    • D. 

      The process of becoming a journalist

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 4. 
    Sherlock Homes found clues that led him to make deductive conclusions that led him to the actual characters responsible for the crime.
    • A. 

      TRUE

    • B. 

      FALSE

  • 5. 
    An assumption is:
    • A. 

      Any idea

    • B. 

      A hasty conclusion

    • C. 

      A principle taken for granted

    • D. 

      A proof

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 6. 
    Thales and Anaximander would be considered:
    • A. 

      Monists

    • B. 

      Pluralists

    • C. 

      Rationalists

    • D. 

      Empiricists

  • 7. 
    Knowledge often is defined as (by Plato and other philosophers):
    • A. 

      Any idea

    • B. 

      An idea about God or the supernatural

    • C. 

      Justified true beliefs

    • D. 

      The foundations of self-consciouness

    • E. 

      Any idea held to be true

  • 8. 
    The subdivisions of branches of philosophy (according to Lee Archie) are:
    • A. 

      Ontology, epistemology, cosmology

    • B. 

      Epistemology, aesthetics, ethics, ontology

    • C. 

      Aesthetics, ontology, scientology, epistemology

    • D. 

      Epistemology, ontology, ethics

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 9. 
    Cogito ergo sum means "I think, therefore I am." By making this statement, Descartes argued that thinking is essentially the foundation of all human behavior.
    • A. 

      TRUE

    • B. 

      FALSE

  • 10. 
    Socrates was put to death because he was accused of corrupting the youth through his educational techniques.
    • A. 

      TRUE

    • B. 

      FALSE

  • 11. 
    The statement, "I am and am not an animal." would be an example of:
    • A. 

      An assumption

    • B. 

      A conclusion

    • C. 

      A proof

    • D. 

      A paradox

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 12. 
    If you think that beliefs can be best justified in light of the evidence we receive from the mental process of reasoning or intuition, then you are a:
    • A. 

      Rationalist

    • B. 

      Empiricist

    • C. 

      Materialist

    • D. 

      Idealist

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 13. 
    • A. 

      Explains how minds and bodies are linked together

    • B. 

      Explains how only mental states can be completely understood in terms of physical states

    • C. 

      Explain how minds or mental states tend to construct the world in terms of opposites

    • D. 

      Rejects the idea that our minds or mental states are less fundamental than our bodies or physical states

    • E. 

      Rejects the idea that our minds or mental states are more fundamental than our bodies or physical states

  • 14. 
    Heraclitus:
    • A. 

      Believed that the world was made up of tiny "atoms"

    • B. 

      Believed that the world was made from water

    • C. 

      Believed that change has a form that underlies all reality

    • D. 

      Believed that there was an ultimate force ruling the universe

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 15. 
    The Easy Problem explains how we feel about being "conscious."
    • A. 

      TRUE

    • B. 

      FALSE

  • 16. 
    Steven Pinker argues that the "mystery of consciousness" can be explained:
    • A. 

      As an immortal soul separate from the body

    • B. 

      As a "ghost in the machine"

    • C. 

      As a "brain in a vat"

    • D. 

      As biological or neurological processes

    • E. 

      As a distinction between mind and body

  • 17. 
    W.E.B. DuBois used this term to describe an awareness of one self and the awareness of how others perceive us.
    • A. 

      Dualism

    • B. 

      Split personality

    • C. 

      Identity

    • D. 

      Double consciousness

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 18. 
    • A. 

      Plato

    • B. 

      Socrates

    • C. 

      Robert Solomon

    • D. 

      Ken Robinson

    • E. 

      Helen Fisher

  • 19. 
    • A. 

      Mathematics was the key to life

    • B. 

      Numbers were the real nature of things

    • C. 

      That the sum of the two lengths of a triangle is always greater than the the third

    • D. 

      1 + 1 = 10 (in binary, or base 2)

    • E. 

      He would one day discover one of the most important theories of all time

  • 20. 
    Democritus, in his belief that the universe was made of tiny bits of stuff called "atoms," would be considered:
    • A. 

      A monist

    • B. 

      A pluralist

    • C. 

      A materialist

    • D. 

      A and B

    • E. 

      B and C

  • 21. 
    • A. 

      Inductively valid

    • B. 

      Deductively valid

    • C. 

      Reasonably sound

    • D. 

      Unreasonably shaky

    • E. 

      Honestly true

  • 22. 
    • A. 

      They would be seen as powerful agents of change

    • B. 

      Their roles would be restricted and circumscribed

    • C. 

      They would be seen as having different status than men

    • D. 

      They would promote aspects of lesbianism

    • E. 

      They would castrate men in dark caves

  • 23. 
    When we travel to far away places because of their exotic allure or "natural" escape, we we call this:
    • A. 

      Love

    • B. 

      Eros

    • C. 

      Xenophobia

    • D. 

      Xenophilia

    • E. 

      Stereotyping

  • 24. 
    Every time it rains, it is cloudy. It is cloudy. Therefore, it will rain. If we assume the premises above are true, the following argument would be considered:
    • A. 

      Inductively valid

    • B. 

      Deductively valid

    • C. 

      Reasonably sound

    • D. 

      Certainly true

    • E. 

      Not necessarily true

  • 25. 
    A race is a biological construct that allows us to distinguish groups from one another.
    • A. 

      TRUE

    • B. 

      FALSE

  • 26. 
    Air is source of ultimate reality according to:
    • A. 

      Thales

    • B. 

      Anaximander

    • C. 

      Anaximenes

    • D. 

      Heraclitus

    • E. 

      Parmenides

  • 27. 
    The process of distinguishing mere belief from knowledge is called:
    • A. 

      The mind-body problem

    • B. 

      Dualism

    • C. 

      Double consciousness

    • D. 

      The method of doubt

    • E. 

      All of the above